• Several authors have reported that the dynamical masses of massive compact galaxies ($M_\star \gtrsim 10^{11} \ \mathrm{M_\odot}$, $r_\mathrm{e} \sim 1 \ \mathrm{kpc}$), computed as $M_\mathrm{dyn} = 5.0 \ \sigma_\mathrm{e}^2 r_\mathrm{e} / G$, are lower than their stellar masses $M_\star$. In a previous study from our group, the discrepancy is interpreted as a breakdown of the assumption of homology that underlie the $M_\mathrm{dyn}$ determinations. Here, we present new spectroscopy of six redshift $z \approx 1.0$ massive compact ellipticals from the Extended Groth Strip, obtained with the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We obtain velocity dispersions in the range $161-340 \ \mathrm{km \ s^{-1}}$. As found by previous studies of massive compact galaxies, our velocity dispersions are lower than the virial expectation, and all of our galaxies show $M_\mathrm{dyn} < M_\star$ (assuming a Salpeter initial mass function). Adding data from the literature, we build a sample covering a range of stellar masses and compactness in a narrow redshift range $\mathit{z \approx 1.0}$. This allows us to exclude systematic effects on the data and evolutionary effects on the galaxy population, which could have affected previous studies. We confirm that mass discrepancy scales with galaxy compactness. We use the stellar mass plane ($M_\star$, $\sigma_\mathrm{e}$, $r_\mathrm{e}$) populated by our sample to constrain a generic evolution mechanism. We find that the simulations of the growth of massive ellipticals due to mergers agree with our constraints and discard the assumption of homology.
  • For many massive compact galaxies, their dynamical masses ($M_\mathrm{dyn} \propto \sigma^2 r_\mathrm{e}$) are lower than their stellar masses ($M_\star$). We analyse the unphysical mass discrepancy $M_\star / M_\mathrm{dyn} > 1$ on a stellar-mass-selected sample of early-type galaxies ($M_\star \gtrsim 10^{11} \ \mathrm{M_\odot}$) at redshifts $z \sim 0.2$ to $z \sim 1.1$. We build stacked spectra for bins of redshift, size and stellar mass, obtain velocity dispersions, and infer dynamical masses using the virial relation $M_\mathrm{dyn} \equiv K \ \sigma_\mathrm{e}^2 r_\mathrm{e} / G$ with $K = 5.0$; this assumes homology between our galaxies and nearby massive ellipticals. Our sample is completed using literature data, including individual objects up to $z \sim 2.5$ and a large local reference sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find that, at all redshifts, the discrepancy between $M_\star$ and $M_\mathrm{dyn}$ grows as galaxies depart from the present-day relation between stellar mass and size: the more compact a galaxy, the larger its $M_\star / M_\mathrm{dyn}$. Current uncertainties in stellar masses cannot account for values of $M_\star / M_\mathrm{dyn}$ above 1. Our results suggest that the homology hypothesis contained in the $M_\mathrm{dyn}$ formula above breaks down for compact galaxies. We provide an approximation to the virial coefficient $K \sim 6.0 \left[ r_\mathrm{e} / (3.185 \ \mathrm{kpc}) \right]^{-0.81} \left[ M_\star / (10^{11} \ \mathrm{M_\odot}) \right]^{0.45}$, which solves the mass discrepancy problem. A rough approximation to the dynamical mass is given by $M_\mathrm{dyn} \sim \left[ \sigma_\mathrm{e} / (200 \ \mathrm{km \ s^{-1}}) \right]^{3.6} \left[ r_\mathrm{e} / (3 \ \mathrm{kpc}) \right]^{0.35} 2.1 \times 10^{11} \ \mathrm{M_\odot}$.
  • Recent observations show that inner discs and rings (IDs and IRs, henceforth) are not preferably found in barred galaxies, a fact that points to the relevance of formation mechanisms different to the traditional bar-origin scenario. In contrast, the role of minor mergers in the formation of these inner components (ICs), while often invoked, is still poorly understood. We have investigated the capability of minor mergers to trigger the formation of IDs and IRs in spiral galaxies through collisionless N-body simulations. We have run a battery of minor mergers in which both primary and secondary are modelled as disc-bulge-halo galaxies with realistic density ratios. A detailed analysis of the morphology, structure, and kinematics of the ICs resulting from the minor merger has been carried out. All the simulated minor mergers develop thin ICs out of satellite material, supported by rotation. A wide morphological zoo of ICs has been obtained (including IDs, IRs, pseudo-rings, nested IDs, spiral patterns, and combinations of them), but all with structural and kinematical properties similar to observations. The existence of the resulting ICs can be deduced through the features that they imprint in the isophotal profiles and kinemetric maps of the final remnant, as in many real galaxies. The realistic density ratios used in the present models make the satellites to experience more efficient orbital circularization and disruption than in previous studies. Combined with the disc resonances induced by the encounter, these processes give place to highly aligned co- and counter-rotating ICs in the remnant centre. Therefore, minor mergers are an efficient mechanism to form rotationally-supported stellar ICs in spiral galaxies, neither requiring strong dissipation nor the development of noticeable bars (abridged).
  • Using deep, high-spatial resolution imaging from the HST ACS Coma Cluster Treasury Survey, we determine colour profiles of early-type galaxies in the Coma cluster. From 176 galaxies brighter than $M_\mathrm{F814W(AB)} = -15$ mag that are either spectroscopically confirmed members of Coma or identified by eye as likely members from their low surface brightness, data are provided for 142 early-type galaxies. Typically, colour profiles are linear against $\log(R)$, sometimes with a nuclear region of distinct, often bluer colour associated with nuclear clusters. Colour gradients are determined for the regions outside the nuclear components. We find that almost all colour gradients are negative, both for elliptical and lenticular galaxies. Most likely, earlier studies that report positive colour gradients in dwarf galaxies are affected by the bluer colours of the nuclear clusters, underlining that high resolution data are essential to disentangle the colour properties of the different morphological components in galaxies. Colour gradients of dwarf galaxies form a continuous sequence with those of elliptical galaxies, becoming shallower toward fainter magnitudes. Interpreting the colours as metallicity tracers, our data suggest that dwarfs as well as giant early-type galaxies in the Coma cluster are less metal rich in their outer parts. We do not find evidence for environmental influence on the gradients, although we note that most of our galaxies are found in the central regions of the cluster. For a subset of galaxies with known morphological types, S0 galaxies have less steep gradients than elliptical galaxies.
  • Nuclear disks and rings are frequent galaxy substructures, for a wide range of morphological types (from S0 to Sc). We have investigated the possible minor-merger origin of inner disks and rings in spiral galaxies through collisionless N-body simulations. The models confirm that minor mergers can drive the formation of thin, kinematically-cold structures in the center of galaxies out of satellite material, without requiring the previous formation of a bar. Satellite core particles tend to be deposited in circular orbits in the central potential, due to the strong circularization experienced by the satellite orbit through dynamical friction. The material of the satellite core reaches the remnant center if satellites are dense or massive, building up a thin inner disk; whereas it is fully disrupted before reaching the center in the case of low-mass satellites, creating an inner ring instead.
  • The HST ACS Coma Cluster Treasury Survey is a deep two passband imaging survey of the nearest very rich cluster of galaxies, covering a range of galaxy density environments. The imaging is complemented by a recent wide field redshift survey of the cluster conducted with Hectospec on the 6.5m MMT. Among the many scientific applications for this data are the search for compact galaxies. In this paper, we present the discovery of seven compact (but quite luminous) stellar systems, ranging from M32-like galaxies down to ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs)/dwarf to globular transition objects (DGTOs). We find that all seven compact galaxies require a two-component fit to their light profile and have measured velocity dispersions that exceed those expected for typical early-type galaxies at their luminosity. From our structural parameter analysis we conclude that three of the sample should be classified as compact ellipticals or M32-like galaxies, the remaining four being less extreme systems. The three compact ellipticals are all found to have old luminosity weighted ages (> 12 Gyr), intermediate metallicities (-0.6 < [Fe/H] < -0.1) and high [Mg/Fe] (> 0.25). Our findings support a tidal stripping scenario as the formation mode of compact galaxies covering the luminosity range studied here. We speculate that at least two early-type morphologies may serve as the progenitor of compact galaxies in clusters.
  • We investigate the causes of the different shape of the $K$-band number counts when compared to other bands, analyzing in detail the presence of a change in the slope around $K\sim17.5$. We present a near-infrared imaging survey, conducted at the 3.5m telescope of the Calar Alto Spanish-German Astronomical Center (CAHA), covering two separated fields centered on the HFDN and the Groth field, with a total combined area of $\sim0.27$deg$^{2}$ to a depth of $K\sim19$ ($3\sigma$,Vega). We derive luminosity functions from the observed $K$-band in the redshift range [0.25-1.25], that are combined with data from the references in multiple bands and redshifts, to build up the $K$-band number count distribution. We find that the overall shape of the number counts can be grouped into three regimes: the classic Euclidean slope regime ($d\log N/dm\sim0.6$) at bright magnitudes; a transition regime at intermediate magnitudes, dominated by $M^{\ast}$ galaxies at the redshift that maximizes the product $\phi^{\ast}\frac{dV_{c}}{d\Omega}$; and an $\alpha$ dominated regime at faint magnitudes, where the slope asymptotically approaches -0.4($\alpha$+1) controlled by post-$M^{\ast}$ galaxies. The slope of the $K$-band number counts presents an averaged decrement of $\sim50%$ in the range $15.5<K<18.5$ ($d\log N/dm\sim0.6-0.30$). The rate of change in the slope is highly sensitive to cosmic variance effects. The decreasing trend is the consequence of a prominent decrease of the characteristic density $\phi^{\ast}_{K,obs}$ ($\sim60%$ from $z=0.5$ to $z=1.5$) and an almost flat evolution of $M^{\ast}_{K,obs}$ (1$\sigma$ compatible with $M^{\ast}_{K,obs}=-22.89\pm0.25$ in the same redshift range).
  • We aim to define a sample of intermediate-z disk galaxies harbouring central bulges, and a complementary sample of disk galaxies without measurable bulges. We intend to provide colour profiles for both samples, as well as measurements of nuclear, disk, and global colours, which may be used to constrain the relative ages of bulges and disks. We select a diameter-limited sample of galaxies in images from the HST/WFPC2 Groth Strip survey, which is divided into two subsamples of higher and lower inclination to assess the role of dust in the measures quantities. Mergers are visually identified and excluded. We take special care to control the pollution by ellipticals. The bulge sample is defined with a criterion based on nuclear surface brightness excess over the inward extrapolation of the exponential law fitted to the outer regions of the galaxies. We extract colour profiles on the semi-minor axis least affected by dust in the disk, and measure nuclear colours at 0.85 kpc from the centre over those profiles. Disk colours are measured on major axis profiles; global colours are obtained from 2.6"-diameter apertures. We obtain a parent sample containing 248 galaxies with known redshifts, spectroscopic or photometric, spanning 0.1 < z < 1.2. The bulge subsample comprises 54 galaxies (21.8% of the total), while the subsample with no measureable bulges is 55.2% of the total (137 galaxies). The remainder (23%) is composed of mergers. We list nuclear, disk, and global colours (observed and restframe) and magnitudes (apparent and absolute), as well as galaxy colour gradients for the samples with and without bulges. We also provide images, colour maps, plots of spectral energy distributions, major-axis surface brightness profiles, and minor-axis colour profiles for both samples.
  • The determination of galaxy merger fraction of field galaxies using automatic morphological indices and photometric redshifts is affected by several biases if observational errors are not properly treated. Here, we correct these biases using maximum likelihood techniques. The method takes into account the observational errors to statistically recover the real shape of the bidimensional distribution of galaxies in redshift - asymmetry space, needed to infer the redshift evolution of galaxy merger fraction. We test the method with synthetic catalogs and show its applicability limits. The accuracy of the method depends on catalog characteristics such as the number of sources or the experimental error sizes. We show that the maximum likelihood method recovers the real distribution of galaxies in redshift and asymmetry space even when binning is such that bin sizes approach the size of the observational errors. We provide a step-by-step guide to applying maximum likelihood techniques to recover any one- or bidimensional distribution subject to observational errors.
  • Dwarf galaxies, as the most numerous type of galaxy, offer the potential to study galaxy formation and evolution in detail in the nearby Universe. Although they seem to be simple systems at first view, they remain poorly understood. In an attempt to alleviate this situation, the MAGPOP EU Research and Training Network embarked on a study of dwarf galaxies named MAGPOP-ITP (Peletier et al., 2007). In this paper, we present the analysis of a sample of 24 dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo Cluster and in the field, using optical long-slit spectroscopy. We examine their stellar populations in combination with their light distribution and environment. We confirm and strengthen previous results that dEs are, on average, younger and more metal-poor than normal elliptical galaxies, and that their [alpha/Fe] abundance ratios scatter around solar. This is in accordance with the downsizing picture of galaxy formation where mass is the main driver for the star formation history. We also find new correlations between the luminosity-weighted mean age, the large-scale asymmetry, and the projected Virgocentric distance. We find that environment plays an important role in the termination of the star formation activity by ram pressure stripping of the gas in short timescales, and in the transformation of disky dwarfs to more spheroidal objects by harassment over longer timescales. This points towards a continuing infall scenario for the evolution of dEs.
  • We have measured the central structural properties for a sample of S0-Sbc galaxies down to scales of ~10 pc using HST NICMOS images. We find that the photometric masses of the central star clusters, which occur in 58% of our sample, are related to their host bulge masses such that MassPt = 10^{7.75\pm0.15}(MassBul/10^{10}MassSun)^{0.76\pm 0.13}. Put together with recent data on bulges hosting supermassive black holes, we infer a non-linear dependency of the `Central Massive Object' mass on the host bulge mass such that MassCMO = 10^{7.51\pm 0.06} (MassBul/10^{10}MassSun)^{0.84 \pm 0.06}. We argue that the linear relation presented by Ferrarese et al. is biased at the low-mass end by the inclusion of the disc light from lenticular galaxies in their sample. Matching our NICMOS data with wider-field, ground-based K-band images enabled us to sample from the nucleus to the disk-dominated region of each galaxy, and thus to perform a proper bulge-disk decomposition. We found that the majority of our galaxies (~90%) possess central light excesses which can be modeled with an inner exponential and/or an unresolved point source in the case of the nuclear star clusters. All the extended nuclear components, with sizes of a few hundred pc, have disky isophotes, which suggest that they may be inner disks, rings, or bars; their colors are redder than those of the underlying bulge, arguing against a recent origin for their stellar populations. Surface brightness profiles rise inward to the resolution limit of the data, with a continuous distribution of logarithmic slopes from the low values typical of dwarf ellipticals (0.1 \leq gamma \leq 0.3) to the high values (gamma ~ 1) typical of intermediate luminosity ellipticals; the nuclear slope bi-modality reported by others is not present in our sample.
  • We investigate bulge and disk scaling relations using a volume-corrected sample of early- to intermediate-type disk galaxies in which, importantly, the biasing flux from additional nuclear components has been modeled and removed. Structural parameters are obtained from a seeing-convolved, bulge+disk+nuclear-component decomposition applied to near-infrared surface brightness profiles spanning ~10 pc to the outer disk. Bulge and disk parameters, and bulge-to-disk ratios, are analyzed as a function of bulge luminosity, disk luminosity, galaxy central velocity dispersion, and galaxy Hubble type. Mathematical expressions are given for the stronger relations, which can be used to test and constrain galaxy formation models. Photometric parameters of both bulges and disks are observed to correlate with bulge luminosity and with central velocity dispersion. In contrast, for the unbarred, early to intermediate types covered by the sample, Hubble type does not correlate with bulge and disk components, nor their various ratios. In this sense, the early-to-intermediate spiral Hubble sequence is scale-free. However, galaxies themselves are not scale-free, the critical scale being the luminosity of the bulge. Bulge luminosity is shown to affect the disk parameters, such that central surface brightness becomes fainter, and scale-length bigger, with bulge luminosity. The lack of significant correlations between bulge pararmeters (size, luminosity or density) on disk luminosity, remains a challenge for secular evolution models of bulge growth.
  • AIM:Learn more about the origin of shells and dust in early type galaxies. METHOD: V-I colours of shells and underlying galaxies are derived, using HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) data. A galaxy model is made locally in wedges and subtracted to determine shell profiles and colours. We applied Voronoi binning to our data to get smoothed colour maps of the galaxies. Comparison with N-body simulations from the literature gives more insight to the origin of the shell features. Shell positions and dust characteristics are inferred from model galaxy subtracted images. RESULT: The ACS images reveal shells well within the effective radius in some galaxies (at 1.7 kpc in the case of NGC 5982). In some cases, strong nuclear dust patches prevent detection of inner shells. Most shells have colours which are similar to the underlying galaxy. Some inner shells are redder than the galaxy. All six shell galaxies show out of dynamical equilibrium dust features, like lanes or patches, in their central regions. Our detection rate for dust in the shell ellipticals is greater than that found from HST archive data for a sample of normal early-type galaxies, at the 95% confidence level. CONCLUSIONS: The merger model describes better the shell distributions and morphologies than the interaction model. Red shell colours are most likely due to the presence of dust and/or older stellar populations. The high prevalence and out of dynamical equilibrium morphologies of the central dust features point towards external influences being responsible for visible dust features in early type shell galaxies. Inner shells are able to manifest themselves in relatively old shell systems.
  • We analyse the skewness of the line-of-sight velocity distributions in model elliptical galaxies built through collisionless galaxy mergers. We build the models using large N-body simulations of mergers between either two spiral or two elliptical galaxies. Our aim is to investigate whether the observed ranges of skewness coefficient (h3) and the rotational support (V/sigma), as well as the anticorrelation between h3 and V, may be reproduced through collisionless mergers. Previous attempts using N-body simulations failed to reach V/sigma ~ 1-2 and corresponding high h3 values, which suggested that gas dynamics and ensuing star formation might be needed in order to explain the skewness properties of ellipticals through mergers. Here we show that high V/sigma and high h3 are reproduced in collisionless spiral-spiral mergers whenever a central bulge allows the discs to retain some of their original angular momentum during the merger. We also show that elliptical-elliptical mergers, unless merging from a high-angular momentum orbit, reproduce the strong skewness observed in non-rotating, giant, boxy ellipticals. The behaviour of the h3 coefficient therefore associates rapidly-rotating disky ellipticals to disc-disc mergers, and associates boxy, slowly-rotating giant ellipticals to elliptical-elliptical mergers, a framework generally consistent with the expectations of hierarchical galaxy formation.
  • Satellite accretion events have been invoked for mimicking the internal secular evolutionary processes of bulge growth. However, N-body simulations of satellite accretions have paid little attention to the evolution of bulge photometric parameters, to the processes driving this evolution, and to the consistency of this evolution with observations. We want to investigate whether satellite accretions indeed drive the growth of bulges, and whether they are consistent with global scaling relations of bulges and discs. We perform N-body models of the accretion of satellites onto disc galaxies. A Tully-Fisher (M \propto V_{rot}^ {alpha_TF}) scaling between primary and satellite ensures that density ratios, critical to the outcome of the accretion, are realistic. We carry out a full structural, kinematic and dynamical analysis of the evolution of the bulge mass, bulge central concentration, and bulge-to-disc scaling relations. The remnants of the accretion have bulge-disc structure. Both the bulge-to-disc ratio (B/D) and the Sersic index (n) of the remnant bulge increase as a result of the accretion, with moderate final bulge Sersic indices: n = 1.0 to 1.9. Bulge growth occurs no matter the fate of the secondary, which fully disrupts for alpha_TF=3 and partially survives to the remnant center for alpha_TF = 3.5 or 4. Global structural parameters evolve following trends similar to observations. We show that the dominant mechanism for bulge growth is the inward flow of material from the disc to the bulge region during the satellite decay. The models confirm that the growth of the bulge out of disc material, a central ingredient of secular evolution models, may be triggered externally through satellite accretion.
  • Shells in Elliptical Galaxies are faint, sharp-edged features, believed to provide evidence of a recent ($\sim 0.5 - 2 \times 10^9$ years ago) merger event. We analyse the Globular Cluster (GC) systems of six shell elliptical galaxies, to examine the effects of mergers upon the GC formation history. We examine the colour distributions, and investigate differences between red and blue globular cluster populations. We present luminosity functions, spatial distributions and specific frequencies ($S_N$) at 50 kpc radius for our sample. We present V and I magnitudes for cluster candidates measured with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Galaxy background light is modelled and removed, and magnitudes are measured in 8 pixel (0.4 arcsec) diameter apertures. Background contamination is removed using counts from HDFS. We find that the colour distributions for NGC 3923 and NGC 5982 have a bimodal form typical of bright ellipticals, with peaks near $V-I=0.92 \pm 0.04$ and $V-I=1.18 \pm 0.06$. In NGC 7626, we find in addition a population of abnormally luminous clusters at $M_I=-12.5$. In NGC 2865 we find an unusually blue population, which may also be young. In NGC1344 and NGC474 the red cluster population is marginally detected. The radial surface density profiles are more flattened than the galaxy light in the cores. As already known, in NGC3923, which has a high $S_N$ of 5.6, the radial density distribution is more shallower than the diffuse galaxy light. The clusters in NGC 2865 and NGC 7626 provide evidence for formation of a population associated with a recent merger. In the other galaxies, the properties of the clusters are similar to those observed in other, non-shell, elliptical galaxies.
  • For bulges of spiral galaxies, the concentration, or Sersic index, increases with bulge luminosity and bulge-to-disk ratio B/D (Andredakis, Peletier, & Balcells 1995, MNRAS, 275, 874). Does this trend trace the growth of bulges via satellite accretion? And, is satellite infall consistent with this trend? Aguerri, Balcells, & Peletier (2001, A&A, 367, 428) investigated this question with N-body simulations of the accretion of dense, spheroidal satellites. Here, we expand on that work by running N-body simulations of the accretion of satellites that have realistic densities. Satellites are modelled as disk-bulge structures with their own dark-matter halo. A realistic density scaling with the primary galaxy is ensured by using the Tully-Fisher relation. Our merger models show that most satellites disrupt before reaching the center. However, a bulge-disk decomposition of the surface density profile after the accretion shows an increase of both the B/D and the Sersic index n of the bulge. The increase in the mass and concentration of the inner Sersic component is due to inward piling up of disk material due to transient bars during the satellite orbital decay. This research is described in Eliche-Moral, Balcells, Aguerri, & Gonzalez-Garcia, 2005 (in preparation).
  • We analyse N-body galaxy merger experiments involving disc galaxies. Mergers of disc-bulge-halo models are compared to those of bulge-less, disc-halo models to quantify the effects of the central bulge on the merger dynamics and on the structure of the remnant. Our models explore galaxy mass ratios 1:1 through 3:1, and use higher bulge mass fraction than previous studies. A full comparison of structural and dynamical properties to observations is carried out. The presence of central bulges results in longer tidal tails, oblate final intrinsic shapes, surface brightness profiles with higher Sersic index, steeper rotation curves, and oblate-rotator internal dynamics. Mergers of bulge-less galaxies do not generate long-lasting tidal tails, and their strong triaxiality seems inconsistent with observations; these remnants show shells, which we do not find in models including central bulges. Giant ellipticals with boxy isophotes and anisotropic dynamics cannot be produced by the mergers modeled here; they could be the result of mergers between lower luminosity ellipticals, themselves plausibly formed in disc-disc mergers.
  • We investigate the luminous X-ray sources in the Lockman Hole (LH) and the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) detected at 24microns using MIPS and also with IRAC on board Spitzer. We assemble optical/infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 45 X-ray/24micron sources in the EGS and LH. Only about 1/4 of the hard X-ray/24micron sources show pure type 1 AGN SEDs. More than half of the X-ray/24micron sources have stellar-emission-dominated or obscured SEDs, similar to those of local type 2 AGN and spiral/starburst galaxies. One-third of the sources detected in hard X-rays do not have a 24micron counterpart. Two such sources in the LH have SEDs resembling those of S0/elliptical galaxies. The broad variety of SEDs in the optical-to-Spitzer bands of X-ray selected AGN means that AGN selected according to the behavior in the optical/infrared will have to be supplemented by other kinds of data (e.g., X-ray) to produce unbiased samples of AGN.
  • We use HST near-infrared imaging to explore the shapes of the surface brightness profiles of bulges of S0-Sbc galaxies at high resolution. Modeling extends to the outer bulge via bulge-disk decompositions of combined HST - ground based profiles. Compact, central unresolved components similar to those reported by others are found in ~84% of the sample. We also detect a moderate frequency (~34%) of nuclear components with exponential profiles which may be disks or bars. Adopting the S\'ersic r^{1/n} functional form for the bulge, none of the bulges have an r^{1/4} behaviour; derived S\'ersic shape-indices are <n> = 1.7 \pm 0.7. For the same sample, fits to NIR ground-based profiles yield S\'ersic indices up to n = 4-6. The high-$n$ of ground-based profiles are a result of nuclear point sources blending with the bulge extended light due to seeing. The low S\'ersic indices are not expected from merger violent relaxation, and argue against significant merger growth for most bulges.
  • We present Halpha rotation curves for a sample of 15 dwarf and LSB galaxies. From these, we derive limits on the slopes of the central mass distributions. Assuming the density distributions of dark matter halos follow a power-law at small radii, rho(r)~r^(-alpha), we find inner slopes in the range 0<alpha<1 for most galaxies. In general, halos with constant density cores (\alpha=0) provide somewhat better fits, but the majority of our galaxies (~75%) are also consistent with alpha=1, provided that the R-band mass-to-light ratios are smaller than about 2. Halos with alpha=1.5, however, are ruled out in virtually every case. To investigate the robustness of these results we discuss and model several possible causes of systematic errors including non-circular motions, slit width, seeing, and slit alignment errors. Taking the associated uncertainties into account, we conclude that even for the 25% of the cases where alpha=1 seems inconsistent with the rotation curves, we cannot rule out cusp slopes this steep. Inclusion of literature samples similar to the one presented here leads to the same conclusion when possible systematic errors are taken into account. In the ongoing debate on whether the rotation curves of dwarf and LSB galaxies are consistent with predictions for a CDM universe, we argue that our sample and the literature samples discussed in this paper provide insufficient evidence to rule out halos with alpha=1. At the same time, we note that none of the galaxies in these samples require halos with steep cusps, as most are equally well or better explained by constant density cores. (abridged)
  • R-band surface photometry is presented for 171 late-type dwarf and irregular galaxies. For a subsample of 46 galaxies B-band photometry is presented as well. We present surface brightness profiles as well as isophotal and photometric parameters including magnitudes, diameters and central surface brightnesses. Absolute photometry is accurate to 0.1 mag or better for 77% of the sample. For over 85% of the galaxies the radial surface brightness profiles are consistent with published data within the measured photometric uncertainty. For most of the galaxies in the sample HI data have been obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The galaxies in our sample are part of the WHISP project (Westerbork HI Survey of Spiral and Irregular Galaxies), which aims at mapping about 500 nearby spiral and irregular galaxies in HI. The availability of HI data makes this data set useful for a wide range of studies of the structure, dark matter content and kinematics of late-type dwarf galaxies.
  • VLA neutral hydrogen observations of the shell elliptical NGC 3656 reveal an edge-on, warped minor axis gaseous disk (M_HI ~ 2.10^9 Msun) extending 7 kpc. HI is also found outside the optical image, on two complexes to the North-East and North-West that seem to trace an outer broken HI disk or ring, or possibly one or two tidal tails. Integral-field optical fiber spectroscopy at the region of the bright southern shell of NGC 3656 has provided a determination of the stellar velocities of the shell. The shell has traces of HI with velocities bracketing the stellar velocities, providing evidence for a dynamical association of HI and stars at the shell. Within the errors the stars have systemic velocity, suggesting a possible phase wrapping origin for the shell. We detect five dwarf galaxies with HI masses ranging from 2.10^8 Msun to 2.10^9 Msun all within 180 kpc from NGC 3656 and all within the velocity range (450 \kms) of the HI of NGC 3656. For the NGC 3656 group to be bound requires a total mass of 3-7.4x10^{12} Msun, yielding a mass to light ratio from 125 to 300. The overall HI picture presented by NGC 3656 supports the hypothesis of a disk-disk merger origin, or possibly an ongoing process of multiple merger with nearby dwarfs.
  • June 22, 2001 astro-ph
    We study the innermost regions of bulges with surface brightness data derived from combined HST/NICMOS and ground-based NIR profiles. Bulge profiles to 1-2 kpc may be fit with Sersic laws, and show a trend with bulge-to-disk ratio: low-B/D bulges are roughly exponential, whereas higher-B/D bulges show increasing Sersic shape index $n$, indicating higher peak central densities and more extended brightness tails. N-body models of accretion of satellites onto disk-bulge-halo galaxies show that satellite accretion contributes to the increase of the shape index $n$ as the bulge grows by accretion. The N-body results demonstrate that exponential profiles are fragile to merging, hence bulges with exponential surface brightness profiles cannot have experienced significant growth by accretion of dense satellites.
  • By combining surface brightness profiles from images taken in the HST/NICMOS F160W and ground-based (GB) $K$ bands, we have obtained NIR profiles for a well studied sample of inclined disk galaxies, spanning radial ranges from 20 pc to a few kpc. We fit PSF-convolved Sersic-plus-exponential laws to the profiles, and compare the results with the fits to the ground-based data alone. HST profiles show light excesses over the best-fit Sersic law in the inner ~1 arcsec. This is often as a result of inner power-law cusps similar to the inner profiles of intermediate-luminosity elliptical galaxies.