• This paper is a contribution to the classical cops and robber problem on a graph, directed to two-dimensional grids and toroidal grids. These studies are generally aimed at determining the minimum number of cops needed to capture the robber and proposing algorithms for the capture. We apply some new concepts to propose a new solution to the problem on grids that was already solved under a different approach, and apply these concepts to give efficient algorithms for the capture on toroidal grids. As for grids, we show that two cops suffice even in a semi-torus (i.e. a grid with toroidal closure in one dimension) and three cops are necessary and sufficient in a torus. Then we treat the problem in function of any number k of cops, giving efficient algorithms for grids and tori and computing lower and upper bounds on the capture time. Conversely we determine the minimum value of k needed for any given capture time and study a possible speed-up phenomenon.
  • The gathering problem requires a set of mobile agents, arbitrarily positioned at different nodes of a network to group within finite time at the same location, not fixed in advanced. The extensive existing literature on this problem shares the same fundamental assumption: the topological structure does not change during the rendezvous or the gathering; this is true also for those investigations that consider faulty nodes. In other words, they only consider static graphs. In this paper we start the investigation of gathering in dynamic graphs, that is networks where the topology changes continuously and at unpredictable locations. We study the feasibility of gathering mobile agents, identical and without explicit communication capabilities, in a dynamic ring of anonymous nodes; the class of dynamics we consider is the classic 1-interval-connectivity. We focus on the impact that factors such as chirality (i.e., a common sense of orientation) and cross detection (i.e., the ability to detect, when traversing an edge, whether some agent is traversing it in the other direction), have on the solvability of the problem. We provide a complete characterization of the classes of initial configurations from which the gathering problem is solvable in presence and in absence of cross detection and of chirality. The feasibility results of the characterization are all constructive: we provide distributed algorithms that allow the agents to gather. In particular, the protocols for gathering with cross detection are time optimal. We also show that cross detection is a powerful computational element. We prove that, without chirality, knowledge of the ring size is strictly more powerful than knowledge of the number of agents; on the other hand, with chirality, knowledge of n can be substituted by knowledge of k, yielding the same classes of feasible initial configurations.
  • In this paper we study the Near-Gathering problem for a finite set of dimensionless, deterministic, asynchronous, anonymous, oblivious and autonomous mobile robots with limited visibility moving in the Euclidean plane in Look-Compute-Move (LCM) cycles. In this problem, the robots have to get close enough to each other, so that every robot can see all the others, without touching (i.e., colliding with) any other robot. The importance of solving the Near-Gathering problem is that it makes it possible to overcome the restriction of having robots with limited visibility. Hence it allows to exploit all the studies (the majority, actually) done on this topic in the unlimited visibility setting. Indeed, after the robots get close enough to each other, they are able to see all the robots in the system, a scenario that is similar to the one where the robots have unlimited visibility. We present the first (deterministic) algorithm for the Near-Gathering problem, to the best of our knowledge, which allows a set of autonomous mobile robots to nearly gather within finite time without ever colliding. Our algorithm assumes some reasonable conditions on the input configuration (the Near-Gathering problem is easily seen to be unsolvable in general). Further, all the robots are assumed to have a compass (hence they agree on the "North" direction), but they do not necessarily have the same handedness (hence they may disagree on the clockwise direction). We also show how the robots can detect termination, i.e., detect when the Near-Gathering problem has been solved. This is crucial when the robots have to perform a generic task after having nearly gathered. We show that termination detection can be obtained even if the total number of robots is unknown to the robots themselves (i.e., it is not a parameter of the algorithm), and robots have no way to explicitly communicate.
  • As well known the rotation distance D(S,T) between two binary trees S, T of n vertices is the minimum number of rotations of pairs of vertices to transform S into T. We introduce the new operation of chain rotation on a tree, involving two chains of vertices, that requires changing exactly three pointers in the data structure as for a standard rotation, and define the corresponding chain distance C(S,T). As for D(S,T), no polynomial time algorithm to compute C(S,T) is known. We prove a constructive upper bound and an analytical lower bound on C(S,T) based on the number of maximal chains in the two trees. In terms of n we prove the general upper bound C(S,T)<= n-1 and we show that there are pairs of trees for which this bound is tight. No similar result is known for D(S,T) where the best upper and lower bounds are 2n-6 and 5n/3-4 respectively.
  • Given a Boolean function f on n variables, a Disjoint Sum-of-Products (DSOP) of f is a set of products (ANDs) of subsets of literals whose sum (OR) equals f, such that no two products cover the same minterm of f. DSOP forms are a special instance of partial DSOPs, i.e. the general case where a subset of minterms must be covered exactly once and the other minterms (typically corresponding to don't care conditions of $f$) can be covered any number of times. We discuss finding DSOPs and partial DSOP with a minimal number of products, a problem theoretically connected with various properties of Boolean functions and practically relevant in the synthesis of digital circuits. Finding an absolute minimum is hard, in fact we prove that the problem of absolute minimization of partial DSOPs is NP-hard. Therefore it is crucial to devise a polynomial time heuristic that compares favorably with the known minimization tools. To this end we develop a further piece of theory starting from the definition of the weight of a product p as a functions of the number of fragments induced on other cubes by the selection of p, and show how product weights can be exploited for building a class of minimization heuristics for DSOP and partial DSOP synthesis. A set of experiments conducted on major benchmark functions show that our method, with a family of variants, always generates better results than the ones of previous heuristics, including the method based on a BDD representation of f.