• This paper presents a randomized algorithm for computing the near-optimal low-rank dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). Randomized algorithms are emerging techniques to compute low-rank matrix approximations at a fraction of the cost of deterministic algorithms, easing the computational challenges arising in the area of `big data'. The idea is to derive a small matrix from the high-dimensional data, which is then used to efficiently compute the dynamic modes and eigenvalues. The algorithm is presented in a modular probabilistic framework, and the approximation quality can be controlled via oversampling and power iterations. The effectiveness of the resulting randomized DMD (rDMD) algorithm is demonstrated on several benchmark examples of increasing complexity, providing an accurate and efficient approach to extract spatiotemporal coherent structures from big data in a framework that scales with the intrinsic rank of the data, rather than the ambient measurement dimension.
  • Proper Orthogonal Decomposition is applied to the wall layer of a turbulent channel flow (Re{\tau} = 590) in a novel way, where empirical eigenfunctions are defined in both space and time. Due to the statistical symmetries of the flow, the eigenfunctions are associated with individual wavenumbers and frequencies. Self-similarity of the dominant eigenfunctions, consistent with wall-attached structures, is established. We show that the most energetic modes are characterized by time scales in the range 200-300 viscous wall units. The new decomposition provides a natural measure of the convection velocity of structures, with a characteristic value of 12u{\tau} in the wall layer. Finally, we show that the energy budget can be split into specific contributions for each mode and provides a new closure formulation for the quadratic terms.
  • Diffusion maps are an emerging data-driven technique for non-linear dimensionality reduction, which are especially useful for the analysis of coherent structures and nonlinear embeddings of dynamical systems. However, the computational complexity of the diffusion maps algorithm scales with the number of observations. Thus, long time-series data presents a significant challenge for fast and efficient embedding. We propose integrating the Nystr\"om method with diffusion maps in order to ease the computational demand. We achieve a speedup of roughly two to four times when approximating the dominant diffusion map components.
  • This paper introduces a method for efficiently inferring a high-dimensional distributed quantity from a few observations. The quantity of interest (QoI) is approximated in a basis (dictionary) learned from a training set. The coefficients associated with the approximation of the QoI in the basis are determined by minimizing the misfit with the observations. To obtain a probabilistic estimate of the quantity of interest, a Bayesian approach is employed. The QoI is treated as a random field endowed with a hierarchical prior distribution so that closed-form expressions can be obtained for the posterior distribution. The main contribution of the present work lies in the derivation of \emph{a representation basis consistent with the observation chain} used to infer the associated coefficients. The resulting dictionary is then tailored to be both observable by the sensors and accurate in approximating the posterior mean. An algorithm for deriving such an observable dictionary is presented. The method is illustrated with the estimation of the velocity field of an open cavity flow from a handful of wall-mounted point sensors. Comparison with standard estimation approaches relying on Principal Component Analysis and K-SVD dictionaries is provided and illustrates the superior performance of the present approach.
  • This work discusses a closed-loop control strategy for complex systems utilizing scarce and streaming data. A discrete embedding space is first built using hash functions applied to the sensor measurements from which a Markov process model is derived, approximating the complex system's dynamics. A control strategy is then learned using reinforcement learning once rewards relevant with respect to the control objective are identified. This method is designed for experimental configurations, requiring no computations nor prior knowledge of the system, and enjoys intrinsic robustness. It is illustrated on two systems: the control of the transitions of a Lorenz 63 dynamical system, and the control of the drag of a cylinder flow. The method is shown to perform well.
  • This paper discusses a methodology for determining a functional representation of a random process from a collection of scattered pointwise samples. The present work specifically focuses onto random quantities lying in a high dimensional stochastic space in the context of limited amount of information. The proposed approach involves a procedure for the selection of an approximation basis and the evaluation of the associated coefficients. The selection of the approximation basis relies on the a priori choice of the High-Dimensional Model Representation format combined with a modified Least Angle Regression technique. The resulting basis then provides the structure for the actual approximation basis, possibly using different functions, more parsimonious and nonlinear in its coefficients. To evaluate the coefficients, both an alternate least squares and an alternate weighted total least squares methods are employed. Examples are provided for the approximation of a random variable in a high-dimensional space as well as the estimation of a random field. Stochastic dimensions up to 100 are considered, with an amount of information as low as about 3 samples per dimension, and robustness of the approximation is demonstrated w.r.t. noise in the dataset. The computational cost of the solution method is shown to scale only linearly with the cardinality of the a priori basis and exhibits a (N_q)^s, 2 <= s <= 3, dependence with the number N_q of samples in the dataset. The provided numerical experiments illustrate the ability of the present approach to derive an accurate approximation from scarce scattered data even in the presence of noise.