• It is well known that dark matter density measurements, indirect and direct detection experiments, importantly complement the LHC in setting strong constraints on new physics scenarios. Yet, dark matter searches are subject to limitations which need to be considered for realistic analyses. For illustration, we explore the parameter space of the phenomenological MSSM and discuss the interplay of the constraints from dark matter searches and the LHC, and analyse the impact of the astrophysical uncertainties in some detail.
  • We study the implications of dark matter searches, together with collider constraints, on the phenomenological MSSM with neutralino dark matter and focus on the consequences of the related uncertainties in some detail. We consider, inter alia, the latest results from AMS-02, Fermi-LAT and XENON1T. In particular, we examine the impact of the choice of the dark matter halo profile, as well as the propagation model for cosmic rays, for dark matter indirect detection and show that the constraints on the MSSM differ by two orders of magnitude depending on the astrophysical hypotheses. On the other hand, our limited knowledge of the local relic density in the vicinity of the Earth and the velocity of Earth in the dark matter halo leads to a factor 3 in the exclusion limits obtained by direct detection experiments. We identified the astrophysical models leading to the most conservative and the most stringent constraints and for each case studied the complementarities with the latest LHC measurements and limits from Higgs, SUSY and monojet searches. We show that combining all data from dark matter searches and colliders, a large fraction of our supersymmetric sample could be probed. Whereas the direct detection constraints are rather robust under the astrophysical assumptions, the uncertainties related to indirect detection can have an important impact on the number of the excluded points.
  • Two years ago, the AMS collaboration released the most precise measurement of the cosmic ray positron flux. It confirms that pure secondary predictions fall below the data above 10 GeV, suggesting the presence of a primary component, e.g. annihilations of WIMPs dark matter. Most analyses have focused on the high-energy part of the spectrum, disregarding the GeV energy region where cosmic ray transport is harder to model and solar modulation comes into play. Given the high quality of AMS measurements, it is timely to re-examine the positron anomaly over the entire energy range, taking into account transport processes so far neglected, e.g. convection or diffusive re-acceleration. We devise a new semi-analytical method to take into account transport processes so far neglected, but important below a few GeV. It is based on the pinching of inverse Compton and synchrotron energy losses inside the Galactic disc. It allows to carry out extensive scans over the cosmic ray propagation parameters, which we strongly constrain by requiring that the secondary component does not overshoot the AMS measurements. Only models with large diffusion coefficients survive this test. The positron flux is a powerful and independent probe of cosmic ray propagation, complementary to the boron-to-carbon ratio. We then scan over WIMP mass to fit the annihilation cross section and branching ratios, exploring both direct annihilations into standard model particles or through light mediators. In the former case, the best fit yields a $p$-value of 0.4% for a mass of 264 GeV, a value that does not allow to reproduce the highest energy data points. Worse quality fits are found in the latter case. The interpretation of the positron excess in terms of single DM species annihilations is strongly disfavored. This conclusion is based solely on the positron data, and no other observation needs to be invoked.
  • The positron fraction in cosmic rays was found to be a steadily increasing in function of energy, above $\sim$ 10 GeV. This behaviour contradicts standard astrophysical mechanisms, in which positrons are secondary particles, produced in the interactions of primary cosmic rays during the propagation in the interstellar medium. The observed anomaly in the positron fraction triggered a lot of excitement, as it could be interpreted as an indirect signature of the presence of dark matter species in the Galaxy. Alternatively, it could be produced by nearby astrophysical sources, such as pulsars. Both hypotheses are probed in this work in light of the latest AMS-02 positron fraction measurements. The transport of the primary and secondary positrons in the Galaxy is described using a semi-analytic two-zone model. MicrOMEGAs is used to model the positron flux generated by dark matter species. The description of the positron fraction from astrophysical sources is based on the pulsar observations included in the ATNF catalogue. We find that the mass of the favoured dark matter candidates is always larger than 500 GeV. The only dark matter species that fulfils the numerous gamma ray and cosmic microwave background bounds is a particle annihilating into four leptons through a light scalar or vector mediator, with a mixture of tau (75%) and electron (25%) channels, and a mass between 0.5 and 1 TeV. The positron anomaly can also be explained by a single astrophysical source and a list of five pulsars from the ATNF catalogue is given. Those results are obtained with the cosmic ray transport parameters that best fit the B/C ratio. Uncertainties in the propagation parameters turn out to be very significant. In the WIMP annihilation cross section to mass plane for instance, they overshadow the error contours derived from the positron data.