• The peculiar emission-line star MWC 137 with its extended optical nebula was recently classified as B[e] supergiant. To study the spatial distribution of its circumstellar molecular gas on small and large scales, we obtained near-infrared and radio observations using SINFONI and APEX, respectively. We find that the hot CO gas is arranged in moving clumpy ring and shell structures close to the star, while a cold CO envelope is encircling the borders of the optical nebula from the south to the west.
  • B[e] Supergiants are a phase in the evolution of some massive stars for which we have observational evidence but no predictions by any stellar evolution model. The mass-loss during this phase creates a complex circumstellar environment with atomic, molecular, and dust regions usually found in rings or disk-like structures. However, the detailed structure and the formation of the circumstellar environment are not well-understood, requiring further investigation. To address that we initiated an observing campaign to obtain a homogeneous set of high-resolution spectra in both the optical and NIR (using MPG-ESO/FEROS, GEMINI/Phoenix and VLT/CRIRES, respectively). We monitor a number of Galactic B[e] Supergiants, for which we examined the [OI] and [CaII] emission lines and the bandheads of the CO and SiO molecules to probe the structure and the kinematics of their formation regions. We find that the emission from each tracer forms either in a single or in multiple equatorial rings.
  • We aim to improve our knowledge on the structure and dynamics of the circumstellar disk of the LMC B[e] supergiant LHA 120-S 73. High-resolution optical and near-IR spectroscopic data were obtained over a period of 16 and 7 years, respectively. The spectra cover the diagnostic emission lines from [CaII] and [OI], as well as the CO bands. These features trace the disk at different distances from the star. We analyzed the kinematics of the individual emission regions by modeling their emission profiles. A low-resolution mid-infrared spectrum was obtained as well, which provides information on the composition of the dusty disk. All diagnostic emission features display double-peaked line profiles, which we interpret as due to Keplerian rotation. We find that LHA 120-S 73 is surrounded by at least four individual rings of material with alternating densities (or by a disk with strongly non-monotonic radial density distribution). Moreover, we find that the molecular ring must have gaps or at least strong density inhomogeneities, or in other words, a clumpy structure. The mid-infrared spectrum displays features of oxygen- and carbon-rich grain species, which indicates a long-lived, stable dusty disk. We cannot confirm the previously reported high value for the stellar rotation velocity. The line profile of HeI 5876 A is strongly variable in both width and shape and resembles of those seen in non-radially pulsating stars. A proper determination of the real underlying stellar rotation velocity is hence not possible. The existence of multiple stable and clumpy rings of alternating density recalls ring structures around planets. Although there is currently insufficient observational evidence, it is tempting to propose a scenario with one (or more) minor bodies or planets revolving around LHA 120-S 73 and stabilizing the ring system, in analogy to the shepherd moons in planetary systems.
  • Magnetospheric observational proxies are used for indirect detection of magnetic fields in hot stars in the X-ray, UV, optical, and radio wavelength ranges. To determine the viability of infrared (IR) hydrogen recombination lines as a magnetic diagnostic for these stars, we have obtained low-resolution (R~1200), near-IR spectra of the known magnetic B2V stars HR 5907 and HR 7355, taken with the Ohio State Infrared Imager/Spectrometer (OSIRIS) attached to the 4.1m Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope. Both stars show definite variable emission features in IR hydrogen lines of the Brackett series, with similar properties as those found in optical spectra, including the derived location of the detected magnetospheric plasma. These features also have the added advantage of a lowered contribution of stellar flux at these wavelengths, making circumstellar material more easily detectable. IR diagnostics will be useful for the future study of magnetic hot stars, to detect and analyze lower-density environments, and to detect magnetic candidates in areas obscured from UV and optical observations, increasing the number of known magnetic stars to determine basic formation properties and investigate the origin of their magnetic fields.
  • The evolutionary phase of B[e] stars is difficult to establish due to the uncertainties in their fundamental parameters. For instance, possible classifications for the Galactic B[e] star MWC 137 include pre-main-sequence and post-main-sequence phases, with a large range in luminosity. Our goal is to clarify the evolutionary stage of this peculiar object, and to study the CO molecular component of its circumstellar medium. To this purpose, we modeled the CO molecular bands using high-resolution K-band spectra. We find that MWC 137 is surrounded by a detached cool (T = 1900 +-100 K) and dense (N = (3 +- 1) x 10^21 cm^(-2)) ring of CO gas orbiting the star with a rotational velocity, projected to the line of sight, of 84 +- 2 km/s. We also find that the molecular gas is enriched in the isotope 13C, excluding the classification of the star as a Herbig Be. The observed isotopic abundance ratio (12C / 13C = 25 +- 2) derived from our modeling is compatible with a proto-PN, main-sequence or supergiant evolutionary phase. However, based on some observable characteristics of MWC 137, we propose that the supergiant scenario seems to be the most plausible. Hence, we suggest that MWC 137 could be in an extremely short-lived phase, evolving from a B[e] supergiant to a blue supergiant with a bipolar ring nebula.
  • HD 50138 is a B[e] star surrounded by a large amount of circumstellar gas and dust. Its spectrum shows characteristics which may indicate either a pre- or a post-main-sequence system. Mapping the kinematics of the gas in the inner few au of the system contributes to a better understanding of its physical nature. We present the first high spatial and spectral resolution interferometric observations of the Br-gamma line of HD~50138, obtained with VLTI/AMBER. The line emission originates from a region more compact (up to 3 au) than the continuum-emitting region. Blue- and red-shifted emission originates from the two different hemispheres of an elongated structure perpendicular to the polarization angle. The velocity of the emitting medium decreases radially. An overall offset along the NW direction between the line- and continuum-emitting regions is observed. We compare the data with a geometric model of a thin Keplerian disk and a spherical halo on top of a Gaussian continuum. Most of the data are well reproduced by this model, except for the variability, the global offset and the visibility at the systemic velocity. The evolutionary state of the system is discussed; most diagnostics are ambiguous and may point either to a post-main-sequence or a pre-main-sequence nature.
  • The aim of this study is to analyse and determine elemental abundances for a large sample of distant B stars in the outer Galactic disk in order to constrain the chemical distribution of the Galactic disk and models of chemical evolution of the Galaxy. Here, we present preliminary results on a few stars along with the adopted methodology based on securing simultaneous O and Si ionization equilibria with consistent NLTE model atmospheres.
  • Massive evolved stars in transition phases, such as Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs), B[e] Supergiants (B[e]SGs), and Yellow Hypergiants (YHGs), are not well understood, and yet crucial steps in determining accurate stellar and galactic evolution models. The circumstellar environments of these stars reveal their mass-loss history, identifying clues to both their individual evolutionary status and the connection between objects of different phases. Here we present a survey of 25 such evolved massive stars (16 B[e]SGs, 6 LBVs, 2 YHGs, and 1 Peculiar Oe star), observed in the K-band with the Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observation in the Near-Infrared (SINFONI; R = 4500) on the ESO VLT UT4 8 m telescope. The sample can be split into two categories based on spectral morphology: one group includes all of the B[e]SGs, the Peculiar Oe star, and two of the LBVs, while the other includes the YHGs and the rest of the LBVs. The difference in LBV spectral appearance is due to some objects being in a quiescent phase and some objects being in an active or outburst phase. CO emission features are found in 13 of our targets, with first time detections for MWC 137, LHA 120-S 35, and LHA 115-S 65. From model fits to the CO band heads, the emitting regions appear to be detached from the stellar surface. Each star with ^12CO features also shows ^13CO emission, signaling an evolved nature. Based on the level of ^13C enrichment, we conclude that many of the B[e]SGs are likely in a pre-Red Supergiant phase of their evolution. There appears to be a lower luminosity limit of log L/L_solar = 5.0 below which CO is not detected. The lack of CO features in several high luminosity B[e]SGs and variability in others suggests that they may in fact be LBV candidates, strengthening the connection between these two very similar transition phases.
  • Young close binaries clear central cavities in their surrounding circumbinary disk from which the stars can still accrete material. This process takes place within the very first astronomical units, and is still not well constrained as the observational evidence has been gathered, until now, only by means of spectroscopy. The young object HD200775 (MWC361) is a massive spectroscopic binary (separation of ~15.9mas, ~5.0~AU), with uncertain classification (early/late Be), that shows a strong and variable Halpha emission. We aim to study the mechanisms that produce the Halpha line at the AU-scale. Combining the radial velocity measurements and astrometric data available in the literature, we determined new orbital parameters. With the VEGA instrument on the CHARA array, we spatially and spectrally resolved the Halpha emission of HD200775, at low and medium spectral resolutions (R~1600 and 5000) over a full orbital period (~3.6 years). We observe that the Halpha equivalent width varies with the orbital phase, and increases close to periastron, as expected from theoretical models that predict an increase of the mass transfer from the circumbinary disk to the primary disk. In addition, using spectral visibilities and differential phases, we find marginal variations of the typical extent of the Halpha emission (at 1 to 2-sigma level) and location (at 1 to 5-sigma level). The spatial extent of the Halpha emission, as probed by a Gaussian FWHM, is minimum at the ascending node (0.67+/-0.20 mas, i.e., 0.22+/-0.06 AU), and more than doubles at periastron. In addition, the Gaussian photocenter is slightly displaced in the direction opposite to the secondary, ruling out the scenario in which all or most of the Halpha emission is due to accretion onto the secondary. These findings, together with the wide Halpha line profile, may be due to a non-spherical wind enhanced at periastron.
  • We are investigating the circumstellar material for a sample of B[e] stars using high spectral resolution data taken in the optical and near-infrared regions with ESO/FEROS and ESO/CRIRES spectrographs, respectively. B[e] stars are surrounded by dense disks of still unknown origin. While optical emission lines from [O I] and [Ca II] reflect the disk conditions close to the star (few stellar radii), the near-infrared data, especially the CO band emission, mirror the characteristics in the molecular part of the disk farther away from the star (several AU). Based on our high resolution spectroscopic data, we seek to derive the density and temperature structure of the disks, as well as their kinematics. This will allow us to obtain a better understanding of their structure, formation history and evolution. Here we present our preliminary results.
  • LHA 115-S 18 is a very peculiar emission-line star exhibiting the B[e] phenomenon. Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, its spectrum shows features of an extremely wide range of excitation and ionization stages, extending from highly ionized atomic lines (Si IV, C IV, He II) in the UV and optical regions to molecular emission bands of CO and TiO in the optical and IR regions. The most distinguishing spectral characteristic of LHA 115-S 18 is the high variability detected in the He II {\lambda}4686 emission line, which can be a very conspicuous or completely invisible feature. In this work, we report on another peculiarity of LHA 115-S 18. From high-resolution optical spectra taken between 2000 and 2008, we discovered the appearance and strengthening of two emission features at {\lambda}6825 \AA, and {\lambda}7082 \AA,, which we identified as Raman-scattered lines. This is the first time these lines have been detected in the spectrum of a massive luminous B[e] star. As the classification of LHA 115-S 18 is highly controversial, we discuss how the discovery of the appearance of Raman-scattered lines in this peculiar star might help us to solve this puzzle.
  • Molecular emission has been detected in several Magellanic Cloud B[e] supergiants. In this Letter, we report on the detection of CO band head emission in the B[e] supergiant LHA 115-S 65, and present a K-band near-infrared spectrum obtained with the Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observation in the Near-Infrared (SINFONI; R=4500) on the ESO VLT UT4 telescope. The observed molecular band head emission in S 65 is quite surprising in light of a previous non-detection by McGregor et al. 1989, as well as a high resolution (R=50000) Gemini/Phoenix spectrum of this star taken nine months earlier showing no emission. Based on analysis of the optical spectrum by Kraus et al. 2010, we suspect that the sudden appearance of molecular emission could be due to density build up in an outflowing viscous disk, as seen for Be stars. This new discovery, combined with variability in two other similar evolved massive stars, indicates an evolutionary link between B[e] supergiants and LBVs.
  • The disc formation mechanism of B[e] supergiants is one of the puzzling phenomena in massive star evolution. Rapid stellar rotation seems to play an important role for the non-spherically symmetric mass-loss leading to a high-density disc or ring-like structure of neutral material around these massive and luminous objects. The radial density and temperature structure as well as the kinematics within this high-density material are, however, not well studied. Based on high-resolution optical spectra of a sample of B[e] supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds we especially searched for tracers of the kinematics within their discs. Besides the well-known [O I] lines, we discovered the [Ca II] {\lambda}{\lambda}7291, 7324 lines that can be used as a complementary set of disc tracers. We find that these lines originate from very high-density regions, located closer to the star than the [O I] {\lambda}5577 line-forming region. The line profiles of both the [O I] and the [Ca II] lines indicate that the discs or rings of high-density material are in Keplerian rotation. We estimate plausible ranges of disc inclination angles for the sample of B[e] supergiants and suggest that the star LHA 120-S 22 might have a spiral arm rather than a disc.
  • BA-type supergiants are amongst the most optically-bright stars. They are observable in extragalactic environments, hence potential accurate distance indicators. Emission activity in the Halpha line of the BA supergiants Rigel (B8Ia) and Deneb (A2Ia) is indicative of presence of localized time-dependent mass ejections. Here, we employ optical interferometry to study the Halpha line-formation region in these stellar environments. High spatial- (0.001 arcsec) and spectral- (R=30 000) resolution observations of Halpha were obtained with the visible recombiner VEGA installed on the CHARA interferometer, using the S1S2 array-baseline (34m). Six independent observations were done on Deneb over the years 2008 and 2009, and two on Rigel in 2009. We analyze this dataset with the 1D non-LTE radiative-transfer code CMFGEN, and assess the impact of the wind on the visible and near-IR interferometric signatures, using both Balmer-line and continuum photons. We observe a visibility decrease in Halpha for both Rigel and Deneb, suggesting that the line-formation region is extended (1.5-1.75 R*). We observe a significant visibility decrease for Deneb in the SiII6371 line. We witness time variations in the differential phase for Deneb, implying an inhomogeneous and unsteady circumstellar environment, while no such variability is seen in differential visibilities. Radiative-transfer modeling of Deneb, with allowance for stellar-wind mass loss, accounts fairly well for the observed decrease in the Halpha visibility. Based on the observed differential visibilities, we estimate that the mass-loss rate of Deneb has changed by less than 5%.
  • We report on the first detection of $^{13}$C enhancement in two B[e] supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Stellar evolution models predict the surface abundance in $^{13}$C to strongly increase during main-sequence and post-main sequence evolution of massive stars. However, direct identification of chemically processed material on the surface of B[e] supergiants is hampered by their dense, disk-forming winds, hiding the stars. Recent theoretical computations predict the detectability of enhanced $^{13}$C via the molecular emission in $^{13}$CO arising in the circumstellar disks of B[e] supergiants. To test this potential method and to unambiguously identify a post-main sequence B[e]SG by its $^{13}$CO emission, we have obtained high-quality $K$-band spectra of two known B[e] supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud, using the Very Large Telescope's Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observation in the Near-Infrared (VLT/SINFONI). Both stars clearly show the $^{13}$CO band emission, whose strength implies a strong enhancement of $^{13}$C, in agreement with theoretical predictions. This first ever direct confirmation of the evolved nature of B[e] supergiants thus paves the way to the first identification of a Galactic B[e] supergiant.
  • B[e] stars are hot stars surrounded by circumstellar gas and dust responsible for the presence of emission lines and IR-excess in their spectra. How dust can be formed in this highly illuminated and diluted environment remains an open issue. HD 62623 is one of the very few A-type supergiants showing the B[e] phenomenon. We obtained nine calibrated visibility measurements using the VLTI/MIDI instrument in SCI-PHOT mode and PRISM spectral dispersion mode with projected baselines ranging from 13 to 71 m and with various position angles. We used geometrical models and physical modeling with a radiative transfer code to analyze these data. The dusty circumstellar environment of HD 62623 is partially resolved by the VLTI/MIDI even with the shortest baselines. The environment is flattened and can be separated into two components: a compact one whose extension grows from 17 mas at 8 microns to 30 mas at 9.6 microns and stays almost constant up to 13 microns, and a more extended one that is over-resolved even with the shortest baselines. Using the radiative transfer code MC3D, we managed to model HD 62623's circumstellar environment as a dusty disk with an inner radius of 3.85+-0.6 AU, an inclination angle of 60+-10 deg, and a mass of 2x10^-7Mo. It is the first time that the dusty disk inner rim of a supergiant star exhibiting the B[e] phenomenon is significantly constrained. The inner gaseous envelope likely contributes up to 20% to the total N band flux and acts like a reprocessing disk. Finally, the hypothesis of a stellar wind deceleration by the companion's gravitational effects remains the most probable case since the bi-stability mechanism does not seem to be efficient for this star.
  • The [O I] line emission of the LMC B[e] supergiant R126 is modeled with an outflowing disk scenario. We find that hydrogen in the disk must be ionized by less than 0.1%, meaning that the disk material is predominantly neutral. The free-free emission is calculated from the polar wind, and the minimum density contrast between disk and polar wind is found to be ~10.