• A vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate on a ring undergoes quantum dynamics in response to a quantum quench in terms of partial symmetry breaking from a uniform lattice to a biperiodic one. Neither the current, a macroscopic measure, nor fidelity, a microscopic measure, exhibit critical behavior. Instead, the symmetry memory succeeds in identifying the point at which the system begins to forget its initial symmetry state. We further identify a symmetry energy difference in the low lying excited states which trends with the symmetry memory.
  • We investigate the dynamics of a dark-bright soliton in a harmonic potential using a mean-field approach via coupled nonlinear Schr\"odinger equations appropriate to multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates. We use a modified perturbed dynamical variational Lagrangian approximation, where the perturbation is due to the trap, taken as a Thomas-Fermi profile. The wavefunction ansatz is taken as the correct hyperbolic tangent and secant solutions in the scalar case for the dark and bright components of the soliton, respectively. We also solve the problem numerically with psuedo-spectral Runge-Kutta methods. We find, analytically and numerically, for weak trapping the internal modes are nearly independent of center of mass motion of the dark-bright soliton. In contrast, in tighter traps the internal modes couple strongly to the center of mass motion, showing that for dark-bright solitons in a harmonic potential the center of mass and relative degrees of freedom are not independent. This result is robust against noise in the initial condition and should, therefore, be experimentally observable.
  • We study the dynamics of a dark-bright soliton interacting with a fixed impurity using a mean-field approach. The system is described by a vector nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE) appropriate to multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates. We use the variational approximation, based on hyperbolic functions, where we have the center of mass of the two components to describe the propagation of the dark and bright components independently. Therefore, it allows the dark-bright soliton to oscillate. The fixed local impurity is modeled by a delta function. Also, we use perturbation methods to derive the equations of motion for the center of mass of the two components. The interaction of the dark-bright soliton with a delta function potential excites different modes in the system. The analytical model capture two of these modes: the relative oscillation between the two components and the oscillation in the widths. The numerical simulations show additional internal modes play an important role in the interaction problem. The excitation of internal modes corresponds to inelastic scattering. In addition, we calculate the maximum velocity for a dark-bright soliton and find it is limited to a value below the sound speed, depending on the relative number of atoms present in the bright soliton component and excavated by the dark soliton component, respectively. Above a critical value of the maximum velocity, the two components are no longer described by one center of mass variable and develop internal oscillations, eventually breaking apart when pushed to higher velocities. This effect limits the incident kinetic energy in scattering studies and presents a smoking gun experimental signal.
  • We present an open source code to simulate entangled dynamics of open quantum systems governed by the Lindblad master equation with tensor network methods. Tensor network methods using matrix product states have been proven very useful to simulate many-body quantum systems and have driven many innovations in research. Since the matrix product state design is tailored for closed one-dimensional systems governed by the Schr\"odinger equation, the next step for many-body quantum dynamics is the simulation of one-dimensional open quantum systems. We review the three dominant approaches to the simulation of open quantum systems via the Lindblad master equation: quantum trajectories, matrix product density operators, and locally purified tensor networks. The package Open Source Matrix Product States combines these three major methods to simulate one-dimensional open quantum systems with the Lindblad master equation. We access the same underlying tensor network algorithms for all techniques, e.g., the tensor contractions optimized in the same way, allowing us to have a meaningful comparison between the different approaches based on selected examples. These examples include the finite temperature states of the transverse quantum Ising model, the dynamics of an exciton traveling under the influence of spontaneous emission and dephasing, and a double-well potential simulated with the Bose-Hubbard model including dephasing. We analyze which approach is favorable leading to the conclusion that a complete set of all three methods is most beneficial, pushing the limits of different scenarios. The convergence studies using analytical results for macroscopic variables and exact diagonalization methods as comparison, show, for example, that matrix product density operators are favorable for the exciton problem in our study.
  • We use network analysis to describe and characterize an archetypal quantum system - an Ising spin chain in a transverse magnetic field. We analyze weighted networks for this quantum system, with link weights given by various measures of spin-spin correlations such as the von Neumann and Renyi mutual information, concurrence, and negativity. We analytically calculate the spin-spin correlations in the system at an arbitrary temperature by mapping the Ising spin chain to fermions, as well as numerically calculate the correlations in the ground state using matrix product state methods, and then analyze the resulting networks using a variety of network measures. We demonstrate that the network measures show some traits of complex networks already in this spin chain, arguably the simplest quantum many-body system. The network measures give insight into the phase diagram not easily captured by more typical quantities, such as the order parameter or correlation length. For example, the network structure varies with transverse field and temperature, and the structure in the quantum critical fan is different from the ordered and disordered phases.
  • Mott insulators provide stable quantum states and long coherence times to due to small number fluctuations, making them good candidates for quantum memory and atomic circuits. We propose a proof-of-principle for a 1D Mott switch using an ultracold Bose gas and optical lattice. With time-evolving block decimation simulations -- efficient matrix product state methods -- we design a means for transient parameter characterization via a local excitation for ease of engineering into more complex atomtronics. We perform the switch operation by tuning the intensity of the optical lattice, and thus the interaction strength through a conductance transition due to the confined modifications of the "wedding cake" Mott structure. We demonstrate the time-dependence of Fock state transmission and fidelity of the excitation as a means of tuning up the device in a double well and as a measure of noise performance. Two-point correlations via the $g^{(2)}$ measure provide additional information regarding superfluid fragments on the Mott insulating background due to the confinement of the potential.
  • We examine the fractional derivative of composite functions and present a generalization of the product and chain rules for the Caputo fractional derivative. These results are especially important for physical and biological systems that exhibit multiple spatial and temporal scales, such as porous materials and clusters of neurons, in which transport phenomena are governed by a fractional derivative of slowly varying parameters given in terms of elementary functions. Both the product and chain rules of the Caputo fractional derivative are obtained from the expansion of the fractional derivative in terms of an infinite series of integer order derivatives. The crucial step in the practical implementation of the fractional product rule relies on the exact evaluation of the repeated integral of the generalized hypergeometric function with a power-law argument. By applying the generalized Euler's integral transform, we are able to represent the repeated integral in terms of a single hypergeometric function of a higher order. We demonstrate the obtained results by the exact evaluation of the Caputo fractional derivative of hyperbolic tangent which describes dark soliton propagation in the non-linear media. We conclude that in the most general case both fractional chain and product rules result in an infinite series of the generalized hypergeometric functions.
  • Ultra-cold quantum turbulence is expected to decay through a cascade of Kelvin waves. These helical excitations couple vorticity to the quantum fluid causing long wavelength phonon fluctuations in a Bose-Einstein condensate. This interaction is hypothesized to be the route to relaxation for turbulent tangles in quantum hydrodynamics. The local induction approximation is the lowest order approximation to the Biot-Savart velocity field induced by a vortex line and, because of its integrability, is thought to prohibit energy transfer by Kelvin waves. Using the Biot-Savart description, we derive a generalization to the local induction approximation which predicts that regions of large curvature can reconfigure themselves as Kelvin wave packets. While this generalization preserves the arclength metric, a quantity conserved under the Eulerian flow of vortex lines, it also introduces a non-Hamiltonian structure on the geometric properties of the vortex line. It is this non-Hamiltonian evolution of curvature and torsion which provides a resolution to the missing Kelvin wave motion. In this work, we derive corrections to the local induction approximation in powers of curvature and state them for utilization in vortex filament methods. Using the Hasimoto transformation, we arrive at a nonlinear integro-differential equation which reduces to a modified nonlinear Schr\"odinger type evolution of the curvature and torsion on the vortex line. We show that this modification seeks to disperse localized curvature profiles. At the same time, the non-Hamiltonian break in integrability bolsters the deforming curvature profile and simulations show that this dynamic results in Kelvin wave propagation along the dispersive vortex medium.
  • Typical treatments of superconducting or superfluid Josephson junctions rely on mean-field or two-mode models; we explore many-body dynamics of an isolated, ultracold, Bose-gas long Josephson junction using time-evolving block decimation simulations. We demonstrate that with increasing repulsive interaction strength, localized dynamics emerge that influence macroscopic condensate behavior and can lead to formation of solitons that directly oppose the symmetry of the junction. Initial state population and phase yield insight into dynamic tunneling regimes of a quasi one-dimensional double well potential, from Josephson oscillations to macroscopic self-trapping. Population imbalance simulations reveal substantial deviation of many-body dynamics from mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii predictions, particularly as the barrier height and interaction strength increase. In addition, the sudden approximation supports localized particle-hole formation after a diabatic quench, and correlation measures unveil a new dynamic regime: the Fock flashlight.
  • Tensor network methods as presented in our open source Matrix Product States library have opened up the possibility to study many-body quantum physics in one and quasi-one-dimensional systems in an easily accessible package similar to density functional theory codes but for strongly correlated dynamics. Here, we address methods which allow one to capture the full entanglement without truncation of the Hilbert space. Such methods are suitable for validation of and comparisons to tensor network algorithms, but especially useful in the case of new kinds of quantum states with high entanglement violating the truncation in tensor networks. Quantum cellular automata are one example for such a system, characterized by tunable complexity, entanglement, and a large spread over the Hilbert space. Beyond the evolution of pure states as a closed system, we adapt the techniques for open quantum systems simulated via the Lindblad master equation. We present three algorithms for solving closed-system many-body time evolution without truncation of the Hilbert space. Exact diagonalization methods have the advantage that they not only keep the full entanglement but also require no approximations to the propagator. Seeking the limits of a maximal number of qubits on a single core, we use Trotter decompositions or Krylov approximation to the exponential of the Hamiltonian. All three methods are also implemented for open systems represented via the Lindblad master equation built from local channels. We show their convergence parameters and focus on efficient schemes for their implementations including Abelian symmetries, e.g., $\mathcal{U}(1)$ symmetry used for number conservation in the Bose-Hubbard model or discrete $\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetries in the quantum Ising model.
  • We present exact analytical results for the Caputo fractional derivative of a wide class of elementary functions, including trigonometric and inverse trigonometric, hyperbolic and inverse hyperbolic, Gaussian, quartic Gaussian, and Lorentzian functions. These results are especially important for multi-scale physical systems, such as porous materials, disordered media, and turbulent fluids, in which transport is described by fractional partial differential equations. The exact results for the Caputo fractional derivative are obtained from a single generalized Euler's integral transform of the generalized hyper-geometric function with a power-law argument. We present a proof of the generalized Euler's integral transform and directly apply it to the exact evaluation of the Caputo fractional derivative of a broad spectrum of functions, provided that these functions can be expressed in terms of a generalized hyper-geometric function with a power-law argument. We determine that the Caputo fractional derivative of elementary functions is given by the generalized hyper-geometric function. Moreover, we show that in the most general case the final result cannot be reduced to elementary functions, in contrast to both the Liouville-Caputo and Fourier fractional derivatives. However, we establish that in the infinite limit of the argument of elementary functions, all three definitions of a fractional derivative - the Caputo, Liouville-Caputo, and Fourier- converge to the same result given by the elementary functions. Finally, we prove the equivalence between Liouville-Caputo and Fourier fractional derivatives.
  • We use the displacement operator to derive an infinite series of integer order derivatives for the Gr\"{u}nwald-Letnikov fractional derivative and show its correspondence to the Riemann-Liouville and Caputo fractional derivatives. We demonstrate that all three definitions of a fractional derivative lead to the same infinite series of integer order derivatives. We find that functions normally represented by Taylor series with a finite radius of convergence have a corresponding integer derivative expansion with an infinite radius of convergence. Specifically, we demonstrate robust convergence of the integer derivative series for the hyperbolic secant (tangent) function, characterized by a finite radius of convergence of the Taylor series $R=\pi/2$, which describes bright (dark) soliton propagation in non-linear media. We also show that for a plane wave, which has a Taylor series with an infinite radius of convergence, as the number of terms in the integer derivative expansion increases, the truncation error decreases. Finally, we illustrate the utility of the truncated integer derivative series by solving two linear fractional differential equations, where the fractional derivative is replaced by an integer derivative series up to the second order derivative. We find that our numerical results closely approximate the exact solutions given by the Mittag-Leffler and Fox-Wright functions. Thus, we demonstrate that the truncated expansion is a powerful method for solving linear fractional differential equations, such as the fractional Schr\"{o}dinger equation.
  • We quantify the emergent complexity of quantum states near quantum critical points on regular 1D lattices, via complex network measures based on quantum mutual information as the adjacency matrix, in direct analogy to quantifying the complexity of EEG/fMRI measurements of the brain. Using matrix product state methods, we show that network density, clustering, disparity, and Pearson's correlation obtain the critical point for both quantum Ising and Bose-Hubbard models to a high degree of accuracy in finite-size scaling for three classes of quantum phase transitions, $Z_2$, mean field superfluid/Mott insulator, and a BKT crossover.
  • Numerical simulations are a powerful tool to study quantum systems beyond exactly solvable systems lacking an analytic expression. For one-dimensional entangled quantum systems, tensor network methods, amongst them Matrix Product States (MPSs), have attracted interest from different fields of quantum physics ranging from solid state systems to quantum simulators and quantum computing. Our open source MPS code provides the community with a toolset to analyze the statics and dynamics of one-dimensional quantum systems. Here, we present our open source library, Open Source Matrix Product States (OSMPS), of MPS methods implemented in Python and Fortran2003. The library includes tools for ground state calculation and excited states via the variational ansatz. We also support ground states for infinite systems with translational invariance. Dynamics are simulated with different algorithms, including three algorithms with support for long-range interactions. Convenient features include built-in support for fermionic systems and number conservation with rotational $\mathcal{U}(1)$ and discrete $\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetries for finite systems, as well as data parallelism with MPI. We explain the principles and techniques used in this library along with examples of how to efficiently use the general interfaces to analyze the Ising and Bose-Hubbard models. This description includes the preparation of simulations as well as dispatching and post-processing of them.
  • We investigate an extension of the quantum Ising model in one spatial dimension including long-range $1 / r^{\alpha}$ interactions in its statics and dynamics with possible applications from heteronuclear polar molecules in optical lattices to trapped ions described by two-state spin systems. We introduce the statics of the system via both numerical techniques with finite size and infinite size matrix product states and a theoretical approaches using a truncated Jordan-Wigner transformation for the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic case and show that finite size effects have a crucial role shifting the quantum critical point of the external field by fifteen percent between thirty-two and around five-hundred spins. We numerically study the Kibble-Zurek hypothesis in the long-range quantum Ising model with Matrix Product States. A linear quench of the external field through the quantum critical point yields a power-law scaling of the defect density as a function of the total quench time. For example, the increase of the defect density is slower for longer-range models and the critical exponent changes by twenty-five per cent. Our study emphasizes the importance of such long-range interactions in statics and dynamics that could point to similar phenomena in a different setup of dynamical systems or for other models.
  • Recent experiments on macroscopic quantum tunneling reveal a non-exponential decay of the number of atoms trapped in a quasibound state behind a potential barrier. Through both experiment and theory, we demonstrate this non-exponential decay results from interactions between atoms. Quantum tunneling of tens of thousands of 87 Rb atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate is modeled by a modified Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin model, taking into account the effective time-dependent barrier induced by the mean-field. Three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii simulations corroborate a mean-field result when compared with experiments. However, with one-dimensional modeling using time-evolving block decimation, we present an effective renormalized mean-field theory that suggests many-body dynamics for which a bare mean-field theory may not apply.
  • We explore the quantum many-body physics of a three-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in an optical lattices driven by laser fields in $V$ and $\Lambda$ configurations. We obtain exact analytical expressions for the energy spectrum and amplitudes of elementary excitations, and discover symmetries among them. We demonstrate that the applied laser fields induce a gap in the otherwise gapless Bogoliubov spectrum. We find that Landau damping of the collective modes above the energy of the gap is carried by laser-induced roton modes and is considerably suppressed compared to the phonon-mediated damping endemic to undriven scalar BECs.
  • When a semiconductor absorbs light, the resulting electron-hole superposition amounts to a uncontrolled quantum ripple that eventually degenerates into diffusion. If the conformation of these excitonic superpositions could be engineered, though, they would constitute a new means of transporting information and energy. We show that properly designed laser pulses can be used to create such excitonic wave packets. They can be formed with a prescribed speed, direction and spectral make-up that allows them to be selectively passed, rejected or even dissociated using superlattices. Their coherence also provides a handle for manipulation using active, external controls. Energy and information can be conveniently processed and subsequently removed at a distant site by reversing the original procedure to produce a stimulated emission. The ability to create, manage and remove structured excitons comprises the foundation for opto-excitonic circuits with application to a wide range of quantum information, energy and light-flow technologies. The paradigm is demonstrated using both Tight-Binding and Time-Domain Density Functional Theory simulations.
  • We explore quantum many-body physics of a driven Bose-Einstein condensate in optical lattices. The laser field induces a gap in the generalized Bogoliubov spectrum proportional to the effective Rabi frequency. The lowest lying modes in a driven condensate are characterized by zero group velocity and non-zero current. Thus, the laser field induces roton modes, which carry interaction in a driven condensate. We show that collective excitations below the energy of the laser-induced gap remain undamped, while above the gap they are characterized by a significantly suppressed Landau damping rate.
  • We uncover signatures of quantum chaos in the many-body dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate-based quantum ratchet in a toroidal trap. We propose measures including entanglement, condensate depletion, and spreading over a fixed basis in many-body Hilbert space which quantitatively identify the region in which quantum chaotic many-body dynamics occurs, where random matrix theory is limited or inaccessible. With these tools we show that many-body quantum chaos is neither highly entangled nor delocalized in the Hilbert space, contrary to conventionally expected signatures of quantum chaos.
  • When an interaction quench by a factor of four is applied to an attractive Bose-Einstein condensate, a higher-order quantum bright soliton exhibiting robust oscillations is predicted in the semiclassical limit by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Combining matrix-product state simulations of the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian with analytical treatment via the Lieb-Liniger model and the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis, we show these oscillations are absent. Instead, one obtains a large stationary soliton core with a small thermal cloud, a smoking-gun signal for non-semiclassical behavior on macroscopic scales and therefore a fully quantum emergent phenomenon.
  • Fractional nonlinear differential equations present an interplay between two common and important effective descriptions used to simplify high dimensional or more complicated theories: nonlinearity and fractional derivatives. These effective descriptions thus appear commonly in physical and mathematical modeling. We present a new series method providing systematic controlled accuracy for solutions of fractional nonlinear differential equations. The method relies on spatially iterative use of power series expansions. Our approach permits an arbitrarily large radius of convergence and thus solves the typical divergence problem endemic to power series approaches. We apply our method to the fractional nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation and its imaginary time rotation, the fractional nonlinear diffusion equation. For the fractional nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation we find fractional generalizations of cnoidal waves of Jacobi elliptic functions as well as a fractional bright soliton. For the fractional nonlinear diffusion equation we find the combination of fractional and nonlinear effects results in a more strongly localized solution which nevertheless still exhibits power law tails, albeit at a much lower density.
  • We analyze the dynamics of two-component vector solitons, namely bright-in-dark solitons, via the variational approximation in Bose-Einstein condensates. The system is described by a vector nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation appropriate to multi-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). The variational approximation is based on hyperbolic secant (hyperbolic tangent) for the bright (dark) component, which leads to a system of coupled ordinary differential equations for the evolution of the ansatz parameters. We obtain the oscillation dynamics of two-component dark-bright vector solitons. Analytical calculations are performed for same-width components in the vector soliton and numerical calculations extend the results to arbitrary widths. We calculate the binding energy of the system and find it proportional to the intercomponent coupling interaction, and numerically demonstrate the break up or unbinding of a dark-bright soliton. Our calculations explore observable eigenmodes, namely the internal oscillation eigenmode and the Goldstone eigenmode. We find analytically that the density of the bright component is required to be less than the density of the dark component in order to find the internal oscillation eigenmode of the vector soliton and support the existence of the dark-bright soliton. This outcome is confirmed by numerical results. Numerically, we find that the oscillation frequency is amplitude independent. For dark-bright vector solitons in $^{87}$Rb we find that the oscillation frequency range is 90 to 405 Hz, and therefore observable in multi-component BEC experiments.
  • Tunneling of a quasibound state is a non-smooth process in the entangled many-body case. Using time-evolving block decimation, we show that repulsive (attractive) interactions speed up (slow down) tunneling, which occurs in bursts. While the escape time scales exponentially with small interactions, the maximization time of the von Neumann entanglement entropy between the remaining quasibound and escaped atoms scales quadratically. Stronger interactions require higher order corrections. Entanglement entropy is maximized when about half the atoms have escaped.
  • We experimentally study tunneling of Bose-condensed $^{87}$Rb atoms prepared in a quasi-bound state and observe a non-exponential decay caused by interatomic interactions. A combination of a magnetic quadrupole trap and a thin $1.3\mathrm{\mu m}$ barrier created using a blue-detuned sheet of light is used to tailor traps with controllable depth and tunneling rate. The escape dynamics strongly depend on the mean-field energy, which gives rise to three distinct regimes--- classical spilling over the barrier, quantum tunneling, and decay dominated by background losses. We show that the tunneling rate depends exponentially on the chemical potential. Our results show good agreement with numerical solutions of the 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation.