• We present new measurements of the free-streaming of warm dark matter (WDM) from Lyman-$\alpha$ flux-power spectra. We use data from the medium resolution, intermediate redshift XQ-100 sample observed with the X-shooter spectrograph ($z=3 - 4.2$) and the high-resolution, high-redshift sample used in Viel et al. (2013) obtained with the HIRES/MIKE spectrographs ($z=4.2 - 5.4$). Based on further improved modelling of the dependence of the Lyman-$\alpha$ flux-power spectrum on the free-streaming of dark matter, cosmological parameters, as well as the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) with hydrodynamical simulations, we obtain the following limits, expressed as the equivalent mass of thermal relic WDM particles. The XQ-100 flux power spectrum alone gives a lower limit of 1.4 keV, the re-analysis of the HIRES/MIKE sample gives 4.1 keV while the combined analysis gives our best and significantly strengthened lower limit of 5.3 keV (all 2$\sigma$ C.L.). The further improvement in the joint analysis is partly due to the fact that the two data sets have different degeneracies between astrophysical and cosmological parameters that are broken when the data sets are combined, and more importantly on chosen priors on the thermal evolution. These results all assume that the temperature evolution of the IGM can be modelled as a power law in redshift. Allowing for a non-smooth evolution of the temperature of the IGM with sudden temperature changes of up to 5000K reduces the lower limit for the combined analysis to 3.5 keV. A WDM with smaller thermal relic masses would require, however, a sudden temperature jump of $5000\,K$ or more in the narrow redshift interval $z=4.6-4.8$, in disagreement with observations of the thermal history based on high-resolution resolution Lyman-$\alpha$ forest data and expectations for photo-heating and cooling in the low density IGM at these redshifts.
  • We constrain the stellar population properties of a sample of 52 massive galaxies, with stellar mass $\log M_s/M_\odot>10.5$, over the redshift range 0.5<z<2 by use of observer-frame optical and near-infrared slitless spectra from Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 grisms. The deep exposures allow us to target individual spectra of massive galaxies to F160W=22.5AB. Our fitting approach uses a set of six base models adapted to the redshift and spectral resolution of each observation, and fits the weights of the base models via a MCMC method. The sample comprises a mixed distribution of quiescent (19) and star-forming galaxies (33). Using the cumulative distribution of stellar ages by mass, we define a "quenching timescale" that is found to correlate with stellar mass. The other population parameters, aside from metallicity, do not show such a strong correlation, although all display the characteristic segregation between quiescent and star-forming populations. Radial colour gradients within each galaxy are also explored, finding a wider scatter in the star-forming subsample, but no conclusive trend with respect to the population parameters. Environment is also studied, with at most a subtle effect towards older ages in high-density environments.
  • Galaxy-cluster gravitational lenses can magnify background galaxies by a total factor of up to ~50. Here we report an image of an individual star at redshift z=1.49 (dubbed "MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1 (LS1)") magnified by >2000. A separate image, detected briefly 0.26 arcseconds from LS1, is likely a counterimage of the first star demagnified for multiple years by a >~3 solar-mass object in the cluster. For reasonable assumptions about the lensing system, microlensing fluctuations in the stars' light curves can yield evidence about the mass function of intracluster stars and compact objects, including binary fractions and specific stellar evolution and supernova models. Dark-matter subhalos or massive compact objects may help to account for the two images' long-term brightness ratio.
  • Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array, we have detected CO(3-2) line and far-infrared continuum emission from a galaxy associated with a high-metallicity ([M/H] = -0.27) damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA) at z =2.19289. The galaxy is located 3.5" away from the quasar sightline, corresponding to a large impact parameter of 30 kpc at the DLA redshift. We use archival Very Large Telescope-SINFONI data to detect Halpha emission from the associated galaxy, and find that the object is dusty, with a dust-corrected star formation rate of 110 +60 -30 Msun/yr. The galaxy's molecular mass is large, Mmol = (1.4 +- 0.2) x 10^11 x (\alpha_CO/4.3) x (0.57/r_31) Msun, supporting the hypothesis that high-metallicity DLAs arise predominantly near massive galaxies. The excellent agreement in redshift between the CO(3-2) line emission and low-ion metal absorption (~40 km/s) disfavors scenarios whereby the gas probed by the DLA shows bulk motion around the galaxy. We use Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope HI 21cm absorption spectroscopy to find that the HI along the DLA sightline must be warm, with a stringent lower limit on the spin temperature of T_s > 1895 x (f/0.93) K. The detection of CI absorption in the DLA, however, also indicates the presence of cold neutral gas. To reconcile these results requires that the cold components in the DLA contribute little to the HI column density, yet contain roughly 50% of the metals of the absorber, underlining the complex multi-phase nature of the gas surrounding high-z galaxies.
  • We improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts by including low-resolution spectral data from the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope, which assists in redshift determination by further constraining the shape of the broadband Spectral Energy Disribution (SED) and identifying spectral features. The photometry used in the redshift fits includes near-IR photometry from FIGS+CANDELS, as well as optical data from ground-based surveys and HST ACS, and mid-IR data from Spitzer. We calculated the redshifts through the comparison of measured photometry with template galaxy models, using the EAZY photometric redshift code. For objects with F105W $< 26.5$ AB mag with a redshift range of $0 < z < 6$, we find a typical error of $\Delta z = 0.03 * (1+z)$ for the purely photometric redshifts; with the addition of FIGS spectra, these become $\Delta z = 0.02 * (1+z)$, an improvement of 50\%. Addition of grism data also reduces the outlier rate from 8\% to 7\% across all fields. With the more-accurate spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs), we searched the FIGS fields for galaxy overdensities. We identified 24 overdensities across the 4 fields. The strongest overdensity, matching a spectroscopically identified cluster at $z=0.85$, has 28 potential member galaxies, of which 8 have previous spectroscopic confirmation, and features a corresponding X-ray signal. Another corresponding to a cluster at $z=1.84$ has 22 members, 18 of which are spectroscopically confirmed. Additionally, we find 4 overdensities that are detected at an equal or higher significance in at least one metric to the two confirmed clusters.
  • The spectacular success of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in SN-cosmology is based on the assumption that their photometric and spectroscopic properties are invariant with redshift. However, this fundamental assumption needs to be tested with observations of high-z SNe Ia. To date, the majority of SNe Ia observed at moderate to large redshifts (0.4 < z < 1.0) are faint, and the resultant analyses are based on observations with modest signal-to-noise ratios that impart a degree of ambiguity in their determined properties. In rare cases however, the Universe offers a helping hand: to date a few SNe Ia have been observed that have had their luminosities magnified by intervening galaxies and galaxy clusters acting as gravitational lenses. In this paper we present long-slit spectroscopy of the lensed SNe Ia 2016geu, which occurred at a redshift of z=0.409, and was magnified by a factor of ~55 by a galaxy located at z=0.216. We compared our spectra, which were obtained a couple weeks to a couple months past peak light, with the spectroscopic properties of well-observed, nearby SNe Ia, finding that SN 2016geu's properties are commensurate with those of SNe Ia in the local universe. Based primarily on the velocity and strength of the Si II 6355 absorption feature, we find that SN 2016geu can be classified as a high-velocity, high-velocity gradient and "core-normal" SN Ia. The strength of various features (measured though their pseudo-equivalent widths) argue against SN 2016geu being a faint, broad-lined, cool or shallow-silicon SN Ia. We conclude that the spectroscopic properties of SN 2016geu imply that it is a normal SN Ia, and when taking previous results by other authors into consideration, there is very little, if any, evolution in the observational properties of SNe Ia up to z~0.4. [Abridged]
  • We present new observations acquired with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer instrument on the Very Large Telescope in a quasar field that hosts a high column-density damped Ly{\alpha} absorber (DLA) at z~3.25. We detect Ly{\alpha} emission from a nebula at the redshift of the DLA with line luminosity (27+/-1)x1e41 erg/s, which extends over 37+/-1 kpc above a surface brightness limit of 6x1e-19 erg/s/cm2/arcsec2 at a projected distance of 30.5+/-0.5 kpc from the quasar sightline. Two clumps lie inside this nebula, both with Ly{\alpha} rest-frame equivalent width > 50 A and with relative line-of-sight velocities aligned with two main absorption components seen in the DLA spectrum. In addition, we identify a compact galaxy at a projected distance of 19.1+/-0.5 kpc from the quasar sightline. The galaxy spectrum is noisy but consistent with that of a star-forming galaxy at the DLA redshift. We argue that the Ly{\alpha} nebula is ionized by radiation from star formation inside the two clumps, or by radiation from the compact galaxy. In either case, these data imply the presence of a structure with size >>50 kpc inside which galaxies are assembling, a picture consistent with galaxy formation in groups and filaments as predicted by cosmological simulations such as the EAGLE simulations.
  • To fully exploit the potential of quasars as probes of cosmic chemical evolution and the internal gas dynamics of galaxies it is important to understand the selection effects behind the quasar samples and in particular if the selection criteria exclude foreground galaxies with certain properties (most importantly a high dust content). Here we present spectroscopic follow-up from the 10.4-m GTC telescope of a dust-reddened quasar, eHAQ0111+0641, from the extended High A_V Quasar (HAQ) survey. We find that the z=3.21 quasar has a foreground Damped Lyman-alpha Absorber (DLA) at z=2.027 along the line of sight. The DLA has very strong metal lines due to a moderately high metallicity (with an inferred lower limit of 25% of the solar metallicity), but a very large gas column density along the line-of-sight in its host galaxy. This discovery is further evidence that there is a dust bias affecting the census of metals, caused by the combined effect of dust obscuration and reddening, in existing samples of z>2 DLAs. The case of eHAQ0111+0641 illustrates that dust bias is not only caused by dust obscuration, but also dust reddening.
  • The Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS) is a deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3/IR (Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared) slitless spectroscopic survey of four deep fields. Two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N) area and two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) area. One of the southern fields selected is the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. Each of these four fields were observed using the WFC3/G102 grism (0.8$\mu m$-1.15$\mu m$ continuous coverage) with a total exposure time of 40 orbits (~ 100 kilo-seconds) per field. This reaches a 3 sigma continuum depth of ~26 AB magnitudes and probes emission lines to $\approx 10^{-17}\ erg\ s^{-1} \ cm^{-2}$. This paper details the four FIGS fields and the overall observational strategy of the project. A detailed description of the Simulation Based Extraction (SBE) method used to extract and combine over 10000 spectra of over 2000 distinct sources brighter than m_F105W=26.5 mag is provided. High fidelity simulations of the observations is shown to significantly improve the background subtraction process, the spectral contamination estimates, and the final flux calibration. This allows for the combination of multiple spectra to produce a final high quality, deep, 1D-spectra for each object in the survey.
  • We investigate the stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) between the stellar mass and the integrated gas velocity dispersion, quantified by the kinematic estimator S_0.5 measured from strong emission lines in spectra of galaxies at 0<z<5. We combine luminosity-selected galaxies (`high-luminosity sample') with galaxies selected in other ways (`low-luminosity sample') to cover a range in stellar mass that spans almost five orders of magnitude: 7.0 < log M* < 11.5. We find that the logarithmic power-law slope and normalisation of the TFR are independent of redshift out to z~3. The scatter in the TFR is <0.5 dex such that the gas velocity dispersion can be used as a proxy for the stellar mass of a galaxy independently of its redshift. At z>3 the scatter increases and the existence of a correlation is not obvious. The high-luminosity sample exhibits a flatter slope of 1.5$\pm$0.2 at z<3 compared to the low-luminosity sample slope of 2.9$\pm$0.3, suggesting a turnover in the TFR. The combined sample is well fit with a break in the TFR at a characteristic stellar mass scale of M*~10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$, with no significant evolution out to z~3. We demonstrate that a break in the TFR with a steeper slope at the low-mass end is a natural consequence of galaxy models with a mass-dependent stellar to halo-mass ratio.
  • We present the Lyman-$\alpha$ flux power spectrum measurements of the XQ-100 sample of quasar spectra obtained in the context of the European Southern Observatory Large Programme "Quasars and their absorption lines: a legacy survey of the high redshift universe with VLT/XSHOOTER". Using $100$ quasar spectra with medium resolution and signal-to-noise ratio we measure the power spectrum over a range of redshifts $z = 3 - 4.2$ and over a range of scales $k = 0.003 - 0.06\,\mathrm{s\,km^{-1}}$. The results agree well with the measurements of the one-dimensional power spectrum found in the literature. The data analysis used in this paper is based on the Fourier transform and has been tested on synthetic data. Systematic and statistical uncertainties of our measurements are estimated, with a total error (statistical and systematic) comparable to the one of the BOSS data in the overlapping range of scales, and smaller by more than $50\%$ for higher redshift bins ($z>3.6$) and small scales ($k > 0.01\,\mathrm{s\,km^{-1}}$). The XQ-100 data set has the unique feature of having signal-to-noise ratios and resolution intermediate between the two data sets that are typically used to perform cosmological studies, i.e. BOSS and high-resolution spectra (e.g. UVES/VLT or HIRES). More importantly, the measured flux power spectra span the high redshift regime which is usually more constraining for structure formation models.
  • The gravitationally-lensed galaxy A1689-zD1 is one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed sources ($z=7.5$). It is the earliest known galaxy where the interstellar medium (ISM) has been detected; dust emission was detected with the Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA). A1689-zD1 is also unusual among high-redshift dust emitters as it is a sub-L* galaxy and is therefore a good prospect for the detection of gaseous ISM in a more typical galaxy at this redshift. We observed A1689-zD1 with ALMA in bands 6 and 7 and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in band $Q$. To study the structure of A1689-zD1, we map the mm thermal dust emission and find two spatial components with sizes about $0.4-1.7$\,kpc (lensing-corrected). The rough spatial morphology is similar to what is observed in the near-infrared with {\it HST} and points to a perturbed dynamical state, perhaps indicative of a major merger or a disc in early formation. The ALMA photometry is used to constrain the far-infrared spectral energy distribution, yielding a dust temperature ($T_{\rm dust} \sim 35$--$45$\,K for $\beta = 1.5-2$). We do not detect the CO(3-2) line in the GBT data with a 95\% upper limit of 0.3\,mJy observed. We find a slight excess emission in ALMA band~6 at 220.9\,GHz. If this excess is real, it is likely due to emission from the [CII] 158.8\,$\mu$m line at $z_{\rm [CII]} = 7.603$. The stringent upper limits on the [CII]/$L_{\rm FIR}$ luminosity ratio suggest a [CII] deficit similar to several bright quasars and massive starbursts.
  • We statistically study the physical properties of a sample of narrow absorption line (NAL) systems looking for empirical evidences to distinguish between intrinsic and intervening NALs without taking into account any a priori definition or velocity cut-off. We analyze the spectra of 100 quasars with 3.5 < z$\rm_{em}$ < 4.5, observed with X-shooter/VLT in the context of the XQ-100 Legacy Survey. We detect a $\sim$ 8 $\sigma$ excess in the number density of absorbers within 10,000 km/s of the quasar emission redshift with respect to the random occurrence of NALs. This excess does not show a dependence on the quasar bolometric luminosity and it is not due to the redshift evolution of NALs. It extends far beyond the standard 5000 km/s cut-off traditionally defined for associated absorption lines. We propose to modify this definition, extending the threshold to 10,000 km/s when also weak absorbers (equivalent width < 0.2 \AA) are considered. We infer NV is the ion that better traces the effects of the quasar ionization field, offering the best statistical tool to identify intrinsic systems. Following this criterion we estimate that the fraction of quasars in our sample hosting an intrinsic NAL system is 33 percent. Lastly, we compare the properties of the material along the quasar line of sight, derived from our sample, with results based on close quasar pairs investigating the transverse direction. We find a deficiency of cool gas (traced by CII) along the line of sight associated with the quasar host galaxy, in contrast with what is observed in the transverse direction.
  • From a large sample of $\approx 170,000$ local SDSS galaxies, we find that the Fundamental Metallicity Relation (FMR) has an overabundance of outliers, compared to what would be expected from a Gaussian distribution of residuals, with significantly lower metallicities than predicted from their stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR). This low-metallicity population has lower stellar masses, bimodial specific SFRs with enhanced star formation within the aperture and smaller half-light radii than the general sample, and is hence a physically distinct population. We show that they are consistent with being galaxies that are merging or have recently merged with a satellite galaxy. In this scenario, low-metallicity gas flows in from large radii, diluting the metallicity of star-forming regions and enhancing the specific SFR until the inflowing gas is processed and the metallicity has recovered. We introduce a simple model in which mergers with a mass ratio larger than a minimum dilute the central galaxy's metallicity by an amount that is proportional to the stellar mass ratio for a constant time, and show that it provides an excellent fit to the distribution of FMR residuals. We find the dilution time-scale to be $\tau=1.568_{-0.027}^{+0.029}$ Gyr, the average metallicity depression caused by a 1:1 merger to be $\alpha=0.2480_{-0.0020}^{+0.0017}$ dex and the minimum mass ratio merger that can be discerned from the intrinsic Gaussian scatter in the FMR to be $\xi_\text{min}=0.2030_{-0.0095}^{+0.0127}$ (these are statistical errors only). From this we derive that the average metallicity depression caused by a merger with mass ratio between 1:5 and 1:1 is 0.114 dex.
  • We analyze a sample of 16 absorption systems intrinsic to long duration GRB host galaxies at $z \gtrsim 2$ for which the metallicities are known. We compare the relation between the metallicity and cold gas velocity width for this sample to that of the QSO-DLAs, and find complete agreement. We then compare the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity relation of our sample to that of QSO-DLAs and find that also GRB hosts favour a late onset of this evolution, around a redshift of $\approx 2.6$. We compute predicted stellar masses for the GRB host galaxies using the prescription determined from QSO-DLA samples and compare the measured stellar masses for the four hosts where stellar masses have been determined from SED fits. We find excellent agreement and conclude that, on basis of all available data and tests, long duration GRB-DLA hosts and intervening QSO-DLAs are consistent with being drawn from the same underlying population. GRB host galaxies and QSO-DLAs are found to have different impact parameter distributions and we briefly discuss how this may affect statistical samples. The impact parameter distribution has two effects. First any metallicity gradient will shift the measured metallicity away from the metallicity in the centre of the galaxy, second the path of the sightline through different parts of the potential well of the dark matter halo will cause different velocity fields to be sampled. We report evidence suggesting that this second effect may have been detected.
  • We present X-shooter observations of CASSOWARY 20 (CSWA 20), a star-forming (SFR ~6 Msol/yr) galaxy at z=1.433, magnified by a factor of 11.5 by the gravitational lensing produced by a massive foreground galaxy at z=0.741. We analysed the integrated physical properties of the HII regions of CSWA 20 using temperature- and density-sensitive emission lines. We find the abundance of oxygen to be ~1/7 of solar, while carbon is ~50 times less abundant than in the Sun. The unusually low C/O ratio may be an indication of a particularly rapid timescale of chemical enrichment. The wide wavelength coverage of X-shooter gives us access to five different methods for determining the metallicity of CSWA 20, three based on emission lines from HII regions and two on absorption features formed in the atmospheres of massive stars. All five estimates are in agreement, within the factor of ~2 uncertainty of each method. The interstellar medium of CSWA 20 only partially covers the star-forming region as viewed from our direction; in particular, absorption lines from neutrals and first ions are exceptionally weak. We find evidence for large-scale outflows of the interstellar medium (ISM) with speeds of up 750 km/s, similar to the values measured in other high-z galaxies sustaining much higher rates of star formation.
  • We present a detailed study of the emission from a z = 2.35 galaxy that causes damped Lyman-alpha absorption in the spectrum of the background QSO, SDSS J 2222-0946. We present the results of extensive analyses of the stellar continuum covering the rest frame optical-UV regime based on broad-band HST imaging, and of spectroscopy from VLT/X-Shooter of the strong emission lines: Ly-alpha, [OII], [OIII], [NII], H-alpha and H-beta. We compare the metallicity from the absorption lines in the QSO spectrum with the oxygen abundance inferred from the strong-line methods (R23 and N2). The two emission-line methods yield consistent results: [O/H] = -0.30+/-0.13. Based on the absorption lines in the QSO spectrum a metallicity of -0.49+/-0.05 is inferred at an impact parameter of 6.3 kpc from the centre of the galaxy with a column density of hydrogen of log(N_HI)=20.65+/-0.05. The star formation rates of the galaxy from the UV continuum and H-alpha line can be reconciled assuming an amount of reddening of E(B-V) = 0.06+/-0.01, giving an inferred SFR of 13+/-1 M_sun / yr (assuming a Chabrier IMF). From the HST imaging, the galaxy associated with the absorption is found to be a compact (re=1.12 kpc) object with a disc-like, elongated (axis ratio 0.17) structure indicating that the galaxy is seen close to edge on. Moreover, the absorbing gas is located almost perpendicularly above the disc of the galaxy suggesting that the gas causing the absorption is not co-rotating with the disc. We investigate the stellar and dynamical masses from SED-fitting and emission-line widths, respectively, and find consistent results of 2x10^9 M_sun. We suggest that the galaxy is a young proto-disc with evidence for a galactic outflow of enriched gas. This galaxy hints at how star-forming galaxies may be linked to the elusive population of damped Lyman-alpha absorbers.
  • Strong gravitational lensing magnifies the flux from distant galaxies, allowing us to detect emission lines that would otherwise fall below the detection threshold for medium-resolution spectroscopy. Here we present the detection of temperature-sensitive oxygen emission lines from three galaxies at 2<z<3.5, which enables us to directly determine the oxygen abundances and thereby double the number of galaxies at z>2 for which this has been possible. The three galaxies have ~10% solar oxygen abundances in agreement with strong emission line diagnostics. Carbon and nitrogen ratios relative to oxygen are sub-solar as expected for young metal-poor galaxies. Two of the galaxies are Lya emitters with rest-frame equivalent widths of 20 A and 40 A, respectively, and their high magnification factors allow us for the first time to gain insight into the physical characteristics of high-redshift Lya emitters. Using constraints from the physical properties of the galaxies, we accurately reproduce their line profiles with radiative transfer models. The models show a relatively small outflow in agreement with the observed small velocity offsets between nebular emission and interstellar absorption lines.
  • We present VLT/X-shooter spectra of 13 galaxies in the redshift range 1< z < 6, which are strongly lensed by massive galaxy clusters. Spectroscopic redshifts are measured for nine galaxies, while three sources have redshifts determined from continuum breaks in their spectra. The stellar masses of the galaxies span four orders of magnitude between 10^7 and 10^11 M_sun and have luminosities at 1500 A rest-frame between 0.004 and 9 L^* after correcting for the magnification. This allows us to probe a variety of galaxy types from young, low-mass starburst galaxies to massive evolved galaxies. The lensed galaxies with stellar masses less than 10^10 M_sun have a large scatter compared to the fundamental relation between stellar mass, star formation rates and oxygen abundances. We provide a modified fit to the fundamental relation for low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies with a weaker dependence of the metallicity on either the star formation rate or stellar mass compared to low-redshift, high-mass and high-metallicity SDSS galaxies.
  • We confirm an eighth gravitational lens system in the CASSOWARY catalogue. Exploratory observations with the X-shooter spectrograph on the VLT show the system CSWA5 to consist of at least three images of a blue star-forming galaxy at z = 1.0686, lensed by an apparent foreground group of red galaxies one of which is at z = 0.3877. The lensed galaxy exhibits a rich spectrum with broad interstellar absorption lines and a wealth of nebular emission lines. Preliminary analysis of these features shows the galaxy to be young, with an age of 25-50 Myr. With a star-formation rate of approximately 20 solar masses/yr, the galaxy has already assembled a stellar mass of 3 x 10^9 solar masses and reached half-solar metallicity. Its blue spectral energy distribution and Balmer line ratios suggest negligible internal dust extinction. A more in-depth analysis of the properties of this system is currently hampered by the lack of a viable lensing model. However, it is already clear that CSWA5 shares many of its physical characteristics with the general population of UV-selected galaxies at redshifts z = 1-3, motivating further study of both the source and the foreground mass concentration responsible for the gravitational lensing.
  • In the last years the research on GRB host galaxies has proceeded to more detailed studies both using high resolution afterglow spectroscopy and spatially resolved spectra of nearby hosts. High resolution spectra give a detailed picture of the kinematic properties of matter along the line-of-sight in the host. Two afterglow spectra show clear indications for outflows from their host, namely GRB 030329 and GRB 060206, derived from the position of absorption and host emission lines, nonvariability of Mg I and the radiation field calculated from fine-structure line detections. In nearby GRB hosts it is possible to resolve the actual GRB site. GRB 060505, a SN-less GRB, originated in a relatively metal poor, star forming region with similar properties as other long-duration hosts. A similar conclusion is reached for the site of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw.
  • We present a comprehensive study of the z=0.43 host galaxy of GRB 990712, involving ground-based photometry, spectroscopy, and HST imaging. The broad-band UBVRIJHKs photometry is used to determine the global spectral energy distribution (SED) of the host galaxy. Comparison with that of known galaxy types shows that the host is similar to a moderately reddened starburst galaxy with a young stellar population. The estimated internal extinction in the host is Av=0.15+/-0.1 and the star-formation rate (SFR) from the UV continuum is 1.3+/-0.3 M_sun/yr, (not corrected for the effects of extinction). Other galaxy template spectra than starbursts failed to reproduce the observed SED. We also present VLT spectra leading to the detection of Halpha from the GRB host galaxy. A SFR of 2.8+/-0.7 M_sun/yr, is inferred from the Halpha line flux, and the presence of a young stellar population is supported by a large equivalent width. Images from HST/STIS show that the host has two separate knots, which could be two distinct star-forming regions.