• We investigate the capabilities of the ESA Gaia mission for detecting and character- izing short timescale variability, from tens of seconds to a dozen hours. We assess the efficiency of the variogram analysis, for both detecting short timescale variability and estimating the underlying characteristic timescales from Gaia photometry, through extensive light-curve simulations for various periodic and transient short timescale variable types. We show that, with this approach, we can detect fast periodic variabil- ity, with amplitudes down to a few millimagnitudes, as well as some M dwarf flares and supernovae explosions, with limited contamination from longer timescale variables or constant sources. Timescale estimates from the variogram give valuable informa- tion on the rapidity of the underlying variation, which could complement timescale estimates from other methods, like Fourier-based periodograms, and be reinvested in preparation of ground-based photometric follow-up of short timescale candidates evi- denced by Gaia. The next step will be to find new short timescale variable candidates from real Gaia data, and to further characterize them using all the Gaia information, including color and spectrum.
  • Combined studies of variable stars and stellar clusters open great horizons, and they allow us to improve our understanding of stellar cluster formation and stellar evolution. In that prospect, the Gaia mission will provide astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic data for about one billion stars of the Milky Way. This will represent a major census of stellar clusters, and it will drastically increase the number of known variable stars. In particular, the peculiar Gaia scanning law offers the opportunity to investigate the rather unexplored domain of short timescale variability (from tens of seconds to a dozen of hours), bringing invaluable clues to the fields of stellar physics and stellar aggregates. We assess the Gaia capabilities in terms of short timescale variability detection, using extensive light-curve simulations for various variable object types. We show that Gaia can detect periodic variability phenomena with amplitude variations larger than a few millimagnitudes. Additionally, we plan to perform subsequent follow-up of variables stars detected in clusters by Gaia to better characterize them. Hence, we develop a pipeline for the analysis of high cadence photometry from ground-based telescopes such as the 1.2m Euler telescope (La Silla, Chile) and the 1.2m Mercator telescope (La Palma, Canary Islands).
  • Extreme coronal-line emitter (ECLE) SDSSJ095209.56+214313.3, known by its strong, fading, high ionization lines, has been a long standing candidate for a tidal disruption event, however a supernova origin has not yet been ruled out. Here we add several new pieces of information to the puzzle of the nature of the transient that powered its variable coronal lines: 1) an optical light curve from the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) survey that serendipitously catches the optical flare, and 2) late-time observations of the host galaxy with the Swift Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) and X-ray telescope (XRT) and the ground-based Mercator telescope. The well-sampled, $\sim10$-year long, unfiltered LINEAR light curve constrains the onset of the flare to a precision of $\pm5$ days and enables us to place a lower limit on the peak optical magnitude. Difference imaging allows us to estimate the location of the flare in proximity of the host galaxy core. Comparison of the \textsl{GALEX} data (early 2006) with the recently acquired Swift UVOT (June 2015) and Mercator observations (April 2015) demonstrate a decrease in the UV flux over a $\sim 10$ year period, confirming that the flare was UV-bright. The long-lived UV-bright emission, detected 1.8 rest-frame years after the start of the flare, strongly disfavors a SN origin. These new data allow us to conclude that the flare was indeed powered by the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole and that TDEs are in fact capable of powering the enigmatic class of ECLEs.
  • Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research asteroid survey (LINEAR) observed approximately 10,000 deg$^2$ of the northern sky in the period roughly from 1998 to 2013. Long baseline of observations combined with good cadence and depth ($14.5 < r_{SDSS}< 17.5$) provides excellent basis for investigation of variable and transient objects in this relatively faint and underexplored part of the sky. Details covering the repurposing of this survey for use in time domain astronomy, creation of a highly reliable catalogue of approximately 7,200 periodically variable stars (RR Lyrae, eclipsing binaries, SX Phe stars and LPVs) as well as search for optical signatures of exotic transient events (such as tidal disruption event candidates), are presented.
  • Classical Cepheid variable stars are crucial calibrators of the cosmic distance scale thanks to a relation between their pulsation periods and luminosities. Their archetype, {\delta} Cephei, is an important calibrator for this relation. In this paper, we show that {\delta} Cephei is a spectroscopic binary based on newly-obtained high-precision radial velocities. We combine these new data with literature data to determine the orbit, which has period 2201 days, semi-amplitude 1.5 km/s, and high eccentricity (e = 0.647). We re-analyze Hipparcos intermediate astrometric data to measure {\delta} Cephei's parallax ($\varpi = 4.09 \pm 0.16$ mas) and find tentative evidence for an orbital signature, although we cannot claim detection. We estimate that Gaia will fully determine the astrometric orbit. Using the available information from spectroscopy, velocimetry, astrometry, and Geneva stellar evolution models ($M_{\delta Cep} ~ 5.0 - 5.25 M_\odot$), we constrain the companion mass to within $0.2 < M_2 < 1.2 M_\odot$. We discuss the potential of ongoing and previous interactions between the companion and {\delta} Cephei near pericenter passage, informing reported observations of circumstellar material and bow-shock. The orbit may have undergone significant changes due to a Kozai-Lidov mechanism driven by the outer (visual and astrometric) companion HD 213307. Our discovery of {\delta} Cephei's nature as a spectroscopic binary exposes a hidden companion and reveals a rich and dynamical history of the archetype of classical Cepheid variables.
  • We describe the construction of a highly reliable sample of approximately 7,000 optically faint periodic variable stars with light curves obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR across 10,000 sq.deg of northern sky. Majority of these variables have not been cataloged yet. The sample flux limit is several magnitudes fainter than for most other wide-angle surveys; the photometric errors range from ~0.03 mag at $r=15$ to ~0.20 mag at r=18. Light curves include on average 250 data points, collected over about a decade. Using SDSS-based photometric recalibration of the LINEAR data for about 25 million objects, we selected ~200,000 most probable candidate variables and visually confirmed and classified approximately 7,000 periodic variables using phased light curves. The reliability and uniformity of visual classification across eight human classifiers was calibrated and tested using a SDSS Stripe 82 region variable star catalog, and verified using an unsupervised machine learning approach. The resulting sample of periodic LINEAR variables is dominated by 3,900 RR Lyrae stars and 2,700 eclipsing binary stars of all subtypes, and includes small fractions of relatively rare populations such as asymptotic giant branch stars and SX Phoenicis stars. We discuss the distribution of these mostly uncataloged variables in various diagrams constructed with optical-to-infrared SDSS, 2MASS and WISE photometry, and with LINEAR light curve features. An interesting side result is a robust and precise quantitative description of a strong correlation between the light-curve period and color/spectral type for close and contact eclipsing binary stars. These large samples of robustly classified variable stars will enable detailed statistical studies of the Galactic structure and physics of binary and other stars, and we make them publicly available.
  • We present a sample of ~5,000 RR Lyrae stars selected from the recalibrated LINEAR dataset and detected at heliocentric distances between 5 kpc and 30 kpc over ~8,000 deg^2 of sky. The coordinates and light curve properties, such as period and Oosterhoff type, are made publicly available. We find evidence for the Oosterhoff dichotomy among field RR Lyrae stars, with the ratio of the type II and I subsamples of about 1:4. The number density distribution of halo RRab stars as a function of galactocentric distance can be described as an oblate ellipsoid with the axis ratio q=0.63 and with either a single or a double power law with a power-law index in the range -2 to -3. Using a group-finding algorithm EnLink, we detected seven candidate halo groups, only one of which is statistically spurious. Three of these groups are near globular clusters (M53/NGC 5053, M3, M13), and one is near a known halo substructure (Virgo Stellar Stream); the remaining three groups do not seem to be near any known halo substructures or globular clusters, and seem to have a higher ratio of Oosterhoff type II to Oosterhoff type I RRab stars than what is found in the halo. The extended morphology and the position (outside the tidal radius) of some of the groups near globular clusters is suggestive of tidal streams possibly originating from globular clusters. Spectroscopic followup of detected halo groups is encouraged.
  • The ESA Gaia mission will bring a new era to the domain of standard candles. Progresses in this domain will be achieved thanks to unprecedented astrometric precision, whole-sky coverage and the combination of photometric, spectrophotometric and spectroscopic measurements. The fundamental outcome of the mission will be the Gaia catalogue produced by the Gaia Data Analysis and Processing Consortium (DPAC), which will contain a variable source classification and specific properties for stars of specific variability types. We review what will be produced for Cepheids, RR Lyrae, Long Period Variable stars and eclipsing binaries.