• Modern radio telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will probe the radio sky over large fields-of-view, which results in large w-modulations of the sky image. This effect complicates the relationship between the measured visibilities and the image under scrutiny. In algorithmic terms, it gives rise to massive memory and computational time requirements. Yet, it can be a blessing in terms of reconstruction quality of the sky image. In recent years, several works have shown that large w-modulations promote the spread spectrum effect. Within the compressive sensing framework, this effect increases the incoherence between the sensing basis and the sparsity basis of the signal to be recovered, leading to better estimation of the sky image. In this article, we revisit the w-projection approach using convex optimisation in realistic settings, where the measurement operator couples the w-terms in Fourier and the de-gridding kernels. We provide sparse, thus fast, models of the Fourier part of the measurement operator through adaptive sparsification procedures. Consequently, memory requirements and computational cost are significantly alleviated, at the expense of introducing errors on the radio-interferometric data model. We present a first investigation of the impact of the sparse variants of the measurement operator on the image reconstruction quality. We finally analyse the interesting super-resolution potential associated with the spread spectrum effect of the w-modulation, and showcase it through simulations. Our C++ code is available online on GitHub.
  • Next-generation radio interferometers, such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will revolutionise our understanding of the universe through their unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. However, standard methods in radio interferometry produce reconstructed interferometric images that are limited in quality and they are not scalable for big data. In this work we apply and evaluate alternative interferometric reconstruction methods that make use of state-of-the-art sparse image reconstruction algorithms motivated by compressive sensing, which have been implemented in the PURIFY software package. In particular, we implement and apply the proximal alternating direction method of multipliers (P-ADMM) algorithm presented in a recent article. We apply PURIFY to real interferometric observations. For all observations PURIFY outperforms the standard CLEAN, where in some cases PURIFY provides an improvement in dynamic range by over an order of magnitude. The latest version of PURIFY, which includes the developments presented in this work, is made publicly available.
  • Next-generation radio interferometers, such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will revolutionise our understanding of the universe through their unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. However, to realise these goals significant challenges in image and data processing need to be overcome. The standard methods in radio interferometry for reconstructing images, such as CLEAN and its variants, have served the community well over the last few decades and have survived largely because they are pragmatic. However, they produce reconstructed interferometric images that are limited in quality and they are not scalable for big data. In this work we apply and evaluate alternative interferometric reconstruction methods that make use of state-of-the-art sparse image reconstruction algorithms motivated by compressive sensing, which have been implemented in the PURIFY software package. In particular, we implement and apply the proximal alternating direction method of multipliers (P-ADMM) algorithm presented in a recent article. First, we assess the impact of the interpolation kernel used to perform gridding and degridding on sparse image reconstruction. We find that the Kaiser-Bessel interpolation kernel performs as well as prolate spheroidal wave functions, while providing a computational saving and an analytic form. Second, we apply PURIFY to real interferometric observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We find that for all observations PURIFY outperforms CLEAN, where in some cases PURIFY provides an improvement in dynamic range by over an order of magnitude. Third, we discuss how images reconstructed by PURIFY exhibit addition advantages over those recovered by CLEAN. The latest version of PURIFY, which includes the developments presented in this work, is made publicly available.
  • We investigate the possible presence of diffuse radio emission in the intermediate redshift, massive cluster PLCK G285.0-23.7 (z=0.39, M_500 = 8.39 x 10^(14) M_Sun). Our 16cm-band ATCA observations of PLCK G285.0-23.7 allow us to reach a rms noise level of ~11 microJy/beam on the wide-band (1.1-3.1 GHz), full-resolution (~5 arcsec) image of the cluster, making it one of the deepest ATCA images yet published. We also re-image visibilities at lower resolution in order to achieve a better sensitivity to low-surface-brightness extended radio sources. We detect one of the lowest luminosity radio halos known at z>0.35, characterised by a slight offset from the well-studied 1.4 GHz radio power vs. cluster mass correlation. Similarly to most known radio-loud clusters (i.e. those hosting diffuse non-thermal sources), PLCK G285.0-23.7 has a disturbed dynamical state. Our analysis reveals a similarly elongated X-ray and radio morphology. While the size of the radio halo in PLCK G285.0-23.7 is smaller than lower redshift radio-loud clusters in the same mass range, it shows a similar correlation with the cluster virial radius, as expected in the framework of hierarchical structure formation.
  • Interferometric radio astronomy data require the effects of limited coverage in the Fourier plane to be accounted for via a deconvolution process. For the last 40 years this process, known as `cleaning', has been performed almost exclusively on all Stokes parameters individually as if they were independent scalar images. However, here we demonstrate for the case of the linear polarisation $\mathcal{P}$, this approach fails to properly account for the complex vector nature resulting in a process which is dependant on the axis under which the deconvolution is performed. We present here an improved method, `Generalised Complex CLEAN', which properly accounts for the complex vector nature of polarised emission and is invariant under rotations of the deconvolution axis. We use two Australia Telescope Compact Array datasets to test standard and complex CLEAN versions of the H\"{o}gbom and SDI CLEAN algorithms. We show that in general the Complex CLEAN version of each algorithm produces more accurate clean components with fewer spurious detections and lower computation cost due to reduced iterations than the current methods. In particular we find that the Complex SDI CLEAN produces the best results for diffuse polarised sources as compared with standard CLEAN algorithms and other Complex CLEAN algorithms. Given the move to widefield, high resolution polarimetric imaging with future telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array, we suggest that Generalised Complex CLEAN should be adopted as the deconvolution method for all future polarimetric surveys and in particular that the complex version of a SDI CLEAN should be used.
  • We know that magnetic fields are pervasive across all scales in the Universe and over all of cosmic time and yet our understanding of many of the properties of magnetic fields is still limited. We do not yet know when, where or how the first magnetic fields in the Universe were formed, nor do we fully understand their role in fundamental processes such as galaxy formation or cosmic ray acceleration or how they influence the evolution of astrophysical objects. The greatest challenge to addressing these issues has been a lack of deep, broad bandwidth polarimetric data over large areas of the sky. The Square Kilometre Array will radically improve this situation via an all-sky polarisation survey that delivers both high quality polarisation imaging in combination with observations of 7-14 million extragalactic rotation measures. Here we summarise how this survey will improve our understanding of a range of astrophysical phenomena on scales from individual Galactic objects to the cosmic web.
  • (abridged) Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations. We vary our assumptions about the data, showing that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m^2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly constrained by the data in most cases.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of the radio galaxy PKS J0334-3900 at the centre of Abell 3135. The spectro-polarimetric radio observations are combined with spectroscopic optical and X-ray data to illustrate the use of Head-Tail radio galaxies to reveal properties of the intracluster medium. ATCA observations at 1.4, 2.5, 4.6 & 8.6 GHz are presented with a detailed analysis of the morphology and spectral indices giving physical parameters to constrain the dynamical history of the galaxy. Using these constraints we produce a simulation of PKS J0334-3900. We find that this Head-Tail morphology can be induced via a combination of orbital motion due to a binary companion and relative motion through the ICM. New Chandra images of A3135 are presented from which we obtain a cluster electron density of n_(e,0) = (1.06 +/- 0.11 x 10^(-3) cm^(-3), a global temperature of 2.4 ^(+0.51)_(-0.38) keV and a lower limit to the radio jet power of PKS J0334-3900 of 1.6 x 10^(44) erg/s. A new redshift analysis of the cluster from available spectroscopic data shows A3135 to be comprised of galaxies with 0.058 < z < 0.066 and gives a new mean cluster redshift of 0.06228 +/- 0.00015. We also uncovered a background subgroup between 0.066 < z < 0.070. Stokes Q and U data of Abell 3135 were used to obtain rotation measure values along the line of sight to PKS J0334-3900. Using our simulation we are able to infer the distance between the jets to be 154 +/- 16 kpc, which when combined with the difference in rotation measure between the jets provides a novel new way to estimate the average magnetic field within a cluster. A lower limit to the cluster B-field was calculated to be 0.09 +/- 0.03 micro Gauss. We show observations of Head-Tail galaxies can be used to infer information on the cluster environment, showing them to be an important class of objects in next generation all sky surveys.