• It is well recognised that animal and plant pathogens form complex ecological communities of interacting organisms within their hosts. Although community ecology approaches have been applied to determine pathogen interactions at the within-host scale, methodologies enabling robust inference of the epidemiological impact of pathogen interactions are lacking. Here we developed a novel statistical framework to identify statistical covariances from the infection time-series of multiple pathogens simultaneously. Our framework extends Bayesian multivariate disease mapping models to analyse multivariate time series data by accounting for within- and between-year dependencies in infection risk and incorporating a between-pathogen covariance matrix which we estimate. Importantly, our approach accounts for possible confounding drivers of temporal patterns in pathogen infection frequencies, enabling robust inference of pathogen-pathogen interactions. We illustrate the validity of our statistical framework using simulated data and applied it to diagnostic data available for five respiratory viruses co-circulating in a major urban population between 2005 and 2013: adenovirus, human coronavirus, human metapneumovirus, influenza B virus and respiratory syncytial virus. We found positive and negative covariances indicative of epidemiological interactions among specific virus pairs. This statistical framework enables a community ecology perspective to be applied to infectious disease epidemiology with important utility for public health planning and preparedness.
  • Diversity measurement underpins the study of biological systems, but measures used vary across disciplines. Despite their common use and broad utility, no unified framework has emerged for measuring, comparing and partitioning diversity. The introduction of information theory into diversity measurement has laid the foundations, but the framework is incomplete without the ability to partition diversity, which is central to fundamental questions across the life sciences: How do we prioritise communities for conservation? How do we identify reservoirs and sources of pathogenic organisms? How do we measure ecological disturbance arising from climate change? The lack of a common framework means that diversity measures from different fields have conflicting fundamental properties, allowing conclusions reached to depend on the measure chosen. This conflict is unnecessary and unhelpful. A mathematically consistent framework would transform disparate fields by delivering scientific insights in a common language. It would also allow the transfer of theoretical and practical developments between fields. We meet this need, providing a versatile unified framework for partitioning biological diversity. It encompasses any kind of similarity between individuals, from functional to genetic, allowing comparisons between qualitatively different kinds of diversity. Where existing partitioning measures aggregate information across the whole population, our approach permits the direct comparison of subcommunities, allowing us to pinpoint distinct, diverse or representative subcommunities and investigate population substructure. The framework is provided as a ready-to-use R package to easily test our approach.