• The present work investigates sidewall effects on the characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) compressible flows over a rectangular cavity with aspect ratios of $L/D=6$ and $W/D=2$ at $Re_D=10^4$ using large eddy simulations (LES). For the spanwise-periodic cavity flow, large pressure fluctuations are present in the shear layer and on the cavity aft wall due to spanwise vortex roll-ups and flow impingement. For the finite-span cavity with sidewalls, pressure fluctuations are reduced due to interference to the vortex roll-ups from the sidewalls. Flow oscillations are also reduced by increasing the Mach number from 0.6 to 1.4. Furthermore, secondary flow inside the cavity enhances kinetic energy transport in the spanwise direction. Moreover, 3D slotted jets are placed along the cavity leading edge with the objective of reducing flow oscillations. Steady blowing into the boundary layer is considered with momentum coefficient $C_\mu=0.0584$ and $0.0194$ for $M_\infty=0.6$ and $1.4$ cases, respectively. The three-dimensionality introduced to the flow by the jets inhibits large coherent roll-ups of the spanwise vortices in the shear layer, yielding $9-40\%$ reductions in rms pressure and rms velocity for both spanwise-periodic and finite-span cavities.
  • The stability properties of two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) compressible flows over a rectangular cavity with length-to-depth ratio of $L/D=6$ is analyzed at a free stream Mach number of $M_\infty=0.6$ and depth-based Reynolds number of $Re_D=502$. In this study, we closely examine the influence of three-dimensionality on the wake-mode that has been reported to exhibit high-amplitude fluctuations from the formation and ejection of large-scale spanwise vortices. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) and bi-global stability analysis are utilized to study the instability characteristics of the wake-mode. Using the bi-global stability analysis with the time-average flow as the base state, we capture the global stability properties of the wake-mode at a spanwise wavenumber of $\beta=0$. To uncover spanwise effects on the 2D wake-mode, 3D DNS are performed with cavity width-to-depth ratio of $W/D=1$ and $2$. We find that the 2D wake-mode is not present in the 3D cavity flow for a wider spanwise setting with $W/D=2$, in which spanwise structures are observed near the rear region of the cavity. These 3D instabilities are further investigated via bi-global stability analysis for spanwise wavelengths of $\lambda/D=0.5-2.0$ to reveal the eigenspectra of the 3D eigenmodes. Based on the findings of 2D and 3D global stability analysis, we conclude that the absence of the wake-mode in 3D rectangular cavity flows is due to the release of kinetic energy from the spanwise vortices to the streamwise vortical structures that develops from the spanwise instabilities.
  • Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) gives a practical means of extracting dynamic information from data, in the form of spatial modes and their associated frequencies and growth/decay rates. DMD can be considered as a numerical approximation to the Koopman operator, an infinite-dimensional linear operator defined for (nonlinear) dynamical systems. This work proposes a new criterion to estimate the accuracy of DMD on a mode-by-mode basis, by estimating how closely each individual DMD eigenfunction approximates the corresponding Koopman eigenfunction. This approach does not require any prior knowledge of the system dynamics or the true Koopman spectral decomposition. The method may be applied to extensions of DMD (i.e., extended/kernel DMD), which are applicable to a wider range of problems. The accuracy criterion is first validated against the true error with a synthetic system for which the true Koopman spectral decomposition is known. We next demonstrate how this proposed accuracy criterion can be used to assess the performance of various choices of kernel when using the kernel method for extended DMD. Finally, we show that our proposed method successfully identifies modes of high accuracy when applying DMD to data from experiments in fluids, in particular particle image velocimetry of a cylinder wake and a canonical separated boundary layer.
  • Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a popular technique for modal decomposition, flow analysis, and reduced-order modeling. In situations where a system is time varying, one would like to update the system's description online as time evolves. This work provides an efficient method for computing DMD in real time, updating the approximation of a system's dynamics as new data becomes available. The algorithm does not require storage of past data, and computes the exact DMD matrix using rank-1 updates. A weighting factor that places less weight on older data can be incorporated in a straightforward manner, making the method particularly well suited to time-varying systems. A variant of the method may also be applied to online computation of "windowed DMD", in which only the most recent data are used. The efficiency of the method is compared against several existing DMD algorithms: for problems in which the state dimension is less than about~200, the proposed algorithm is the most efficient for real-time computation, and it can be orders of magnitude more efficient than the standard DMD algorithm. The method is demonstrated on several examples, including a time-varying linear system and a more complex example using data from a wind tunnel experiment. In particular, we show that the method is effective at capturing the dynamics of surface pressure measurements in the flow over a flat plate with an unsteady separation bubble.
  • The ability to manipulate and control fluid flows is of great importance in many scientific and engineering applications. Here, a cluster-based control framework is proposed to determine optimal control laws with respect to a cost function for unsteady flows. The proposed methodology frames high-dimensional, nonlinear dynamics into low-dimensional, probabilistic, linear dynamics which considerably simplifies the optimal control problem while preserving nonlinear actuation mechanisms. The data-driven approach builds upon a state space discretization using a clustering algorithm which groups kinematically similar flow states into a low number of clusters. The temporal evolution of the probability distribution on this set of clusters is then described by a Markov model. The Markov model can be used as predictor for the ergodic probability distribution for a particular control law. This probability distribution approximates the long-term behavior of the original system on which basis the optimal control law is determined. The approach is applied to a separating flow dominated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz shedding.
  • The Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD)---a popular method for performing data-driven Koopman spectral analysis---has gained increased adoption as a technique for extracting dynamically meaningful spatio-temporal descriptions of fluid flows from snapshot measurements. Often times, DMD descriptions can be used for predictive purposes as well, which enables informed decision-making based on DMD model-forecasts. Despite its widespread use and utility, DMD regularly fails to yield accurate dynamical descriptions when the measured snapshot data are imprecise due to, e.g., sensor noise. Here, we express DMD as a two-stage algorithm in order to isolate a source of systematic error. We show that DMD's first stage, a subspace projection step, systematically introduces bias errors by processing snapshots asymmetrically. To remove this systematic error, we propose utilizing an augmented snapshot matrix in a subspace projection step, as in problems of total least-squares, in order to account for the error present in all snapshots. The resulting unbiased and noise-aware total DMD (TDMD) formulation reduces to standard DMD in the absence of snapshot errors, while the two-stage perspective generalizes the de-biasing framework to other related methods as well. TDMD's performance is demonstrated in numerical and experimental fluids examples.