• The main candidate for the superfluid pathways in solid Helium-4 are dislocations with Burgers vector along the hcp symmetry axis. Here we focus on quantum behavior of a generic edge dislocation which can perform superclimb -- climb supported by the superflow along its core. The role of the long range elastic interactions between jogs is addressed by Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that such interactions do not change qualitatively the phase diagram found without accounting for such forces. Their main effect consists of renormalizing the effective scale determining compressibility of the dislocation in the Tomonaga-Luttinger Liquid phase. It is also found that the quantum rough phase of the dislocation can be well described within the gaussian approximation which features off-diagonal long range order in 1D for the superfluid order parameter along the core.
  • A compact photoneutron source (PNS), based on an electron linac was designed and constructed to provide required nuclear data for the design of Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR). Many local shielding are built to reduce the background of neutron and {\gamma} rays, making the location of the time of flight (TOF) detector be fixed at 6.2 m place. Under the existing layout, some physical parameters are very difficult to get by the experiments, while can be obtained by the Monte Carlo simulation method. However, for the deep penetration problem of the neutron and {\gamma} rays transport in the channel of PNS with complex geometry, the normal Monte Carlo method is inefficient since electron transport calculation need a large amount of computing time and neutrons have little contribution to the detector in far-source region. In this work, the subsection method is applied in the simulation for PNS, which divide the simulation process in two steps, recording the neutron and {\gamma} rays information passing through the source window in the first step and adopting the covariance reduction techniques in the second step. The simulated neutron flux and energy spectrum at the TOF detector place with the relative error 1.6% are well agreement with the experimental results, achieving an efficiency 23 times better than the normal method. This method is fast and efficient in predicting the physical parameters, providing a required verification and initiating the foreseen physics experiment.
  • We report a new scenario of time-of-flight (TOF) technique in which fast neutrons and delayed gamma-ray signals were both recorded in a millisecond time window in harsh environments induced by high-intensity lasers. The delayed gamma signals, arriving far later than the original fast neutron and often being ignored previously, were identified to be the results of radiative captures of thermalized neutrons. The linear correlation between gamma photon number and the fast neutron yield shows that these delayed gamma events can be employed for neutron diagnosis. This method can reduce the detecting efficiency dropping problem caused by prompt high-flux gamma radiation, and provides a new way for neutron diagnosing in high-intensity laser-target interaction experiments.
  • In order to measure the total cross section for thermal neutrons, a photoneutron source (PNS, phase 1) has been developed for the acquisition of nuclear data for the Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP). PNS is an electron LINAC pulsed neutron facility that uses the time-of-flight (TOF) technique. It records the neutron TOF and identifies neutrons and $\gamma$-rays by using a digital signal processing technique. The background is obtained by using a combination of employing 12.8 cm boron-loaded polyethylene(PEB) (5$\%$ w.t.) to block the flight path and Monte Carlo methods. The neutron total cross sections of natural beryllium are measured in the neutron energy region from 0.007 to 0.1 eV. The present measurement result is compared with the fold Harvey data with the response function of PNS.
  • The photoneutron source (PNS, phase 1), an electron linear accelerator (linac)-based pulsed neutron facility that uses the time-of-flight (TOF) technique, was constructed for the acquisition of nuclear data from the thorium molten salt reactor(TMSR) at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP). The neutron detector signal, with the information on the pulse arrival time, pulse shape, and pulse height, was recorded by using a waveform digitizer (WFD). By using the pulse height and pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) analysis to identify neutrons and $\gamma$-rays, the neutron TOF spectrum was obtained by employing a simple electronic design, and a new WFD-based DAQ system was developed and tested in this commissioning experiment. The developed DAQ system is characterized by a very high efficiency with respect to millisecond neutron TOF spectroscopy
  • We discuss how to reveal the massive Goldstone mode, often referred to as the Higgs amplitude mode, near the Superfluid-to-Insulator quantum critical point (QCP) in a system of two-dimensional ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices. The spectral function of the amplitude response is obtained by analytic continuation of the kinetic energy correlation function calculated by Monte Carlo methods. Our results enable a direct comparison with the recent experiment [M. Endres, T. Fukuhara, D. Pekker, M. Cheneau, P. Schau{\ss}, C. Gross, E. Demler, S. Kuhr, and I. Bloch, Nature 487, 454-458 (2012)], and demonstrate a good agreement for temperature shifts induced by lattice modulation. Based on our numerical analysis, we formulate the necessary conditions in terms of homogeneity, detuning from the QCP and temperature in order to reveal the massive Goldstone resonance peak in spectral functions experimentally. We also propose to apply a local modulation at the trap center to overcome the inhomogeneous broadening caused by the parabolic trap confinement.
  • We compute the universal conductivity of the (2+1)-dimensional XY universality class, which is realized for a superfluid-to-Mott insulator quantum phase transition at constant density. Based on large-scale Monte Carlo simulations of the classical (2+1)-dimensional $J$-current model and the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we can precisely determine the conductivity on the quantum critical plateau, $\sigma(\infty)=0.359(4)\sigma_Q$ with $\sigma_Q$ the conductivity quantum. The universal conductivity curve is the standard example with the lowest number of components where the bottoms-up AdS/CFT correspondence from string theory can be tested and made to use [R. C. Myers, S. Sachdev, and A. Singh, Phys. Rev. D83, 066017 (2011)]. For the first time, the shape of the $\sigma(i\omega_n)- \sigma(\infty)$ function in the Matsubara representation is accurate enough for a conclusive comparison and establishes the particle-like nature of charge transport. We find that the holographic gauge/gravity duality theory for transport properties can be made compatible with the data if temperature of the horizon of the black brane is different from the temperature of the conformal field theory. The requirements for measuring the universal conductivity in a cold gas experiment are also determined by our calculation.
  • We present spectral functions for the magnitude squared of the order parameter in the scaling limit of the two-dimensional superfluid to Mott insulator quantum phase transition at constant density, which has emergent particle-hole symmetry and Lorentz invariance. The universal functions for the superfluid, Mott insulator, and normal liquid phases reveal a low-frequency resonance which is relatively sharp and is followed by a damped oscillation (in the first two phases only) before saturating to the quantum critical plateau. The counterintuitive resonance feature in the insulating and normal phases calls for deeper understanding of collective modes in the strongly coupled (2+1)-dimensional relativistic field theory. Our results are derived from analytically continued correlation functions obtained from path-integral Monte Carlo simulations of the Bose-Hubbard model.