• The Seyfert 1 galaxy Arp 151 was monitored as part of three reverberation mapping campaigns spanning $2008-2015$. We present modeling of these velocity-resolved reverberation mapping datasets using a geometric and dynamical model for the broad line region (BLR). By modeling each of the three datasets independently, we infer the evolution of the BLR structure in Arp 151 over a total of seven years and constrain the systematic uncertainties in non-varying parameters such as the black hole mass. We find that the BLR geometry of a thick disk viewed close to face-on is stable over this time, although the size of the BLR grows by a factor of $\sim 2$. The dynamics of the BLR are dominated by inflow and the inferred black hole mass is consistent for the three datasets, despite the increase in BLR size. Combining the inference for the three datasets yields a black hole mass and statistical uncertainty of $\log_{10}($M$_{\rm BH}/\rm{M}_{\odot})=6.82^{+0.09}_{-0.09}$ with a standard deviation in individual measurements of 0.13 dex.
  • A far-infrared observatory such as the {\it SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics} ({\it SPICA}), with its unprecedented spectroscopic sensitivity, would unveil the role of feedback in galaxy evolution during the last $\sim10$ Gyr of the Universe ($z=1.5-2$), through the use of far- and mid-infrared molecular and ionic fine structure lines that trace outflowing and infalling gas. Outflowing gas is identified in the far-infrared through P-Cygni line shapes and absorption blueshifted wings in molecular lines with high dipolar moments, and through emission line wings of fine-structure lines of ionized gas. We quantify the detectability of galaxy-scale massive molecular and ionized outflows as a function of redshift in AGN-dominated, starburst-dominated, and main-sequence galaxies, explore the detectability of metal-rich inflows in the local Universe, and describe the most significant synergies with other current and future observatories that will measure feedback in galaxies via complementary tracers at other wavelengths.
  • IR spectroscopy in the range 12-230 micron with the SPace IR telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will reveal the physical processes that govern the formation and evolution of galaxies and black holes through cosmic time, bridging the gap between the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the new generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) at shorter wavelengths and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at longer wavelengths. SPICA, with its 2.5-m telescope actively-cooled to below 8K, will obtain the first spectroscopic determination, in the mid-IR rest-frame, of both the star-formation rate and black hole accretion rate histories of galaxies, reaching lookback times of 12 Gyr, for large statistically significant samples. Densities, temperatures, radiation fields and gas-phase metallicities will be measured in dust-obscured galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN), sampling a large range in mass and luminosity, from faint local dwarf galaxies to luminous quasars in the distant Universe. AGN and starburst feedback and feeding mechanisms in distant galaxies will be uncovered through detailed measurements of molecular and atomic line profiles. SPICA's large-area deep spectrophotometric surveys will provide mid-IR spectra and continuum fluxes for unbiased samples of tens of thousands of galaxies, out to redshifts of z~6. Furthermore, SPICA spectroscopy will uncover the most luminous galaxies in the first few hundred million years of the Universe, through their characteristic dust and molecular hydrogen features.
  • L. Pei, M. M. Fausnaugh, A. J. Barth, B. M. Peterson, M. C. Bentz, G. De Rosa, K. D. Denney, M. R. Goad, C. S. Kochanek, K. T. Korista, G. A. Kriss, R. W. Pogge, V. N. Bennert, M. Brotherton, K. I. Clubb, E. Dalla Bontà, A. V. Filippenko, J. E. Greene, C. J. Grier, M. Vestergaard, W. Zheng, Scott M. Adams, Thomas G. Beatty, A. Bigley, Jacob E. Brown, Jonathan S. Brown, G. Canalizo, J. M. Comerford, Carl T. Coker, E. M. Corsini, S. Croft, K. V. Croxall, A. J. Deason, Michael Eracleous, O. D. Fox, E. L. Gates, C. B. Henderson, E. Holmbeck, T. W.-S. Holoien, J. J. Jensen, C. A. Johnson, P. L. Kelly, S. Kim, A. King, M. W. Lau, Miao Li, Cassandra Lochhaas, Zhiyuan Ma, E. R. Manne-Nicholas, J. C. Mauerhan, M. A. Malkan, R. McGurk, L. Morelli, Ana Mosquera, Dale Mudd, F. Muller Sanchez, M. L. Nguyen, P. Ochner, B. Ou-Yang, A. Pancoast, Matthew T. Penny, A. Pizzella, Radosław Poleski, Jessie Runnoe, B. Scott, Jaderson S. Schimoia, B. J. Shappee, I. Shivvers, Gregory V. Simonian, A. Siviero, Garrett Somers, Daniel J. Stevens, M. A. Strauss, Jamie Tayar, N. Tejos, T. Treu, J. Van Saders, L. Vican, S. Villanueva Jr., H. Yuk, N. L. Zakamska, W. Zhu, M. D. Anderson, P. Arévalo, C. Bazhaw, S. Bisogni, G. A. Borman, M. C. Bottorff, W. N. Brandt, A. A. Breeveld, E. M. Cackett, M. T. Carini, D. M. Crenshaw, A. De Lorenzo-Cáceres, M. Dietrich, R. Edelson, N. V. Efimova, J. Ely, P. A. Evans, G. J. Ferland, K. Flatland, N. Gehrels, S. Geier, J. M. Gelbord, D. Grupe, A. Gupta, P. B. Hall, S. Hicks, D. Horenstein, Keith Horne, T. Hutchison, M. Im, M. D. Joner, J. Jones, J. Kaastra, S. Kaspi, B. C. Kelly, J. A. Kennea, M. Kim, S. C. Kim, S. A. Klimanov, J. C. Lee, D. C. Leonard, P. Lira, F. MacInnis, S. Mathur, I. M. McHardy, C. Montouri, R. Musso, S. V. Nazarov, H. Netzer, R. P. Norris, J. A. Nousek, D. N. Okhmat, I. Papadakis, J. R. Parks, J.-U. Pott, S. E. Rafter, H.-W. Rix, D. A. Saylor, K. Schnülle, S. G. Sergeev, M. Siegel, A. Skielboe, M. Spencer, D. Starkey, H.-I. Sung, K. G. Teems, C. S. Turner, P. Uttley, C. Villforth, Y. Weiss, J.-H. Woo, H. Yan, S. Young, Y. Zu
    Feb. 3, 2017 astro-ph.GA
    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic monitoring program targeting NGC 5548 as part of a larger multi-wavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The campaign spanned six months and achieved an almost daily cadence with observations from five ground-based telescopes. The H$\beta$ and He II $\lambda$4686 broad emission-line light curves lag that of the 5100 $\AA$ optical continuum by $4.17^{+0.36}_{-0.36}$ days and $0.79^{+0.35}_{-0.34}$ days, respectively. The H$\beta$ lag relative to the 1158 $\AA$ ultraviolet continuum light curve measured by the Hubble Space Telescope is roughly $\sim$50% longer than that measured against the optical continuum, and the lag difference is consistent with the observed lag between the optical and ultraviolet continua. This suggests that the characteristic radius of the broad-line region is $\sim$50% larger than the value inferred from optical data alone. We also measured velocity-resolved emission-line lags for H$\beta$ and found a complex velocity-lag structure with shorter lags in the line wings, indicative of a broad-line region dominated by Keplerian motion. The responses of both the H$\beta$ and He II $\lambda$4686 emission lines to the driving continuum changed significantly halfway through the campaign, a phenomenon also observed for C IV, Ly $\alpha$, He II(+O III]), and Si IV(+O IV]) during the same monitoring period. Finally, given the optical luminosity of NGC 5548 during our campaign, the measured H$\beta$ lag is a factor of five shorter than the expected value implied by the $R_\mathrm{BLR} - L_\mathrm{AGN}$ relation based on the past behavior of NGC 5548.
  • We used narrowband interference filters with the CCD imaging camera on the Nickel 1.0 meter telescope at Lick Observatory to observe 31 nearby (z < 0.03) Seyfert galaxies in the 12 {\mu}m Active Galaxy Sample. We obtained pure emission line images of each galaxy in order to separate H{\alpha} emission from the nucleus from that of the host galaxy. The extended H{\alpha} emission is expected to be powered by newly formed hot stars, and correlates well with other indicators of current star formation in these galaxies: 7.7 {\mu}m PAH, far-infrared, and radio luminosity. Relative to what would be expected from recent star formation, there is a 0.8 dex excess of radio emission in our Seyfert galaxies. The nuclear H{\alpha} luminosity is dominated by the AGN, and is correlated with the hard X-ray luminosity. There is an upward offset of 1 dex in this correlation for the Seyfert 1s due to a strong contribution from the Broad Line Region. We found a correlation between star formation rate and AGN luminosity. In spite of selection effects, we concluded that the absence of bright Seyfert nuclei in galaxies with low SFRs is real, albeit only weakly significant. We used our measured spatial distributions of H{\alpha} emission to determine what these Seyfert galaxies would look like when observed through fixed apertures at high redshifts. Although all would be detectable emission line galaxies at any redshift, most would appear dominated by HII region emission. Only the most luminous AGN would still be identified at z~0.3.
  • We present data products from the 300 ks Chandra survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) deep field. This field has a unique set of 9-band infrared photometry covering 2-24 micron from the AKARI Infrared Camera, including mid-infrared (MIR) bands not covered by Spitzer. The survey is one of the deepest ever achieved at ~15 micron, and is by far the widest among those with similar depths in the MIR. This makes this field unique for the MIR-selection of AGN at z~1. We design a source detection procedure, which performs joint Maximum Likelihood PSF fits on all of our 15 mosaicked Chandra pointings covering an area of 0.34 square degree. The procedure has been highly optimized and tested by simulations. We provide a point source catalog with photometry and Bayesian-based 90 per cent confidence upper limits in the 0.5-7, 0.5-2, 2-7, 2-4, and 4-7 keV bands. The catalog contains 457 X-ray sources and the spurious fraction is estimated to be ~1.7 per cent. Sensitivity and 90 per cent confidence upper flux limits maps in all bands are provided as well. We search for optical MIR counterparts in the central 0.25 square degree, where deep Subaru Suprime-Cam multiband images exist. Among the 377 X-ray sources detected there, ~80 per cent have optical counterparts and ~60 per cent also have AKARI mid-IR counterparts. We cross-match our X-ray sources with MIR-selected AGN from Hanami et al. (2012). Around 30 per cent of all AGN that have MID-IR SEDs purely explainable by AGN activity are strong Compton-thick AGN candidates.
  • In the Spring of 2011 we carried out a 2.5 month reverberation mapping campaign using the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory, monitoring 15 low-redshift Seyfert 1 galaxies. This paper describes the observations, reductions and measurements, and data products from the spectroscopic campaign. The reduced spectra were fitted with a multicomponent model in order to isolate the contributions of various continuum and emission-line components. We present light curves of broad emission lines and the AGN continuum, and measurements of the broad H-beta line widths in mean and root-mean square (rms) spectra. For the most highly variable AGNs we also measured broad H-beta line widths and velocity centroids from the nightly spectra. In four AGNs exhibiting the highest variability amplitudes, we detect anticorrelations between broad H-beta width and luminosity, demonstrating that the broad-line region "breathes" on short timescales of days to weeks in response to continuum variations. We also find that broad H-beta velocity centroids can undergo substantial changes in response to continuum variations; in NGC 4593 the broad H-beta velocity shifted by ~250 km/s over a one-month duration. This reverberation-induced velocity shift effect is likely to contribute a significant source of confusion noise to binary black hole searches that use multi-epoch quasar spectroscopy to detect binary orbital motion. We also present results from simulations that examine biases that can occur in measurement of broad-line widths from rms spectra due to the contributions of continuum variations and photon-counting noise.
  • The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Large Program, which will obtain 140 orbits of grism spectroscopy of the core and infall regions of 10 galaxy clusters, selected to be among the very best cosmic telescopes. Extensive HST imaging is available from many sources including the CLASH and Frontier Fields programs. We introduce the survey by analyzing spectra of faint multiply-imaged galaxies and $z\gtrsim6$ galaxy candidates obtained from the first seven orbits out of fourteen targeting the core of the Frontier Fields cluster MACS0717.5+3745. Using the G102 and G141 grisms to cover the wavelength range 0.8-1.7$\mu$m, we confirm 4 strongly lensed systems by detecting emission lines in each of the images. For the 9 $z\gtrsim6$ galaxy candidates clear from contamination, we do not detect any emission lines down to a seven-orbit 1$\sigma$ noise level of $\sim$5$\times$10$^{-18}$erg s$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$. Taking lensing magnification into account, our flux sensitivity reaches $\sim$0.2-5$\times$10$^{-18}$erg s$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$. These limits over an uninterrupted wavelength range rule out the possibility that the high-$z$ galaxy candidates are instead strong line emitters at lower redshift. These results show that by means of careful modeling of the background - and with the assistance of lensing magnification - interesting flux limits can be reached for large numbers of objects, avoiding pre-selection and the wavelength restrictions inherent to ground-based multi-slit spectroscopy. These observations confirm the power of slitless HST spectroscopy even in fields as crowded as a cluster core.
  • The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011 observing campaign was carried out over the course of 11 weeks in Spring 2011. Here we present the first results from this program, a measurement of the broad-line reverberation lag in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 50. Combining our data with supplemental observations obtained prior to the start of the main observing campaign, our dataset covers a total duration of 4.5 months. During this time, Mrk 50 was highly variable, exhibiting a maximum variability amplitude of a factor of 4 in the U-band continuum and a factor of 2 in the H-beta line. Using standard cross-correlation techniques, we find that H-beta and H-gamma lag the V-band continuum by tau_cen = 10.64(-0.93,+0.82) and 8.43(-1.28,+1.30) days, respectively, while the lag of He II 4686 is unresolved. The H-beta line exhibits a symmetric velocity-resolved reverberation signature with shorter lags in the high-velocity wings than in the line core, consistent with an origin in a broad-line region dominated by orbital motion rather than infall or outflow. Assuming a virial normalization factor of f=5.25, the virial estimate of the black hole mass is (3.2+-0.5)*10^7 solar masses. These observations demonstrate that Mrk 50 is among the most promising nearby active galaxies for detailed investigations of broad-line region structure and dynamics.
  • With the NEOWISE portion of the \emph{Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} (WISE) project, we have carried out a highly uniform survey of the near-Earth object (NEO) population at thermal infrared wavelengths ranging from 3 to 22 $\mu$m, allowing us to refine estimates of their numbers, sizes, and albedos. The NEOWISE survey detected NEOs the same way whether they were previously known or not, subject to the availability of ground-based follow-up observations, resulting in the discovery of more than 130 new NEOs. The survey's uniformity in sensitivity, observing cadence, and image quality have permitted extrapolation of the 428 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) detected by NEOWISE during the fully cryogenic portion of the WISE mission to the larger population. We find that there are 981$\pm$19 NEAs larger than 1 km and 20,500$\pm$3000 NEAs larger than 100 m. We show that the Spaceguard goal of detecting 90% of all 1 km NEAs has been met, and that the cumulative size distribution is best represented by a broken power law with a slope of 1.32$\pm$0.14 below 1.5 km. This power law slope produces $\sim13,200\pm$1,900 NEAs with $D>$140 m. Although previous studies predict another break in the cumulative size distribution below $D\sim$50-100 m, resulting in an increase in the number of NEOs in this size range and smaller, we did not detect enough objects to comment on this increase. The overall number for the NEA population between 100-1000 m are lower than previous estimates. The numbers of near-Earth comets will be the subject of future work.
  • We measure the evolution of the correlation between black hole mass and host spheroid velocity dispersion over the last 6 billion years, by studying three carefully selected samples of active galaxies at z=0.57, z=0.36 and z<0.1. For all three samples, virial black hole masses are consistently estimated using the line dispersion of H$\beta$ and the continuum luminosity at 5100A or Halpha line luminosity, based on our cross calibration of the broad line region size-luminosity relation. For the z=0.57 sample, new stellar velocity dispersions are measured from high signal-to-noise ratio spectra obtained at the Keck Telescope, while for the two lower redshift samples they are compiled from previous works. Extending our previous result at z=0.36, we find an offset from the local relation, suggesting that for fixed M_{BH}, distant spheroids have on average smaller velocity dispersions than local ones. The measured offset at z=0.57 is d log sigma_{*}=0.12 \pm 0.05\pm 0.06 (or d log M_{BH}=0.50 \pm 0.22\pm 0.25), i.e. d log M_{BH} = (3.1\pm1.5)\log (1+z) + 0.05\pm0.21. This is inconsistent with a tight and non-evolving universal M-sigma relation at the 95%CL
  • We monitored 13 moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei at z=0.36 to measure flux variability, explore feasibility of reverberation mapping, and determine uncertainties on estimating black hole mass from single-epoch data. Spectra and images were obtained with approximately weekly cadence for up to 4 months, using the KAST spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope. In broad band we detect peak-to-peak variations of 9-37% and rms variations of 2-10%. The observed flux variability in the g' band (rest-frame 2800-4000\AA) is consistent with that in the r' band (rest-frame 4000-5200\AA), but with larger amplitude. However, after correcting for stellar light dilution, using Hubble Space Telescope images, we find nuclear variability of 3-24% (rms variation) with similar amplitudes in the g' and r' bands within the errors. Intrinsic flux variability of the H$\beta$ line is also detected at the 3-13% level, after accounting for systematic errors on the spectrophotometry. This demonstrates that a reverberation mapping campaign beyond the local universe can be carried out with a 3-m class telescope, provided that sufficiently long light curves are obtained. Finally, we compare the H$\beta$ FWHM measured from mean spectra with that measured from single-epoch data, and find no bias but an rms scatter of 14%, mostly accounted for by the uncertainty on FWHM measurements. The propagated uncertainty on black hole mass estimates, due to the FWHM measurement errors using low S/N (10--15 per pixel) single-epoch spectra, is 30%.
  • Table 1 in our paper, ApJ 648, 774 (2006) entitled "Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High Energy Gamma-Rays" had erroneous numbers for the coefficients fitting the parametric form for the optical depth of the universe to gamma-rays. The correct values for these parameters as described in the original text are given here in a corrected table for various redshifts for the baseline model (upper row) and fast evolution (lower row) for each individual redshift. The parametric approximation is good for optical depths between 0.01 and 100 and for gamma-ray energies up to ~2 TeV for all redshifts but also for energies up to ~10 TeV for redshifts less than 1.
  • We calculate the flux of neutrinos generated by the propagation of ultra-high energy nuclei over cosmological distances. The propagation takes into account the interactions with cosmic background radiations including the CMB and the most recent estimates of higher energy (infra-red, optical, and ultra violet) backgrounds. We assume that the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) at the source is the same as the observed one at low energies. This assumption fits well the present data at the highest energies. We compare the cosmogenic neutrino flux from mixed composition sources to pure proton sources. We find that the neutrino flux in the mixed composition case has a high energy peak, mainly due to photopion production off CMB photons, of similar shape and amplitude to the proton case. At low energies both composition cases have significant neutrino flux with a peak around 1014.5 eV due to the higher energy backgrounds. The mixed composition case induces a higher flux of neutrinos at energies below 1013 eV due to the neutron decay component that extends down to low energies. Detection of diffuse neutrino fluxes at ultra high energies can strongly constrain the source distribution of UHECR whereas fluxes at lower energies could be used to constrain confinement of VHE and UHE cosmic rays if combined with composition analysis from cosmic ray experiments.
  • We present the properties of Ly Alpha emitters (LAEs) at z = 5.7 in the Subaru Deep Field. A photometric sample of 89 LAE candidates is constructed from narrow-band (NB816) data down to NB816 = 26.0 (AB) in a continuous 725 arcmin^2 area. Spectra of 39 objects satisfying the photometric selection criteria for LAEs were obtained with Subaru and Keck II Telescopes, among which 28 were confirmed LAEs, one was a nearby galaxy, and eight were unclassified. We also obtained spectra of another 24 NB816-excess objects in the field, identifying six additional LAEs. We find that the Ly Alpha luminosity function derived from the photometric sample is reproduced well by a Schechter function with L* = (7.9+3.0-2.2) x 10^42 erg/s and phi* = (6.3+3.0-2.0) x 10^-4 Mpc^-3 for alpha = -1.5 (fixed) over the whole luminosity range of L ~= 3x10^42 - 3x10^43 erg/s. We then measure rest-frame Ly Alpha equivalent widths (EWs) for the confirmed LAEs, to find that the median among the 28 objects satisfying the photometric selection criteria is W_0^i = 233 A. We infer that 30% - 40% of LAEs at z=5.7 exceed W_0^i = 240 A. These large-EW objects probably cannot be accounted for by ordinary star-forming populations with a Salpeter IMF. We also find that LAEs with fainter far-UV luminosities have larger EWs. Finally, we derive the far-UV luminosity function of LAEs down to M_UV ~= -19.6 using the photometric sample, and compare it with that of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). We find that as high as about 80% of LBGs at z ~ 6 have W_0^i >= 100 A, in sharp contrast to lower-z counterparts.
  • We report new spectroscopy of two star-forming galaxies with strong Ly_alpha emission at z=6.03 and z=6.04 in the Subaru Deep Field. These two objects are originally selected as i'-dropouts (i'-z' > 1.5) showing an interesting photometric property, the ``NB921 depression''. The NB921-band (centered at 9196A) magnitude is significantly depressed with respect to the z'-band magnitude. The optical spectra of these two objects exhibit asymmetric emission-lines at lambda_obs ~ 8540A and ~ 8560A, suggesting that these objects are Ly_alpha emitters at z~6. The rest-frame equivalent widths of the Ly_alpha emission of the two objects are 94A and 236A; the latter one is the Ly_alpha emitter with the largest Ly_alpha equivalent width at z > 6 ever spectroscopically confirmed. The spectroscopically measured Ly_alpha fluxes of these two objects are consistent with the interpretation that the NB921 depression is caused by the contribution of the strong Ly_alpha emission to the z'-band flux. Most of the NB921-depressed i'-dropout objects are thought to be strong Ly_alpha emitters at 6.0 < z < 6.5; Galactic L and T dwarfs and NB921-dropout galaxies at z > 6.6 do not dominate the NB921-depressed i'-dropout sample. Thus the NB921-depression method is very useful for finding high-z Ly_alpha emitters with a large Ly_alpha equivalent width over a large redshift range, 6.0 < z < 6.5. Although the broadband-selected sample at z ~ 3 contains only a small fraction of objects with a Ly_alpha equivalent width larger than 100A, the i'-dropout sample of the Subaru Deep Field contains a much larger fraction of such strong Ly_alpha emitters. This may imply a strong evolution of the Ly_alpha equivalent width from z > 6 to z ~ 3.
  • We present a catalog of J-band (1.08 um to 1.35 um) stellar spectra at low resolution (R ~ 400). The targets consist of 105 stars ranging in spectral type from O9.5 to M7 and luminosity classes I through V. The relatively featureless spectra of hot stars, earlier than A4, can be used to remove the atmospheric features which dominate ground-based J-band spectroscopy. We measure equivalent widths for three absorption lines and nine blended features which we identify in the spectra. Using detailed comparison with higher resolution spectra, we demonstrate that low resolution data can be used for stellar classification, since several features depend on the effective temperature and gravity. For example The CN index (1.096 - 1.104 um) decreases with temperature, but the strength of a blended feature at 1.28 um (consisting of primarily P beta) increases. The slope of a star's spectrum can also be used to estimate its effective temperature. The luminosity class of a star correlates with the ratio of the Mg I (1.1831 um) line to a blend of several species at 1.16 um. Using these indicators, a star can be classified to within several subclasses. Fifteen stars with particularly high and low metal abundances are included in the catalog and some spectral dependence on metal abundance is also found.
  • Based on far-infrared spectroscopy of a small sample of nearby infrared-bright and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) with the ISO Long Wavelength Spectrometer, we find a dramatic progression in ionic/atomic fine-structure emission line and molecular/atomic absorption line characteristics in these galaxies extending from strong [O III]52,88 and [N III]57 micron line emission to detection of only faint [C II]158 micron line emission from gas in photodissociation regions in the ULIRGs. The molecular absorption spectra show varying excitation as well, extending from galaxies in which the molecular population mainly occupies the ground state to galaxies in which there is significant population in higher levels. In the case of the prototypical ULIRG, the merger galaxy Arp 220, the spectrum is dominated by absorption lines of OH, H2O, CH, and [O I]. Low [O III]88 micron line flux relative to the integrated far-infrared flux correlates with low excitation and does not appear to be due to far-infrared extinction or to density effects. A progression toward soft radiation fields or very dusty HII regions may explain these effects.
  • Afterglow, or long-lived emission, has now been detected from about a dozen well-positioned gamma-ray bursts. Distance determinations made by measuring optical emission lines from the host galaxy, or absorption lines in the afterglow spectrum, place the burst sources at significant cosmological distances, with redshifts ranging from ~1--3. The energy required to produce the bright gamma-ray flashes is enormous: up to ~10^{53} erg or 10 percent of the rest mass energy of a neutron star, if the emission is isotropic. Here we present the discovery of the optical afterglow and the redshift of GRB 990123, the brightest well-localized GRB to date. With our measured redshift of >1.6, the inferred isotropic energy release exceeds the rest mass of a neutron star thereby challenging current theoretical models for the origin of GRBs. We argue that the optical and IR afterglow measurements reported here may provide the first observational evidence of beaming in a GRB, thereby reducing the required energetics to a level where stellar death models are still tenable.
  • We have compared the morphological characteristics of the 891 galaxies in the Extended 12-micron Sample (E12GS), and assessed the effect of the 12-micron selection criterion on galaxy properties. The normal spirals in the E12GS have the same axial ratios, morphological types, and bar and ring fractions as other normal spirals. The HII/starburst galaxies have a higher incidence of bars, and more than twice the normal rate of "peculiar" morphologies, both of which are attributable to relatively recent disturbances. The galaxies with active nuclei (AGNs: Seyferts and LINERs) have the same incidence of bars as normal spirals, but show rings significantly more often than normal galaxies or starbursts. The LINERs have elevated rates of inner rings, while the Seyferts have outer ring fractions several times those in normal galaxies. The different formation times of bars and rings suggest an interpretation of these differences. Bars form relatively quickly, and indicate that material is recently being transported (by redistribution of angular momentum) to the center of the galaxy, where it is likely to trigger a short (e.g., $\lesssim 10^8$ yrs) burst of star formation. Outer rings may result from similar disturbances, but require much more time to form, while inner rings form in a shorter time, more comparable to bars. Thus it may be that after an interaction or instability triggers an infall of gas, the galaxy in the earliest stage is likely to show enhanced star formation in its center, while later it is more likely to show LINER activity, and still later likely to be a Seyfert.
  • We have selected an all--sky sample of 893 galaxies from the IRAS FSC--2, defined by a total (ADDSCAN) 12um flux limit of 0.22~Jy. Completeness is verified to 0.30~Jy, below which we have quantified the incompleteness down to 0.22~Jy for our statistical analysis. \P The Seyfert subsample is the largest unbiased sample of (118) Seyfert galaxies ever assembled and is complete not only to 0.30~Jy at 12um, but also with respect to a bolometric flux limit of $\sim2.0\times10^{-10}$~(cgs). The average $V/V_{max}$ for the full sample, corrected for incompleteness at low fluxes, is $0.51\pm0.04$, while that for Seyferts is $0.46\pm0.10$, suggesting that several Seyferts are yet to be identified in our sample. The AGN luminosity functions (LFs) are more complete than those of the optically selected CfA Seyfert galaxies for all luminosities and AGN types. \P The 60um LF for a complete 60um--flux--limited (at 8.3~Jy) subsample of 235 galaxies is in satisfactory agreement with those derived from the bright galaxy sample (BGS) and the deep high--galactic latitude sample, both selected at 60um. Over the high lum. range where our sample and the BGS overlap, however, our space densities are systematically lower by a factor of $\sim 1.5$, whereas at low lum. our space densities are higher by about the same amount. Comparable results are obtained when comparing the far--IR LF of our entire sample with the one derived from the BGS. This is not unexpected, because of the bias towards high-luminosity spirals caused by selection at 60um.