• Although foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) incidence has decreased in South America over the last years, the pathogen still circulates in the region and the risk of re-emergence in previously FMDV-free areas is a veterinary public health concern. In this paper we merge environmental, epidemiological and genetic data to reconstruct spatiotemporal patterns and determinants of FMDV serotypes A and O dispersal in South America. Our dating analysis suggests that serotype A emerged in South America around 1930, while serotype O emerged around 1990. The rate of evolution for serotype A was significantly higher compared to serotype O. Phylogeographic inference identified two well-connected sub networks of viral flow, one including Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador; another including Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina. The spread of serotype A was best described by geographic distances, while trade of live cattle was the predictor that best explained serotype O spread. Our findings show that the two serotypes have different underlying evolutionary and spatial dynamics and may pose different threats to control programmes. Key-words: Phylogeography, foot-and-mouth disease virus, South America, animal trade.
  • Quantifying the attack ratio of disease is key to epidemiological inference and Public Health planning. For multi-serotype pathogens, however, different levels of serotype-specific immunity make it difficult to assess the population at risk. In this paper we propose a Bayesian method for estimation of the attack ratio of an epidemic and the initial fraction of susceptibles using aggregated incidence data. We derive the probability distribution of the effective reproductive number, R t , and use MCMC to obtain posterior distributions of the parameters of a single-strain SIR transmission model with time-varying force of infection. Our method is showcased in a data set consisting of 18 years of dengue incidence in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We demonstrate that it is possible to learn about the initial fraction of susceptibles and the attack ratio even in the absence of serotype specific data. On the other hand, the information provided by this approach is limited, stressing the need for detailed serological surveys to characterise the distribution of serotype-specific immunity in the population.
  • Background: Simulated nucleotide or amino acid sequences are frequently used to assess the performance of phylogenetic reconstruction methods. BEAST, a Bayesian statistical framework that focuses on reconstructing time-calibrated molecular evolutionary processes, supports a wide array of evolutionary models, but lacked matching machinery for simulation of character evolution along phylogenies. Results: We present a flexible Monte Carlo simulation tool, called piBUSS, that employs the BEAGLE high performance library for phylogenetic computations within BEAST to rapidly generate large sequence alignments under complex evolutionary models. piBUSS sports a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows combining a rich array of models across an arbitrary number of partitions. A command-line interface mirrors the options available through the GUI and facilitates scripting in large-scale simulation studies. Analogous to BEAST model and analysis setup, more advanced simulation options are supported through an extensible markup language (XML) specification, which in addition to generating sequence output, also allows users to combine simulation and analysis in a single BEAST run. Conclusions: piBUSS offers a unique combination of flexibility and ease-of-use for sequence simulation under realistic evolutionary scenarios. Through different interfaces, piBUSS supports simulation studies ranging from modest endeavors for illustrative purposes to complex and large-scale assessments of evolutionary inference procedures. The software aims at implementing new models and data types that are continuously being developed as part of BEAST/BEAGLE.