• We present final natural system optical (ugriBV) and near-infrared (YJH) photometry of 134 supernovae (SNe) with probable white dwarf progenitors that were observed in 2004-2009 as part of the first stage of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I). The sample consists of 123 Type Ia SNe, 5 Type Iax SNe, 2 super-Chandrasekhar SN candidates, 2 Type Ia SNe interacting with circumstellar matter, and 2 SN 2006bt-like events. The redshifts of the objects range from z = 0.0037 to 0.0835; the median redshift is 0.0241. For 120 (90%) of these SNe, near-infrared photometry was obtained. Average optical extinction coefficients and color terms are derived and demonstrated to be stable during the five CSP-I observing campaigns. Measurements of the CSP-I near-infrared bandpasses are also described, and near-infrared color terms are estimated through synthetic photometry of stellar atmosphere models. Optical and near-infrared magnitudes of local sequences of tertiary standard stars for each supernova are given, and a new calibration of Y-band magnitudes of the Persson et al. (1998) standards in the CSP-I natural system is presented.
  • We present an updated analysis of the intrinsic colors of SNe Ia using the latest data release of the Carnegie Supernova Project. We introduce a new light-curve parameter very similar to stretch that is better suited for fast-declining events, and find that these peculiar types can be seen as extensions to the population of "normal" SNe Ia. With a larger number of objects, an updated fit to the Lira relation is presented along with evidence for a dependence on the late-time slope of the B-V color-curves with stretch and color. Using the full wavelength range from u to H band, we place constraints on the reddening law for the sample as a whole and also for individual events/hosts based solely on the observed colors. The photometric data continue to favor low values of Rv, though with large variations from event to event, indicating an intrinsic distribution. We confirm the findings of other groups that there appears to be a correlation between the derived reddening law, Rv, and the color excess, E(B-V), such that larger E(B-V) tends to favor lower Rv. The intrinsic u-band colors show a relatively large scatter that cannot be explained by variations in Rv or by the Goobar (2008) power-law for circumstellar dust, but rather is correlated with spectroscopic features of the supernova and is therefore likely due to metallicity effects.
  • In this paper we use near-infrared (NIR) spectral observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to study the uncertainties inherent to NIR K corrections. To do so, 75 previously published NIR spectra of 33 SNe Ia are employed to determine K-correction uncertainties in the YJHK_s passbands as a function of temporal phase and redshift. The resultant K corrections are then fed into an interpolation algorithm that provides mean K corrections as a function of temporal phase and robust estimates of the associated errors. These uncertainties are both statistical and intrinsic --- i.e., due to the diversity of spectral features from object to object --- and must be included in the overall error budget of cosmological parameters constrained through the use of NIR observations of SNe Ia. Intrinsic variations are likely the dominant source of error for all four passbands at maximum light. Given the present data, the total Y-band K-correction uncertainties at maximum are smallest, amounting to +/- 0.04 mag at a redshift of z = 0.08. The J-band K-term errors are also reasonably small (+/- 0.06 mag), but intrinsic variations of spectral features and noise introduced by telluric corrections in the H band currently limit the total K-correction errors at maximum to +/- 0.10 mag at z = 0.08. Finally, uncertainties in the K_s-band K terms at maximum amount to +/- 0.07 mag at this same redshift. These results are largely constrained by the small number of published NIR spectra of SNe Ia, which do not yet allow spectral templates to be constructed as a function of the light curve decline rate.
  • This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts, and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2(SiII4130) and pW6(SiII5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of ~0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a ~2--3-sigma correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.
  • We present an observational study of the Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) 2005ip and 2006jd. Broad-band UV, optical and near-IR photometry, and visual-wavelength spectroscopy of SN 2005ip complement and extend upon published observations to 6.5 years past discovery. Our observations of SN 2006jd extend from UV to mid-infrared wavelengths, and like SN 2005ip, are compared to reported X-ray measurements to understand the nature of the progenitor. Both objects display a number of similarities with the 1988Z-like subclass of SN IIn including: (i) remarkably similar early- and late-phase optical spectra, (ii) a variety of high ionization coronal lines, (iii) long-duration optical and near-IR emission and, (iv) evidence of cold and warm dust components. However, diversity is apparent including an unprecedented late-time r-band excess in SN 2006jd.The observed differences are attributed to differences between the mass-loss history of the progenitor stars. We conclude that the progenitor of SN 2006jd likely experienced a significant mass-loss event during its pre-SN evolution akin to the great 19th century eruption of \eta Carinae. Contrarily, as advocated by Smith et al. (2009), we find the circumstellar environment of SN 2005ip to be more consistent with a clumpy wind progenitor.
  • (Abridged) The presence of unburned material in the ejecta of normal Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) is investigated using early-time spectroscopy obtained by the CSP. The tell-tale signature of pristine material from a C+O white dwarf progenitor star is the presence of carbon. The most prominent carbon lines in optical spectra of SNeIa are due to C II. We find that at least 30% of the objects in the sample show an absorption at ~6300 AA which is attributed to C II 6580. An association to H_alpha is considered to be unlikely. These findings imply a larger incidence of carbon in SNeIa ejecta than previously noted. We show how observational biases and physical conditions may hide these C II lines, and account for the scarcity of previous carbon detections. This relatively large frequency of carbon detections has crucial implications on our understanding of the explosive process. The observations indicate that carbon is present merely ~1000 km s^-1 above the bulk of Si II. Spectral modeling shows the detections are consistent with a mass of carbon of 10^-3--10^-2 M_sun. This would imply substantial mixing, which may be related to asymmetries of the flame propagation or clumps of unburned material along the line of sight. However, the uniformity of the relation between C II and Si II velocities is not consistent with the latter scenario. The observational properties of SNeIa with and without carbon signatures are compared. A trend toward bluer color and lower luminosity is found for objects with carbon.
  • Ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN) 2009bb are presented, following the flux evolution from -10 to +285 days past B-band maximum. Thanks to the very early discovery, it is possible to place tight constraints on the SN explosion epoch. The expansion velocities measured from near maximum spectra are found to be only slightly smaller than those measured from spectra of the prototype broad-lined SN 1998bw associated with GRB 980425. Fitting an analytical model to the pseudo-bolometric light curve of SN 2009bb suggests that 4.1+-1.9 Msun of material was ejected with 0.22 +-0.06 Msun of it being 56Ni. The resulting kinetic energy is 1.8+-0.7x10^52 erg. This, together with an absolute peak magnitude of MB=-18.36+-0.44, places SN 2009bb on the energetic and luminous end of the broad-lined Type Ic (SN Ic) sequence. Detection of helium in the early time optical spectra accompanied with strong radio emission, and high metallicity of its environment makes SN 2009bb a peculiar object. Similar to the case for GRBs, we find that the bulk explosion parameters of SN 2009bb cannot account for the copious energy coupled to relativistic ejecta, and conclude that another energy reservoir (a central engine) is required to power the radio emission. Nevertheless, the analysis of the SN 2009bb nebular spectrum suggests that the failed GRB detection is not imputable to a large angle between the line-of-sight and the GRB beamed radiation. Therefore, if a GRB was produced during the SN 2009bb explosion, it was below the threshold of the current generation of gamma-ray instruments.
  • In providing an independent measure of the expansion history of the Universe, the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) has observed 71 high-z Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the near-infrared bands Y and J. These can be used to construct rest-frame i-band light curves which, when compared to a low-z sample, yield distance moduli that are less sensitive to extinction and/or decline-rate corrections than in the optical. However, working with NIR observed and i-band rest frame photometry presents unique challenges and has necessitated the development of a new set of observational tools in order to reduce and analyze both the low-z and high-z CSP sample. We present in this paper the methods used to generate uBVgriYJH light-curve templates based on a sample of 24 high-quality low-z CSP SNe. We also present two methods for determining the distances to the hosts of SN Ia events. A larger sample of 30 low-z SNe Ia in the Hubble Flow are used to calibrate these methods. We then apply the method and derive distances to seven galaxies that are so nearby that their motions are not dominated by the Hubble flow.
  • The giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1316 (Fornax A) is a well-studied member of the Fornax Cluster and a prolific producer of Type Ia supernovae, having hosted four observed events since 1980. Here we present detailed optical and near-infrared light curves of the spectroscopically normal SN 2006dd. These data are used, along with previously published photometry of the normal SN 1980N and SN 1981D, and the fast-declining, low-luminosity SN 2006mr, to compute independent estimates of the host reddening for each supernova, and the distance to NGC 1316. From the three normal supernovae, we find a distance of 17.8 +/- 0.3 (random) +/- 0.3 (systematic) Mpc for Ho = 72. Distance moduli derived from the "EBV" and Tripp methods give values that are mutually consistent to 4 -- 8%. Moreover, the weighted means of the distance moduli for these three SNe for three methods agree to within 3%. This consistency is encouraging and supports the premise that Type Ia supernovae are reliable distance indicators at the 5% precision level or better. On the other hand, the two methods used to estimate the distance of the fast-declining SN 2006mr both yield a distance to NGC 1316 which is 25-30% larger. This disparity casts doubt on the suitability of fast-declining events for estimating extragalactic distances. Modest-to-negligible host galaxy reddening values are derived for all four supernovae. Nevertheless, two of them (SN 2006dd and SN 2006mr) show strong NaID interstellar lines in the host galaxy system. The strength of this absorption is completely inconsistent with the small reddening values derived from the supernova light curves if the gas in NGC 1316 is typical of that found in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way. In addition, the equivalent width of the NaID lines in SN 2006dd appear to have weakened significantly some 100-150 days after explosion.
  • We present the analysis of the first set of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project. Well-sampled, high-precision optical (ugriBV) and near-infrared (NIR; YJHKs) light curves obtained in a well-understood photometric system are used to provide light-curve parameters, and ugriBVYJH template light curves. The intrinsic colors at maximum light are calibrated to compute optical--NIR color excesses for the full sample, thus allowing the properties of the reddening law in the host galaxies to be studied. A low value of Rv~1.7, is derived when using the entire sample of SNe. However, when the two highly reddened SNe in the sample are excluded, a value Galactic standard of Rv~3.2 is obtained. The colors of these two events are well matched by a reddening model due to circumstellar dust. The peak luminosities are calibrated using a two-parameter linear fit to the decline rates and the colors, or alternatively, the color excesses. In both cases, dispersions in absolute magnitude of 0.12--0.16 mag are obtained, depending on the filter-color combination. In contrast to the results obtained from color excesses, these fits give Rv~1--2, even when the two highly reddened SNe are excluded. This discrepancy suggests that, beyond the "normal" interstellar reddening produced in the host galaxies, there is an intrinsic dispersion in the colors of SNe Ia which is correlated with luminosity but independent of the decline rate. Finally, a Hubble diagram is produced by combining the results of the fits for each filter. The resulting scatter of 0.12 mag appears to be limited by peculiar velocities as evidenced by the strong correlation between the distance-modulus residuals among the different filters. The implication is that the actual precision of SN Ia distances is 3--4%.
  • The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is a five-year survey being carried out at the Las Campanas Observatory to obtain high-quality light curves of ~100 low-redshift Type Ia supernovae in a well-defined photometric system. Here we present the first release of photometric data that contains the optical light curves of 35 Type Ia supernovae, and near-infrared light curves for a subset of 25 events. The data comprise 5559 optical (ugriBV) and 1043 near-infrared (YJHKs) data points in the natural system of the Swope telescope. Twenty-eight supernovae have pre-maximum data, and for 15 of these, the observations begin at least 5 days before B maximum. This is one of the most accurate datasets of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae published to date. When completed, the CSP dataset will constitute a fundamental reference for precise determinations of cosmological parameters, and serve as a rich resource for comparison with models of Type Ia supernovae.
  • The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is designed to measure the luminosity distance for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a function of redshift, and to set observational constraints on the dark energy contribution to the total energy content of the Universe. The CSP differs from other projects to date in its goal of providing an I-band {rest-frame} Hubble diagram. Here we present the first results from near-infrared (NIR) observations obtained using the Magellan Baade telescope for SNe Ia with 0.1 < z < 0.7. We combine these results with those from the low-redshift CSP at z <0.1 (Folatelli et al. 2009). We present light curves and an I-band Hubble diagram for this first sample of 35 SNe Ia and we compare these data to 21 new SNe Ia at low redshift. These data support the conclusion that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. When combined with independent results from baryon acoustic oscillations (Eisenstein et al. 2005), these data yield Omega_m = 0.27 +/- 0.0 (statistical), and Omega_DE = 0.76 +/- 0.13 (statistical) +/- 0.09 (systematic), for the matter and dark energy densities, respectively. If we parameterize the data in terms of an equation of state, w, assume a flat geometry, and combine with baryon acoustic oscillations, we find that w = -1.05 +/- 0.13 (statistical) +/- 0.09 (systematic). The largest source of systematic uncertainty on w arises from uncertainties in the photometric calibration, signaling the importance of securing more accurate photometric calibrations for future supernova cosmology programs. Finally, we conclude that either the dust affecting the luminosities of SNe Ia has a different extinction law (R_V = 1.8) than that in the Milky Way (where R_V = 3.1), or that there is an additional intrinsic color term with luminosity for SNe Ia independent of the decline rate.
  • A detailed study spanning approximately a year has been conducted on the Type Ib supernova 2007Y. Imaging was obtained from X-ray to radio wavelengths, and a comprehensive set of multi-band (w2m2w1u'g'r'i'UBVYJHKs) light curves and optical spectroscopy is presented. A virtually complete bolometric light curve is derived, from which we infer a (56)Ni-mass of 0.06 M_sun. The early spectrum strongly resembles SN 2005bf and exhibits high-velocity features of CaII and H_alpha; during late epochs the spectrum shows evidence of a ejecta-wind interaction. Nebular emission lines have similar widths and exhibit profiles that indicate a lack of major asymmetry in the ejecta. Late phase spectra are modeled with a non-LTE code, from which we find (56)Ni, O and total-ejecta masses (excluding He) to be 0.06, 0.2 and 0.42 M_sun, respectively, below 4,500 km/s. The (56)Ni mass confirms results obtained from the bolometric light curve. The oxygen abundance suggests the progenitor was most likely a ~3.3 M_sun He core star that evolved from a zero-age-main-sequence mass of 10-13 M_sun. The explosion energy is determined to be ~10^50 erg, and the mass-loss rate of the progenitor is constrained from X-ray and radio observations to be <~10^-6 M_sun/yr. SN 2007Y is among the least energetic normal Type Ib supernovae ever studied.
  • Traditionally, the distance to NGC 4038/39 has been derived from the systemic recession velocity, yielding about 20 Mpc for H_0 = 72 km/s/Mpc. Recently, this widely adopted distance has been challenged based on photometry of the presumed tip of the red giant branch (TRGB), which seems to yield a shorter distance of 13.3+-1.0 Mpc and, with it, nearly 1 mag lower luminosities and smaller radii for objects in this prototypical merger. Here we present a new distance estimate based on observations of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2007sr in the southern tail, made at Las Campanas Observatory as part of the Carnegie Supernova Project. The resulting distance of D(SN Ia) = 22.3+-2.8 Mpc [(m-M)_0 = 31.74+-0.27 mag] is in good agreement with a refined distance estimate based on the recession velocity and the large-scale flow model developed by Tonry and collaborators, D(flow) = 22.5+-2.8 Mpc. We point out three serious problems that a short distance of 13.3 Mpc would entail, and trace the claimed short distance to a likely misidentification of the TRGB. Reanalyzing Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data in the Archive with an improved method, we find a TRGB fainter by 0.9 mag and derive from it a preliminary new TRGB distance of D(TRGB) = 20.0+-1.6 Mpc. Finally, assessing our three distance estimates we recommend using a conservative, rounded value of D = 22+-3 Mpc as the best currently available distance to The Antennae.