• We investigate the impact of local environment on the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) spanning a wide range of galaxy densities from the field up to dense cores of massive galaxy clusters. Data are drawn from a sample of eight fields from the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large-Scale Environments (ORELSE) survey. Deep photometry allow us to select mass-complete samples of galaxies down to 10^9 Msol. Taking advantage of >4000 secure spectroscopic redshifts from ORELSE and precise photometric redshifts, we construct 3-dimensional density maps between 0.55<z<1.3 using a Voronoi tessellation approach. We find that the shape of the SMF depends strongly on local environment exhibited by a smooth, continual increase in the relative numbers of high- to low-mass galaxies towards denser environments. A straightforward implication is that local environment proportionally increases the efficiency of (a) destroying lower-mass galaxies and/or (b) growth of higher-mass galaxies. We also find a presence of this environmental dependence in the SMFs of star-forming and quiescent galaxies, although not quite as strongly for the quiescent subsample. To characterize the connection between the SMF of field galaxies and that of denser environments we devise a simple semi-empirical model. The model begins with a sample of ~10^6 galaxies at z_start=5 with stellar masses distributed according to the field. Simulated galaxies then evolve down to z_final=0.8 following empirical prescriptions for star-formation, quenching, and galaxy-galaxy merging. We run the simulation multiple times, testing a variety of scenarios with differing overall amounts of merging. Our model suggests that a large number of mergers are required to reproduce the SMF in dense environments. Additionally, a large majority of these mergers would have to occur in intermediate density environments (e.g. galaxy groups).
  • In this study we investigate 89 radio galaxies that are spectroscopically-confirmed to be members of five large scale structures in the redshift range of $0.65 \le z \le 0.96$. Based on a two-stage classification scheme, the radio galaxies are classified into three sub-classes: active galactic nucleus (AGN), hybrid, and star-forming galaxy (SFG). We study the properties of the three radio sub-classes and their global and local environmental preferences. We find AGN hosts are the most massive population and exhibit quiescence in their star-formation activity. The SFG population has a comparable stellar mass to those hosting a radio AGN but are unequivocally powered by star formation. Hybrids, though selected as an intermediate population in our classification scheme, were found in almost all analyses to be a unique type of radio galaxies rather than a mixture of AGN and SFGs. They are dominated by a high-excitation radio galaxy (HERG) population. We discuss environmental effects and scenarios for each sub-class. AGN tend to be preferentially located in locally dense environments and in the cores of clusters/groups, with these preferences persisting when comparing to galaxies of similar colour and stellar mass, suggesting that their activity may be ignited in the cluster/group virialized core regions. Conversely, SFGs exhibit a strong preference for intermediate-density global environments, suggesting that dusty starbursting activity in LSSs is largely driven by galaxy-galaxy interactions and merging.
  • We examine the effects of an impending cluster merger on galaxies in the large scale structure (LSS) RX J0910 at $z =1.105$. Using multi-wavelength data, including 102 spectral members drawn from the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large Scale Environments (ORELSE) survey and precise photometric redshifts, we calculate star formation rates and map the specific star formation rate density of the LSS galaxies. These analyses along with an investigation of the color-magnitude properties of LSS galaxies indicate lower levels of star formation activity in the region between the merging clusters relative to the outskirts of the system. We suggest that gravitational tidal forces due to the potential of the merging halos may be the physical mechanism responsible for the observed suppression of star formation in galaxies caught between the merging clusters.
  • One of the main challenges in identifying structural changes in stochastic processes is to carry out analysis for time series with dependency structure in a computationally tractable way. Another challenge is that the number of true change points is usually unknown, requiring a suitable model selection criterion to arrive at informative conclusions. To address the first challenge, we model the data generating process as a segment-wise autoregression, which is composed of several segments (time epochs), each of which modeled by an autoregressive model. We propose a multi-window method that is both effective and efficient for discovering the structural changes. The proposed approach was motivated by transforming a segment-wise autoregression into a multivariate time series that is asymptotically segment-wise independent and identically distributed. To address the second challenge, we derive theoretical guarantees for (almost surely) selecting the true number of change points of segment-wise independent multivariate time series. Specifically, under mild assumptions, we show that a Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC)-like criterion gives a strongly consistent selection of the optimal number of change points, while an Akaike Information Criterion (AIC)-like criterion cannot. Finally, we demonstrate the theory and strength of the proposed algorithms by experiments on both synthetic and real-world data, including the Eastern US temperature data and the El Nino data from 1854 to 2015. The experiment leads to some interesting discoveries about temporal variability of the summer-time temperature over the Eastern US, and about the most dominant factor of ocean influence on climate.