• The clustering ratio is defined as the ratio between the correlation function and the variance of the smoothed overdensity field. In LCDM cosmologies not accounting for massive neutrinos, it has already been proved to be independent from bias and redshift space distortions on a range of linear scales. It therefore allows for a direct comparison of measurements (from galaxies in redshift space) to predictions (for matter in real space). In this paper we first extend the applicability of such properties of the clustering ratio to cosmologies that include massive neutrinos, by performing tests against simulated data. We then investigate the constraining power of the clustering ratio when cosmological parameters such as the total neutrino mass and the equation of state of dark energy are left free. We analyse the joint posterior distribution of the parameters that must satisfy, at the same time, the measurements of the galaxy clustering ratio in the SDSS DR12, and the angular power spectrum of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB measured by the Planck satellite. We find the clustering ratio to be very sensitive to the CDM density parameter, but not very much so to the total neutrino mass. Lastly, we forecast the constraining power the clustering ratio will achieve with forthcoming surveys, predicting the amplitude of its errors in a Euclid-like galaxy survey. In this case, we find it is expected to improve the constraint at 95% level on the CDM density by 40% and on the total neutrino mass by 14%.
  • We consider the application of relative self-calibration using overlap regions to spectroscopic galaxy surveys that use slit-less spectroscopy. This method is based on that developed for the SDSS by Padmanabhan at al. (2008) in that we consider jointly fitting and marginalising over calibrator brightness, rather than treating these as free parameters. However, we separate the calibration of the detector-to-detector from the full-focal-plane exposure-to-exposure calibration. To demonstrate how the calibration procedure will work, we simulate the procedure for a potential implementation of the spectroscopic component of the wide Euclid survey. We study the change of coverage and the determination of relative multiplicative errors in flux measurements for different dithering configurations. We use the new method to study the case where the flat-field across each exposure or detector is measured precisely and only exposure-to-exposure or detector-to-detector variation in the flux error remains. We consider several base dither patterns and find that they strongly influence the ability to calibrate, using this methodology. To enable self-calibration, it is important that the survey strategy connects different observations with at least a minimum amount of overlap, and we propose an "S"-pattern for dithering that fulfills this requirement. The final survey strategy adopted by Euclid will have to optimise for a number of different science goals and requirements. The large-scale calibration of the spectroscopic galaxy survey is clearly cosmologically crucial, but is not the only one.
  • The set-up of the initial conditions in cosmological N-body simulations is usually implemented by rescaling the desired low-redshift linear power spectrum to the required starting redshift consistently with the Newtonian evolution of the simulation. The implementation of this practical solution requires more care in the context of massive neutrino cosmologies, mainly because of the non-trivial scale-dependence of the linear growth that characterises these models. In this work we consider a simple two-fluid, Newtonian approximation for cold dark matter and massive neutrinos perturbations that can reproduce the cold matter linear evolution predicted by Boltzmann codes such as CAMB or CLASS with a 0.1% accuracy or below for all redshift relevant to nonlinear structure formation. We use this description, in the first place, to quantify the systematic errors induced by several approximations often assumed in numerical simulations, including the typical set-up of the initial conditions for massive neutrino cosmologies adopted in previous works. We then take advantage of the flexibility of this approach to rescale the late-time linear power spectra to the simulation initial redshift, in order to be as consistent as possible with the dynamics of the N-body code and the approximations it assumes. We implement our method in a public code providing the initial displacements and velocities for cold dark matter and neutrino particles that will allow accurate, i.e. one-percent level, numerical simulations for this cosmological scenario.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We investigate the use of the cross-correlation between galaxies and galaxy groups to measure redshift-space distortions (RSD) and thus probe the growth rate of cosmological structure. This is compared to the classical approach based on using galaxy auto-correlation. We make use of realistic simulated galaxy catalogues that have been constructed by populating simulated dark matter haloes with galaxies through halo occupation prescriptions. We adapt the classical RSD dispersion model to the case of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function and estimate the RSD parameter $\beta$ by fitting both the full anisotropic correlation function $\xi(r_p,\pi)$ and its multipole moments. In addition, we define a modified version of the latter statistics by truncating the multipole moments to exclude strongly non-linear distortions at small transverse scales. We fit these three observable quantities in our set of simulated galaxy catalogues and estimate statistical and systematic errors on $\beta$ for the case of galaxy-galaxy, group-group, and group-galaxy correlation functions. When ignoring off-diagonal elements of the covariance matrix in the fitting, the truncated multipole moments of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function provide the most accurate estimate, with systematic errors below 3% when fitting transverse scales larger than $10Mpc/h$. Including the full data covariance enlarges statistical errors but keep unchanged the level of systematic error. Although statistical errors are generally larger for groups, the use of group-galaxy cross-correlation can potentially allow the reduction of systematics while using simple linear or dispersion models.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We introduce the idea of {\it effective} dark matter halo catalog in $f(R)$ gravity, which is built using the {\it effective} density field. Using a suite of high resolution N-body simulations, we find that the dynamical properties of halos, such as the distribution of density, velocity dispersion, specific angular momentum and spin, in the effective catalog of $f(R)$ gravity closely mimic those in the $\Lambda$CDM model. Thus, when using effective halos, an $f(R)$ model can be viewed as a $\Lambda$CDM model. This effective catalog therefore provides a convenient way for studying the baryonic physics, the galaxy halo occupation distribution and even semi-analytical galaxy formation in $f(R)$ cosmologies.
  • As a step towards a more accurate modelling of redshift-space distortions in galaxy surveys, we develop a general description of the probability distribution function of galaxy pairwise velocities within the framework of the so-called streaming model. For a given galaxy separation $\vec{r}$, such function can be described as a superposition of virtually infinite local distributions. We characterize these in terms of their moments and then consider the specific case in which they are Gaussian functions, each with its own mean $\mu$ and dispersion $\sigma$. Based on physical considerations, we make the further crucial assumption that these two parameters are in turn distributed according to a bivariate Gaussian, with its own mean and covariance matrix. Tests using numerical simulations explicitly show that with this compact description one can correctly model redshift-space distorsions on all scales, fully capturing the overall linear and nonlinear dynamics of the galaxy flow at different separations. In particular, we naturally obtain Gaussian/exponential, skewed/unskewed distribution functions, depending on separation as observed in simulations and data. Also, the recently proposed single-Gaussian description of redshift-space distortions is included in this model as a limiting case, when the bivariate Gaussian is collapsed to a two-dimensional Dirac delta function. We also show how this description naturally allows for the Taylor expansion of $1+\xi_S(\vec{s})$ around $1+\xi_R(r)$, which leads to the Kaiser linear formula when truncated to second order, expliciting its connection with the moments of the velocity distribution functions. More work is needed, but these results indicate a very promising path to make definitive progress in our program to improve RSD estimators.
  • Galaxy clusters provide unique laboratories to study astrophysical processes on large scales and are important probes for cosmology. X-ray observations are currently the best means of detecting and characterizing galaxy clusters. In this paper we describe the construction of the REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey based on the southern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. REFLEX II extends the REFLEX I survey by a factor of about two down to a flux limit of $1.8 \times 10^{-12}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ (0.1 - 2.4 keV). We describe the determination of the X-ray parameters, the process of X-ray source identification, and the construction of the survey selection function. The REFLEX II cluster sample comprises currently 915 objects. A standard selection function is derived for a lower source count limit of 20 photons in addition to the flux limit. The median redshift of the sample is $z = 0.102$. Internal consistency checks and the comparison to several other galaxy cluster surveys imply that REFLEX II is better than 90\% complete with a contamination less than 10\%.
  • We investigate the impact of statistical and systematic errors on measurements of linear redshift-space distortions (RSD) in future cosmological surveys, analyzing large catalogues of dark-matter halos from the BASICC simulation. These allow us to estimate the dependence of errors on typical survey properties, as volume, galaxy density and mass (i.e. bias factor) of the adopted tracer. We find that measures of the specific growth rate \beta=f/b using the Hamilton/Kaiser harmonic expansion of the redshift-space correlation function \xi(r_p,\pi) on scales larger than 3/h Mpc are typically under-estimated by up to 10% for galaxy sized halos. This is significantly larger than the corresponding statistical errors, which amount to a few percent, indicating the importance of non-linear improvements to the Kaiser model to obtain accurate measurements of the growth rate. We compare the statistical errors to predictions obtained with the Fisher information matrix, based on the usual FKP prescription for the errors on the power spectrum. We show that this produces parameter errors fairly similar to the standard deviations from the halo catalogues, but only if applied to strictly linear scales in Fourier space (k<0.2 h/Mpc). Finally, we present an accurate scaling formula describing the relative error on {\beta} as a function of the survey parameters, which closely matches the simulation results in all explored regimes. This provides a handy and plausibly more realistic alternative to the Fisher matrix approach, to quickly and accurately predict RSD statistical errors expected from future surveys.
  • The clustering of galaxies observed in future redshift surveys will provide a wealth of cosmological information. Matching the signal at different redshifts constrains the dark energy driving the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe. In tandem with these geometrical constraints, redshift-space distortions (RSD) depend on the build up of large-scale structure. As pointed out by many authors measurements of these effects are intrinsically coupled. We investigate this link, and argue that it strongly depends on the cosmological assumptions adopted when analysing data. Using representative assumptions for the parameters of the Euclid survey in order to provide a baseline future experiment, we show how the derived constraints change due to different model assumptions. We argue that even the assumption of a Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time is sufficient to reduce the importance of the coupling to a significant degree. Taking this idea further, we consider how the data would actually be analysed and argue that we should not expect to be able to simultaneously constrain multiple deviations from the standard $\Lambda$CDM model. We therefore consider different possible ways in which the Universe could deviate from the $\Lambda$CDM model, and show how the coupling between geometrical constraints and structure growth affects the measurement of such deviations.
  • We investigate the impact of different observational effects affecting a precise and accurate measurement of the growth rate of fluctuations from the anisotropy of clustering in galaxy redshift surveys. We focus on redshift measurement errors, on the reconstruction of the underlying real-space clustering and on the apparent degeneracy existing with the geometrical distortions induced by the cosmology-dependent conversion of redshifts into distances. We use a suite of mock catalogues extracted from large N-body simulations, focusing on the analysis of intermediate, mildly non-linear scales and apply the standard linear dispersion model to fit the anisotropy of the observed correlation function. We verify that redshift errors up to ~0.2% have a negligible impact on the precision with which the specific growth rate beta can be measured. Larger redshift errors introduce a positive systematic error, which can be alleviated by adopting a Gaussian distribution function of pairwise velocities. This is, in any case, smaller than the systematic error of up to 10% due to the limitations of the linear dispersion model, which is studied in a separate paper. We then show that 50% of the statistical error budget on beta depends on the deprojection procedure through which the real-space correlation function is obtained. Finally, we demonstrate that the degeneracy with geometric distortions can in fact be circumvented. This is obtained through a modified version of the Alcock-Paczynski test in redshift-space, which successfully recovers the correct cosmology by searching for the solution that optimizes the description of dynamical redshift distortions. For a flat cosmology, we obtain largely independent, robust constraints on beta and OmegaM. In a volume of 2.4(Gpc/h)^3, the correct OmegaM is obtained with ~12% error and negligible bias, once the real-space correlation function is properly reconstructed.
  • We investigate the ability of state-of-the-art redshift-space distortions models for the galaxy anisotropic two-point correlation function \xi(r_p, \pi), to recover precise and unbiased estimates of the linear growth rate of structure f, when applied to catalogues of galaxies characterised by a realistic bias relation. To this aim, we make use of a set of simulated catalogues at z = 0.1 and z = 1 with different luminosity thresholds, obtained by populating dark-matter haloes from a large N-body simulation using halo occupation prescriptions. We examine the most recent developments in redshift-space distortions modelling, which account for non-linearities on both small and intermediate scales produced respectively by randomised motions in virialised structures and non-linear coupling between the density and velocity fields. We consider the possibility of including the linear component of galaxy bias as a free parameter and directly estimate the growth rate of structure f. Results are compared to those obtained using the standard dispersion model, over different ranges of scales.We find that the model of Taruya et al. (2010), the most sophisticated one considered in this analysis, provides in general the most unbiased estimates of the growth rate of structure, with systematic errors within 4% over a wide range of galaxy populations spanning luminosities between L > L* and L > 3L*. The scale-dependence of galaxy bias plays a role on recovering unbiased estimates of f when fitting quasi non-linear scales. Its effect is particularly severe for most luminous galaxies, for which systematic effects in the modelling might be more difficult to mitigate and have to be further investigated. [...]
  • We discuss the ability of the planned Euclid mission to detect deviations from General Relativity using its extensive redshift survey of more than 50 Million galaxies. Constraints on the gravity theory are placed measuring the growth rate of structure within 14 redshift bins between z=0.7 and z=2. The growth rate is measured from redshift-space distortions, i.e. the anisotropy of the clustering pattern induced by coherent peculiar motions. This is performed in the overall context of the Euclid spectroscopic survey, which will simultaneously measure the expansion history of the universe, using the power spectrum and its baryonic features as a standard ruler, accounting for the relative degeneracies of expansion and growth parameters. The resulting expected errors on the growth rate in the different redshift bins, expressed through the quantity f\sigma_8, range between 1.3% and 4.4%. We discuss the optimisation of the survey configuration and investigate the important dependence on the growth parameterisation and the assumed cosmological model. We show how a specific parameterisation could actually drive the design towards artificially restricted regions of the parameter space. Finally, in the framework of the popular "\gamma -parameterisation", we show that the Euclid spectroscopic survey alone will already be able to provide substantial evidence (in Bayesian terms) if the growth index differs from the GR value \gamma=0.55 by at least \sim 0.13. This will combine with the comparable inference power provided by the Euclid weak lensing survey, resulting in Euclid's unique ability to provide a decisive test of modified gravity.
  • We use the galaxy angular power spectrum at $z\sim0.5-1.2$ from the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Legacy Survey Wide fields (CFHTLS-Wide) to constrain separately the total neutrino mass $\sum{m_\nu}$ and the effective number of neutrino species $N_{\rm{eff}}$. This survey has recently benefited from an accurate calibration of the redshift distribution, allowing new measurements of the (non-linear) matter power spectrum in a unique range of scales and redshifts sensitive to neutrino free streaming. Our analysis makes use of a recent model for the effect of neutrinos on the weakly non-linear matter power spectrum derived from accurate N-body simulations. We show that CFHTLS, combined with WMAP7 and a prior on the Hubble constant provides an upper limit of $\sum{m_\nu}<0.29\,$eV and $N_{\rm{eff}} =4.17^{+1.62}_{-1.26}$ (2$\,\sigma$ confidence levels). If we omit smaller scales which may be affected by non-linearities, these constraints become $\sum{m_\nu}<0.41\,$eV and $N_{\rm{eff}} =3.98^{+2.02}_{-1.20}$ (2$\,\sigma$ confidence levels). Finally we show that the addition of other large scale structures probes can further improve these constraints, demonstrating that high redshift large volumes surveys such as CFHTLS are complementary to other cosmological probes of the neutrino mass.
  • The 40% Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey catalog (\alpha.40) of approximately 10,150 HI-selected galaxies is used to analyze the clustering properties of gas-rich galaxies. By employing the Landy-Szalay estimator and a full covariance analysis for the two-point galaxy-galaxy correlation function, we obtain the real-space correlation function and model it as a power law, \xi(r) = (r/r_0)^(-\gamma), on scales less than 10 h^{-1} Mpc. As the largest sample of blindly HI-selected galaxies to date, \alpha.40 provides detailed understanding of the clustering of this population. We find \gamma = 1.51 +/- 0.09 and r_0 = 3.3 +0.3, -0.2 h^{-1} Mpc, reinforcing the understanding that gas-rich galaxies represent the most weakly clustered galaxy population known; we also observe a departure from a pure power law shape at intermediate scales, as predicted in \Lambda CDM halo occupation distribution models. Furthermore, we measure the bias parameter for the \alpha.40 galaxy sample and find that HI galaxies are severely antibiased on small scales, but only weakly antibiased on large scales. The robust measurement of the correlation function for gas-rich galaxies obtained via the \alpha.40 sample constrains models of the distribution of HI in simulated galaxies, and will be employed to better understand the role of gas in environmentally-dependent galaxy evolution.
  • A space-based galaxy redshift survey would have enormous power in constraining dark energy and testing general relativity, provided that its parameters are suitably optimized. We study viable space-based galaxy redshift surveys, exploring the dependence of the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) figure-of-merit (FoM) on redshift accuracy, redshift range, survey area, target selection, and forecast method. Fitting formulae are provided for convenience. We also consider the dependence on the information used: the full galaxy power spectrum P(k, P(k) marginalized over its shape, or just the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). We find that the inclusion of growth rate information (extracted using redshift space distortion and galaxy clustering amplitude measurements) leads to a factor of ~ 3 improvement in the FoM, assuming general relativity is not modified. This inclusion partially compensates for the loss of information when only the BAO are used to give geometrical constraints, rather than using the full P(k) as a standard ruler. We find that a space-based galaxy redshift survey covering ~20,000 deg^2 over 0.5< z < 2 with \sigma_z/(1+z)<= 0.001 exploits a redshift range that is only easily accessible from space, extends to sufficiently low redshifts to allow both a vast 3-D map of the universe using a single tracer population, and overlaps with ground-based surveys to enable robust modeling of systematic effects. We argue that these parameters are close to their optimal values given current instrumental and practical constraints.
  • The Chandra COSMOS Survey (C-COSMOS) is a large, 1.8 Ms, Chandra} program that has imaged the central 0.5 sq.deg of the COSMOS field (centered at 10h, +02deg) with an effective exposure of ~160ksec, and an outer 0.4sq.deg. area with an effective exposure of ~80ksec. The limiting source detection depths are 1.9e-16 erg cm(-2) s(-1) in the Soft (0.5-2 keV) band, 7.3e(-16) erg cm^-2 s^-1 in the Hard (2-10 keV) band, and 5.7e(-16) erg cm(-2) s(-1) in the Full (0.5-10 keV) band. Here we describe the strategy, design and execution of the C-COSMOS survey, and present the catalog of 1761 point sources detected at a probability of being spurious of <2e(-5) (1655 in the Full, 1340 in the Soft, and 1017 in the Hard bands). By using a grid of 36 heavily (~50%) overlapping pointing positions with the ACIS-I imager, a remarkably uniform (to 12%) exposure across the inner 0.5 sq.deg field was obtained, leading to a sharply defined lower flux limit. The widely different PSFs obtained in each exposure at each point in the field required a novel source detection method, because of the overlapping tiling strategy, which is described in a companion paper. (Puccetti et al. Paper II). This method produced reliable sources down to a 7-12 counts, as verified by the resulting logN-logS curve, with sub-arcsecond positions, enabling optical and infrared identifications of virtually all sources, as reported in a second companion paper (Civano et al. Paper III). The full catalog is described here in detail, and is available on-line.
  • These are the findings of the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) Figure of Merit (FoM) Science Working Group (SWG), the FoMSWG. JDEM is a space mission planned by NASA and the DOE for launch in the 2016 time frame. The primary mission is to explore the nature of dark energy. In planning such a mission, it is necessary to have some idea of knowledge of dark energy in 2016, and a way to quantify the performance of the mission. In this paper we discuss these issues.
  • We present the first results of the measurements of angular auto-correlation functions (ACFs) of X-ray point sources detected in the XMM-Newton observations of the 2 deg2 COSMOS field (XMM-COSMOS). A significant positive signals have been detected in the 0.5-2 (SFT) band, in the angle range of 0.5-24 arcminutes, while the positive signals were at the 2 and 3 sigma levels in the 2-4.5 (MED) and 4.5-10 (UHD) keV bands respectively. Correctly taking integral constraints into account is a major limitation in interpreting our results. With power-law fits to the ACFs without the integral constraint term, we find correlation lengths of theta_c=1.9+-0.3, 0.8+0.5-0.4 and 6+-2 arcseconds for the SFT, MED, and UHD bands respectively for gamma=1.8. The inferred comoving correlation lengths, also taking into account the bias by the source merging due to XMM-Newton PSF, are 9.8+-0.7, 5.8+1.4-1.7 and 12+-2 h-1 Mpc at the effective redshifts of 1.1, 0.9, and 0.6 for the SFT, MED, and UHD bands respectively. If we include the integral constraint term in the fitting process,assuming that the power-law extends to the scale length of the entire XMM-COSMOSfield, the correlation lengths become larger by 20%-90%. Comparing the inferred rms fluctuations of the spatial distribution of AGNs with those of the underlying mass, the bias parameters of the X-ray source clustering at these effective redshifts are in the range b(AGN)=1.5-4. (Edited to simple ascii.)
  • New observational constraints on the cosmic matter density $\Omega_m$ and an effectively redshift-independent equation of state parameter $w_x$ of the dark energy are obtained while simultaneously testing the strong and null energy conditions of general relativity on macroscopic scales. The combination of REFLEX X-ray cluster and type-Ia supernova data shows that for a flat Universe the strong energy condition might presently be violated whereas the null energy condition seems to be fulfilled. This provides another observational argument for the present accelerated cosmic expansion and the absence of exotic physical phenomena related to a broken null energy condition. The marginalization of the likelihood distributions is performed in a manner to include a large fraction of the recently discussed possible systematic errors involved in the application of X-ray clusters as cosmological probes. This yields for a flat Universe, $\Omega_m=0.29^{+0.08}_{-0.12}$ and $w_x=-0.95^{+0.30}_{-0.35}$ ($1\sigma$ errors without cosmic variance). The scatter in the different analyses indicates a quite robust result around $w_x=-1$, leaving little room for the introduction of new energy components described by quintessence-like models or phantom energy. The most natural interpretation of the data is a positive cosmological constant with $w_x=-1 or something like it.
  • For the first time the large-scale clustering and the mean abundance of galaxy clusters are analysed simultaneously to get precise constraints on the normalized cosmic matter density $\Omega_m$ and the linear theory RMS fluctuations in mass $\sigma_8$. A self-consistent likelihood analysis is described which combines, in a natural and optimal manner, a battery of sensitive cosmological tests where observational data are represented by the (Karhunen-Lo\'{e}ve) eigenvectors of the sample correlation matrix. This method breaks the degeneracy between $\Omega_m$ and $\sigma_8$. The cosmological tests are performed with the ROSAT ESO Flux-Limited X-ray (REFLEX) cluster sample. The computations assume cosmologically flat geometries and a non-evolving cluster population mainly over the redshift range $0<z<0.3$. The REFLEX sample gives the cosmological constraints and their $1\sigma$ random errors of $\Omega_m = 0.341 ^{+0.031}_{-0.029}$ and $\sigma_8 = 0.711 ^{+0.039}_{-0.031}$. Possible systematic errors are evaluated by estimating the effects of uncertainties in the value of the Hubble constant, the baryon density, the spectral slope of the initial scalar fluctuations, the mass/X-ray luminosity relation and its intrinsic scatter, the biasing scheme, and the cluster mass density profile. All these contributions sum up to total systematic errors of $\sigma_{\Omega_m}=^{+0.087}_{-0.071}$ and $\sigma_{\sigma_8}=^{+0.120}_{-0.162}$.
  • The Karhunen-Lo\'{e}ve (KL) eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the sample correlation matrix are used to analyse the spatial fluctuations of the REFLEX clusters of galaxies. The method avoids the disturbing effects of correlated power spectral densities which affects all previous cluster measurements on Gpc scales. Comprehensive tests use a large set of independent REFLEX-like mock cluster samples extracted from the Hubble Volume Simulation. It is found that unbiased measurements on Gpc scales are possible with the REFLEX data. The distribution of the KL eigenvalues are consistent with a Gaussian random field on the 93.4% confidence level. Assuming spatially flat cold dark matter models, the marginalization of the likelihood contours over different sample volumes, fiducial cosmologies, mass/X-ray luminosity relations and baryon densities, yields the 95.4% confidence interval for the matter density of $0.03<\Omega_mh^2<0.19$. The N-body simulations show that cosmic variance, although difficult to estimate, is expected to increase the confidence intervals by about 50%.
  • We describe the main features of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep optical CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys and will provide us with a fully independent probe of the evolution of the cluster abundance, in addition to significantly increasing the number of clusters known at z>0.6.
  • We present a measure of the power spectrum on scales from 15 to 800 Mpc/h using the ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray(REFLEX) galaxy cluster catalogue. The REFLEX survey provides a sample of the 452 X-ray brightest southern clusters of galaxies with the nominal flux limit S=3.0 10^{-12}erg/s/cm2 for the ROSAT energy band (0.1-2.4)keV. Several tests are performed showing no significant incompletenesses of the REFLEX clusters with X-ray luminosities brighter than 10^{43}erg/s up to scales of about 800 Mpc/h. They also indicate that cosmic variance might be more important than previous studies suggest. We regard this as a warning not to draw general cosmological conclusions from cluster samples with a size smaller than REFLEX. Power spectra, P(k), of comoving cluster number densities are estimated for flux- and volume-limited subsamples. The most important result is the detection of a broad maximum within the comoving wavenumber range 0.022<k<0.030 h/Mpc. The data suggest an increase of the power spectral amplitude with X-ray luminosity. Compared to optically selected cluster samples the REFLEX P(k)is flatter for wavenumbers k<0.05 h/Mpc thus shifting the maximum of P(k) to larger scales. The smooth maximum is not consistent with the narrow peak detected at k=0.05 h/Mpc using the Abell/ACO richness $\ge 0$ data. In the range 0.02<k<0.4 h/Mpc general agreement is found between the slope of the REFLEX P(k) and those obtained with optically selected galaxies. A semi-analytic description of the biased nonlinear power spectrum in redshift space gives the best agreement for low-density Cold Dark Matter models with or without a cosmological constant.