• We study structural and electronic properties of graphene grown on SiC substrate using scanning tunneling microscope (STM), spot-profile-analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED) and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We find several new replicas of Dirac cones in the Brillouin zone (BZ). Their locations can be understood in terms of combination of basis vectors linked to SiC 6x6 and graphene 6xsqrt(3) x 6sqrt(3) reconstruction. Therefore these new features originate from the Moie caused by the lattice mismatch between SiC and graphene. More specifically, Dirac cones replicas are caused by underlying weak modulation of the ionic potential by the substrate that is then experienced by the electrons in the graphene. We also demonstrate that this effect is equally strong in single and tri-layer graphene, therefore the additional Dirac cones are intrinsic features rather than result of photoelectron diffraction. These new features in the electronic structure are very important for the interpretation of recent transport measurements and can assist in tuning the properties of graphene for practical applications.
  • We use high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and electronic structure calculations to study the electronic properties of rare-earth monoantimonides RSb (R = Y, Ce, Gd, Dy, Ho, Tm, Lu). The experimentally measured Fermi surface (FS) of RSb consists of at least two concentric hole pockets at the $\Gamma$ point and two intersecting electron pockets at the $X$ point. These data agree relatively well with the electronic structure calculations. Detailed photon energy dependence measurements using both synchrotron and laser ARPES systems indicate that there is at least one Fermi surface sheet with strong three-dimensionality centered at the $\Gamma$ point. Due to the "lanthanide contraction", the unit cell of different rare-earth monoantimonides shrinks when changing rare-earth ion from CeSb to LuSb. This results in the differences in the chemical potentials in these compounds, which is demonstrated by both ARPES measurements and electronic structure calculations. Interestingly, in CeSb, the intersecting electron pockets at the $X$ point seem to be touching the valence bands, forming a four-fold degenerate Dirac-like feature. On the other hand, the remaining rare-earth monoantimonides show significant gaps between the upper and lower bands at the $X$ point. Furthermore, similar to the previously reported results of LaBi, a Dirac-like structure was observed at the $\Gamma$ point in YSb, CeSb, and GdSb, compounds showing relatively high magnetoresistance. This Dirac-like structure may contribute to the unusually large magnetoresistance in these compounds.
  • We use temperature- and field-dependent resistivity measurements [Shubnikov--de Haas (SdH) quantum oscillations] and ultrahigh resolution, tunable, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the three-dimensionality (3D) of the bulk electronic structure in WTe2, a type-II Weyl semimetal. The bulk Fermi surface (FS) consists of two pairs of electron pockets and two pairs of hole pockets along the X-Gamma-X direction as detected by using an incident photon energy of 6.7 eV, which is consistent with the previously reported data. However, if using an incident photon energy of 6.36 eV, another pair of tiny electron pockets is detected on both sides of the Gamma point, which is in agreement with the small quantum oscillation frequency peak observed in the magnetoresistance. Therefore, the bulk, 3D FS consists of three pairs of electron pockets and two pairs of hole pockets in total. With the ability of fine tuning the incident photon energy, we demonstrate the strong three-dimensionality of the bulk electronic structure in WTe2. The combination of resistivity and ARPES measurements reveal the complete, and consistent, picture of the bulk electronic structure of this material.
  • Systematic measurements of temperature dependent magnetization, resistivity and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) at ambient pressure as well as resistivity under pressures up to 5.25 GPa were conducted on single crystals of CrAuTe$_4$. Magnetization data suggest that magnetic moments are aligned antiferromagnetically along the crystallographic $c$-axis below $T_\textrm{N}$ = 255 K. ARPES measurements show band reconstruction due to the magnetic ordering. Magnetoresistance data show clear anisotropy, and, at high fields, quantum oscillations. The Neel temperature decreases monotonically under pressure, decreasing to $T_\textrm{N}$ = 236 K at 5.22 GPa. The pressure dependencies of (i) $T_\textrm{N}$, (ii) the residual resistivity ratio, and (iii) the size and power-law behavior of the low temperature magnetoresistance all show anomalies near 2 GPa suggesting that there may be a phase transition (structural, magnetic, and/or electronic) induced by pressure. For pressures higher than 2 GPa a significantly different quantum oscillation frequency emerges, consistent with a pressure induced change in the electronic states.
  • We use our high resolution He-lamp based, tunable laser-based ARPES measurements and density functional theory calculations to study the electronic properties of LaBi, a binary system that was proposed to be a member of a new family of topological semimetals. Both bulk and surface bands are present in the spectra. The dispersion of the surface state is highly unusual. It resembles a Dirac cone, but upon closer inspection we can clearly detect an energy gap. The bottom band follows roughly a parabolic dispersion. The dispersion of the top band remains very linear, "V" shape like, with the tip approaching very closely to the extrapolated location of Dirac point. Such asymmetric mass acquisition is highly unusual and opens a possibility of a new topological phenomena that has yet to be understood.
  • It has recently been proposed that electronic band structures in crystals give rise to a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion, which violates Lorentz invariance and, consequently, is forbidden in particle physics. It was further predicted that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ may realize such a Type II Weyl fermion. One crucial challenge is that the Weyl points in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ are predicted to lie above the Fermi level. Here, by studying a simple model for a Type II Weyl cone, we clarify the importance of accessing the unoccupied band structure to demonstrate that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ is a Weyl semimetal. Then, we use pump-probe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES) to directly observe the unoccupied band structure of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. For the first time, we directly access states $> 0.2$ eV above the Fermi level. By comparing our results with $\textit{ab initio}$ calculations, we conclude that we directly observe the surface state containing the topological Fermi arc. Our work opens the way to studying the unoccupied band structure as well as the time-domain relaxation dynamics of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ and related transition metal dichalcogenides.
  • We use ultrahigh resolution, tunable, vacuum ultraviolet laser angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the electronic properties of WTe$_2$, a material that was predicted to be a type-II Weyl semimetal. The Weyl fermion states in WTe2 were proposed to emerge at the crossing points of electron and hole pockets; and Fermi arcs connecting electron and hole pockets would be visible in the spectral function on (001) surface. Here we report the observation of such Fermi arcs in WTe2 confirming the theoretical predictions. This provides strong evidence for type-II Weyl semimetallic states in WTe2.
  • In a type I Dirac or Weyl semimetal, the low energy states are squeezed to a single point in momentum space when the chemical potential Ef is tuned precisely to the Dirac/Weyl point. Recently, a type II Weyl semimetal was predicted to exist, where the Weyl states connect hole and electron bands, separated by an indirect gap. This leads to unusual energy states, where hole and electron pockets touch at the Weyl point. Here we present the discovery of a type II topological Weyl semimetal (TWS) state in pure MoTe2, where two sets of WPs (W2+-, W3+-) exist at the touching points of electron and hole pockets and are located at different binding energies above Ef. Using ARPES, modeling, DFT and calculations of Berry curvature, we identify the Weyl points and demonstrate that they are connected by different sets of Fermi arcs for each of the two surface terminations. We also find new surface "track states" that form closed loops and are unique to type II Weyl semimetals. This material provides an exciting, new platform to study the properties of Weyl fermions.
  • In topological quantum materials the conduction and valence bands are connected at points (Dirac/Weyl semimetals) or along lines (Line Node semimetals) in the momentum space. Numbers of studies demonstrated that several materials are indeed Dirac/Weyl semimetals. However, there is still no experimental confirmation of materials with line nodes, in which the Dirac nodes form closed loops in the momentum space. Here we report the discovery of a novel topological structure - Dirac node arcs - in the ultrahigh magnetoresistive material PtSn4 using laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Unlike the closed loops of line nodes, the Dirac node arc structure resembles the Dirac dispersion in graphene that is extended along one dimension in momentum space and confined by band gaps on either end. We propose that this reported Dirac node arc structure is a novel topological state that provides a novel platform for studying the exotic properties of Dirac Fermions.
  • We investigate the effect of isotope substitution on the electron-phonon interaction in the multi-band superconductor MgB2 using tunable laser based Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy. The kink structure around 70 meV in the $\sigma$ band, which is caused by electron coupling to the E2g phonon mode, is shifted to higher binding energy by ~3.5 meV in Mg(10)B2 and the shift is not affected by superconducting transition. These results serve as the benchmark for investigations of isotope effects in known, unconventional superconductors and newly discovered superconductors where the origin of pairing is unknown.
  • Weyl semimetals have sparked intense research interest, but experimental work has been limited to the TaAs family of compounds. Recently, a number of theoretical works have predicted that compounds in the Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ series are Weyl semimetals. Such proposals are particularly exciting because Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ has a quasi two-dimensional crystal structure well-suited to many transport experiments, while WTe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ have already been the subject of numerous proposals for device applications. However, with available ARPES techniques it is challenging to demonstrate a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. According to the predictions, the Weyl points are above the Fermi level, the system approaches two critical points as a function of doping, there are many irrelevant bulk bands, the Fermi arcs are nearly degenerate with bulk bands and the bulk band gap is small. Here, we study Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ for $x = 0.07$ and 0.45 using pump-probe ARPES. The system exhibits a dramatic response to the pump laser and we successfully access states $> 0.2$eV above the Fermi level. For the first time, we observe direct, experimental signatures of Fermi arcs in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$, which agree well with theoretical calculations of the surface states. However, we caution that the interpretation of these features depends sensitively on free parameters in the surface state calculation. We comment on the prospect of conclusively demonstrating a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$.
  • We study magnetic domains in Nd2Fe14B single crystals using high resolution magnetic force mi- croscopy (MFM). Previous MFM studies and small angle neutron scattering experiments suggested the presence of nano-scale domains in addition to optically detected micrometer-scale ones. We find, in addition to the elongated, wavy nano-domains reported by a previous MFM study, that the micrometer size, star shape fractal pattern is constructed of an elongated network of nano-domains ~20 nm in width, with resolution-limited domain walls thinner than 2 nm. While the microscopic domains exhibit significant resilience to an external magnetic field, some of the nano-domains are sensitive to the magnetic field of the MFM tip.
  • We report the discovery of Weyl semimetal NbAs featuring topological Fermi arc surface states.
  • We use ultra-high resolution, tunable, VUV laser-based, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and temperature and field dependent resistivity and thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements to study the electronic properties of WTe2, a compound that manifests exceptionally large, temperature dependent magnetoresistance. The temperature dependence of the TEP shows a change of slope at T=175 K and the Kohler rule breaks down above 70-140 K range. The Fermi surface consists of two electron pockets and two pairs of hole pockets along the X-Gamma-X direction. Upon increase of temperature from 40K, the hole pockets gradually sink below the chemical potential. Like BaFe2As2, WTe2 has clear and substantial changes in its Fermi surface driven by modest changes in temperature. In WTe2, this leads to a rare example of temperature induced Lifshitz transition, associated with the complete disappearance of the hole pockets. These dramatic changes of the electronic structure naturally explain unusual features of the transport data.
  • We have developed an angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer with tunable VUV laser as a photon source. The photon source is based on the fourth harmonic generation of a near IR beam from a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a CW green laser and tunable between 5.3eV and 7eV. The most important part of the set-up is a compact, vacuum enclosed fourth harmonic generator based on KBBF crystals, grown hydrothermally in the US. This source can deliver a photon flux of over 10^14 photons/s. We demonstrate that this energy range is sufficient to measure the kz dispersion in an iron arsenic high temperature superconductor, which was previously only possible at synchrotron facilities.