• The optical observations of Ic-4 supernova (SN) 2016coi/ASASSN-16fp, from $\sim 2$ to $\sim450$ days after explosion, are presented along with analysis of its physical properties. The SN shows the broad lines associated with SNe Ic-3/4 but with a key difference. The early spectra display a strong absorption feature at $\sim 5400$ \AA\ which is not seen in other SNe~Ic-3/4 at this epoch. This feature has been attributed to He I in the literature. Spectral modelling of the SN in the early photospheric phase suggests the presence of residual He in a C/O dominated shell. However, the behaviour of the He I lines are unusual when compared with He-rich SNe, showing relatively low velocities and weakening rather than strengthening over time. The SN is found to rise to peak $\sim 16$ d after core-collapse reaching a bolometric luminosity of Lp $\sim 3\times10^{42}$ \ergs. Spectral models, including the nebular epoch, show that the SN ejected $2.5-4$ \msun\ of material, with $\sim 1.5$ \msun\ below 5000 \kms, and with a kinetic energy of $(4.5-7)\times10^{51}$ erg. The explosion synthesised $\sim 0.14$ \msun\ of 56Ni. There are significant uncertainties in E(B-V)host and the distance however, which will affect Lp and MNi. SN 2016coi exploded in a host similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and away from star-forming regions. The properties of the SN and the host-galaxy suggest that the progenitor had $M_\mathrm{ZAMS}$ of $23-28$ \msun\ and was stripped almost entirely down to its C/O core at explosion.
  • Modern data empower observers to describe galaxies as the spatially and biographically complex objects they are. We illustrate this through case studies of four, $z\sim1.3$ systems based on deep, spatially resolved, 17-band + G102 + G141 Hubble Space Telescope grism spectrophotometry. Using full spectrum rest-UV/-optical continuum fitting, we characterize these galaxies' observed $\sim$kpc-scale structures and star formation rates (SFRs) and reconstruct their history over the age of the universe. The sample's diversity---passive to vigorously starforming; stellar masses $\log M_*/M_\odot=10.5$ to $11.2$---enables us to draw spatio-temporal inferences relevant to key areas of parameter space (Milky Way- to super-Andromeda-mass progenitors). Specifically, we find signs that bulge mass-fractions ($B/T$) and SF history shapes/spatial uniformity are linked, such that higher $B/T$s correlate with "inside-out growth" and central specific SFRs that peaked above the global average for all starforming galaxies at that epoch. Conversely, the system with the lowest $B/T$ had a flat, spatially uniform SFH with normal peak activity. Both findings are consistent with models positing a feedback-driven connection between bulge formation and the switch from rising to falling SFRs ("quenching"). While sample size forces this conclusion to remain tentative, this work provides a proof-of-concept for future efforts to refine or refute it: JWST, WFIRST, and the 30-m class telescopes will routinely produce data amenable to this and more sophisticated analyses. These samples---spanning representative mass, redshift, SFR, and environmental regimes---will be ripe for converting into thousands of sub-galactic-scale empirical windows on what individual systems actually looked like in the past, ushering in a new dialog between observation and theory.
  • A massive galaxy cluster can serve as a magnifying glass for distant stellar populations, with strong gravitational lensing exposing details in the lensed background galaxies that would otherwise be undetectable. The MACS J0416.1-2403 cluster (hereafter MACS0416) is one of the most efficient lenses in the sky, and in 2014 it was observed with high-cadence imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Here we describe two unusual transient events that appeared behind MACS0416 in a strongly lensed galaxy at redshift $z = 1.0054 \pm 0.0002$. These transients---designated HFF14Spo-NW and HFF14Spo-SE and collectively nicknamed "Spock"---were faster and fainter than any supernova (SN), but significantly more luminous than a classical nova. They reached peak luminosities of $\sim10^{41}$ erg s$^{-1}$ ($M_{\rm AB} < -14$ mag) in 5 rest-frame days, then faded below detectability in roughly the same time span. Models of the cluster lens suggest that these events may be spatially coincident at the source plane, but are most likely not temporally coincident. We find that HFF14Spo can be explained as a luminous blue variable (LBV), a recurrent nova (RN), or a pair of stellar microlensing events. To distinguish between these hypotheses will require a clarification of the positions of nearby critical curves, along with high-cadence monitoring of the field that could detect new transient episodes in the host galaxy.
  • Gravitational lensing by clusters of galaxies offers a powerful probe of their structure and mass distribution. Deriving a lens magnification map for a galaxy cluster is a classic inversion problem and many methods have been developed over the past two decades to solve it. Several research groups have developed techniques independently to map the predominantly dark matter distribution in cluster lenses. While these methods have all provided remarkably high precision mass maps, particularly with exquisite imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the reconstructions themselves have never been directly compared. In this paper, we report the results of comparing various independent lens modeling techniques employed by individual research groups in the community. Here we present for the first time a detailed and robust comparison of methodologies for fidelity, accuracy and precision. For this collaborative exercise, the lens modeling community was provided simulated cluster images -- of two clusters Ares and Hera -- that mimic the depth and resolution of the ongoing HST Frontier Fields. The results of the submitted reconstructions with the un-blinded true mass profile of these two clusters are presented here. Parametric, free-form and hybrid techniques have been deployed by the participating groups and we detail the strengths and trade-offs in accuracy and systematics that arise for each methodology. We note in conclusion that lensing reconstruction methods produce reliable mass distributions that enable the use of clusters as extremely valuable astrophysical laboratories and cosmological probes.
  • In Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging taken on 10 November 2014, four images of supernova (SN) "Refsdal" (redshift z=1.49) appeared in an Einstein-cross--like configuration (images S1-S4) around an early-type galaxy in the cluster MACS J1149.5+2223 (z=0.54). Almost all lens models of the cluster have predicted that the SN should reappear within a year in a second host-galaxy image created by the cluster's potential. In HST observations taken on 11 December 2015, we find a new source at the predicted position of the new image of SN Refsdal approximately 8" from the previous images S1-S4. This marks the first time the appearance of a SN at a particular time and location in the sky was successfully predicted in advance! We use these data and the light curve from the first four observed images of SN Refsdal to place constraints on the relative time delay and magnification of the new image (SX), compared to images S1-S4. This enables us, for the first time, to test "blind" lens model predictions of both magnifications and time delays for a lensed SN. We find that the timing and brightness of the new image are consistent with the blind predictions of a fraction of the models. The reappearance illustrates the discriminatory power of this blind test and its utility to uncover sources of systematic uncertainty. From planned HST photometry, we expect to reach a precision of 1-2% on the time delay between S1-S4 and SX.
  • We present the first year of Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the unique supernova (SN) 'Refsdal', a gravitationally lensed SN at z=1.488$\pm$0.001 with multiple images behind the galaxy cluster MACS J1149.6+2223. The first four observed images of SN Refsdal (images S1-S4) exhibited a slow rise (over ~150 days) to reach a broad peak brightness around 20 April, 2015. Using a set of light curve templates constructed from SN 1987A-like peculiar Type II SNe, we measure time delays for the four images relative to S1 of 4$\pm$4 (for S2), 2$\pm$5 (S3), and 24$\pm$7 days (S4). The measured magnification ratios relative to S1 are 1.15$\pm$0.05 (S2), 1.01$\pm$0.04 (S3), and 0.34$\pm$0.02 (S4). None of the template light curves fully captures the photometric behavior of SN Refsdal, so we also derive complementary measurements for these parameters using polynomials to represent the intrinsic light curve shape. These more flexible fits deliver fully consistent time delays of 7$\pm$2 (S2), 0.6$\pm$3 (S3), and 27$\pm$8 days (S4). The lensing magnification ratios are similarly consistent, measured as 1.17$\pm$0.02 (S2), 1.00$\pm$0.01 (S3), and 0.38$\pm$0.02 (S4). We compare these measurements against published predictions from lens models, and find that the majority of model predictions are in very good agreement with our measurements. Finally, we discuss avenues for future improvement of time delay measurements -- both for SN Refsdal and for other strongly lensed SNe yet to come.
  • We have acquired Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Very Large Telescope near-infrared spectra and images of supernova (SN) Refsdal after its discovery as an Einstein cross in Fall 2014. The HST light curve of SN Refsdal matches the distinctive, slowly rising light curves of SN 1987A-like supernovae (SNe), and we find strong evidence for a broad H-alpha P-Cygni profile in the HST grism spectrum at the redshift (z = 1.49) of the spiral host galaxy. SNe IIn, powered by circumstellar interaction, could provide a good match to the light curve of SN Refsdal, but the spectrum of a SN IIn would not show broad and strong H-alpha absorption. From the grism spectrum, we measure an H-alpha expansion velocity consistent with those of SN 1987A-like SNe at a similar phase. The luminosity, evolution, and Gaussian profile of the H-alpha emission of the WFC3 and X-shooter spectra, separated by ~2.5 months in the rest frame, provide additional evidence that supports the SN 1987A-like classification. In comparison with other examples of SN 1987A-like SNe, SN Refsdal has a blue B-V color and a high luminosity for the assumed range of potential magnifications. If SN Refsdal can be modeled as a scaled version of SN 1987A, we estimate it would have an ejecta mass of 20+-5 solar masses. The evolution of the light curve at late times will provide additional evidence about the potential existence of any substantial circumstellar material (CSM). Using MOSFIRE and X-shooter spectra, we estimate a subsolar host-galaxy metallicity (8.3+-0.1 dex and <8.4 dex, respectively) near the explosion site.
  • Supernova "Refsdal," multiply imaged by cluster MACSJ1149.5+2223, represents a rare opportunity to make a true blind test of model predictions in extragalactic astronomy, on a time scale that is short compared to a human lifetime. In order to take advantage of this event, we produced seven gravitational lens models with five independent methods, based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Hubble Frontier Field images, along with extensive spectroscopic follow-up observations by HST, the Very Large and the Keck Telescopes. We compare the model predictions and show that they agree reasonably well with the measured time delays and magnification ratios between the known images, even though these quantities were not used as input. This agreement is encouraging, considering that the models only provide statistical uncertainties, and do not include additional sources of uncertainties such as structure along the line of sight, cosmology, and the mass sheet degeneracy. We then present the model predictions for the other appearances of SN "Refsdal." A future image will reach its peak in the first half of 2016, while another image appeared between 1994 and 2004. The past image would have been too faint to be detected in existing archival images. The future image should be approximately one third as bright as the brightest known image (i.e., H_AB~25.7 mag at peak and H_AB~26.7 mag six months before peak), and thus detectable in single-orbit HST images. We will find out soon whether our predictions are correct.
  • [abbreviated] We present a census of Ly\alpha\ emission at $z\gtrsim7$ utilizing deep near infrared HST grism spectroscopy from the first six completed clusters of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). In 24/159 photometrically selected galaxies we detect emission lines consistent with Ly\alpha\ in the GLASS spectra. Based on the distribution of signal-to-noise ratios and on simulations we expect the completeness and the purity of the sample to be 40-100% and 60-90%, respectively. For the objects without detected emission lines we show that the observed (not corrected for lensing magnification) 1$\sigma$ flux limits reaches $5\times10^{-18}$erg/s/cm$^{2}$ per position angle over the full wavelength range of GLASS (0.8-1.7$\mu$m). Based on the conditional probability of Ly\alpha\ emission measured from the ground at $z\sim7$ we would have expected 12-18 Ly\alpha\ emitters. This is consistent with the number of detections, within the uncertainties, confirming the drop in Ly\alpha\ emission with respect to $z\sim6$. These candidates include a promising source at $z=8.1$. The spatial extent of Ly\alpha\ in a deep stack of the most convincing Ly\alpha\ emitters with $\langle z\rangle=7.2$ is consistent with that of the rest-frame UV continuum. Extended Ly$\alpha$ emission, if present, has a surface brightness below our detection limit, consistent with the properties of lower redshift comparison samples. From the stack we estimate upper limits on rest-frame UV emission line ratios and find $f_\textrm{CIV} / f_\textrm{Ly${\alpha}$} \lesssim 0.32$ and $f_\textrm{CIII]} / f_\textrm{Ly$\alpha$} \lesssim 0.23$ in good agreement with other values published in the literature.
  • We give an overview of the Grism Lens Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS), a large Hubble Space Telescope program aimed at obtaining grism spectroscopy of the fields of ten massive clusters of galaxies at redshift z=0.308-0.686, including the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF). The Wide Field Camera 3 yields near infrared spectra of the cluster cores, covering the wavelength range 0.81-1.69mum through grisms G102 and G141, while the Advanced Camera for Surveys in parallel mode provides G800L spectra of the infall regions of the clusters. The WFC3 spectra are taken at two almost orthogonal position angles in order to minimize the effects of confusion. After summarizing the scientific drivers of GLASS, we describe the sample selection as well as the observing strategy and data processing pipeline. We then utilize MACSJ0717.5+3745, a HFF cluster and the first one observed by GLASS, to illustrate the data quality and the high-level data products. Each spectrum brighter than H_AB=23 is visually inspected by at least two co-authors and a redshift is measured when sufficient information is present in the spectra. Furthermore, we conducted a thorough search for emission lines through all the GLASS WFC3 spectra with the aim of measuring redshifts for sources with continuum fainter than H_AB=23. We provide a catalog of 139 emission-line based spectroscopic redshifts for extragalactic sources, including three new redshifts of multiple image systems (one probable, two tentative). In addition to the data itself we also release software tools that are helpful to navigate the data.
  • We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Field (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain 5 high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and 2 tentative ones. We confirm 1 strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all 3 multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometric redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.
  • We present new results from our search for z~7 galaxies from deep spectroscopic observations of candidate z-dropouts in the CANDELS fields. Despite the extremely low flux limits achieved by our sensitive observations, only 2 galaxies have robust redshift identifications, one from its Lyalpha emission line at z=6.65, the other from its Lyman-break, i.e. the continuum discontinuity at the Lyalpha wavelength consistent with a redshift 6.42, but with no emission line. In addition, for 23 galaxies we present deep limits in the Lyalpha EW derived from the non detections in ultra-deep observations. Using this new data as well as previous samples, we assemble a total of 68 candidate z~7 galaxies with deep spectroscopic observations, of which 12 have a line detection. With this much enlarged sample we can place solid constraints on the declining fraction of Ly$\alpha$ emission in z~7 Lyman break galaxies compared to z~6, both for bright and faint galaxies. Applying a simple analytical model, we show that the present data favor a patchy reionization process rather than a smooth one.
  • We present Spitzer/IRAC observations of nine $z'$-band dropouts highly magnified (2<mu<12) by the Bullet Cluster. We combine archival imaging with our Exploratory program (SURFS UP), which results in a total integration time of ~30 hr per IRAC band. We detect (>3sigma) in both IRAC bands the brightest of these high-redshift galaxies, with [3.6]=23.80+-0.28 mag, [4.5]=23.78+-0.25 mag, and (H-[3.6])=1.17+-0.32 mag. The remaining eight galaxies are undetected to [3.6]~26.4 mag and [4.5]~26.0 mag with stellar masses of ~5x10^7 M_sol. The detected galaxy has an estimated magnification of mu=12+-4, which implies this galaxy has an ultraviolet luminosity of L_1500~0.3 L*_{z=7} --- the lowest luminosity individual source detected in IRAC at z>7. By modeling the broadband photometry, we estimate the galaxy has an intrinsic star-formation rate of SFR~1.3 M_sol/yr and stellar mass of M~2x10^9 M_sol, which gives a specific star-formation rate of sSFR~0.7 Gyr^-1. If this galaxy had sustained this star-formation rate since z~20, it could have formed the observed stellar mass (to within a factor of ~2), we also discuss alternate star-formation histories and argue the exponentially-increasing model is unlikely. Finally, based on the intrinsic star-formation rate, we estimate this galaxy has a likely [C II] flux of <f_[C II]> = 10^{-17} erg/s/cm2.
  • The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Large Program, which will obtain 140 orbits of grism spectroscopy of the core and infall regions of 10 galaxy clusters, selected to be among the very best cosmic telescopes. Extensive HST imaging is available from many sources including the CLASH and Frontier Fields programs. We introduce the survey by analyzing spectra of faint multiply-imaged galaxies and $z\gtrsim6$ galaxy candidates obtained from the first seven orbits out of fourteen targeting the core of the Frontier Fields cluster MACS0717.5+3745. Using the G102 and G141 grisms to cover the wavelength range 0.8-1.7$\mu$m, we confirm 4 strongly lensed systems by detecting emission lines in each of the images. For the 9 $z\gtrsim6$ galaxy candidates clear from contamination, we do not detect any emission lines down to a seven-orbit 1$\sigma$ noise level of $\sim$5$\times$10$^{-18}$erg s$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$. Taking lensing magnification into account, our flux sensitivity reaches $\sim$0.2-5$\times$10$^{-18}$erg s$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$. These limits over an uninterrupted wavelength range rule out the possibility that the high-$z$ galaxy candidates are instead strong line emitters at lower redshift. These results show that by means of careful modeling of the background - and with the assistance of lensing magnification - interesting flux limits can be reached for large numbers of objects, avoiding pre-selection and the wavelength restrictions inherent to ground-based multi-slit spectroscopy. These observations confirm the power of slitless HST spectroscopy even in fields as crowded as a cluster core.
  • The gravitational potential of clusters of galaxies acts as a cosmic telescope allowing us to find and study galaxies at fainter limits than otherwise possible and thus probe closer to the epoch of formation of the first galaxies. We use the Bullet Cluster 1E0657-56 (z = 0.296) as a case study, because its high mass and merging configuration makes it one of the most efficient cosmic telescopes we know. We develop a new algorithm to reconstruct the gravitational potential of the Bullet Cluster, based on a non-uniform adaptive grid, combining strong and weak gravitational lensing data derived from deep HST/ACS F606W-F775W-F850LP and ground-based imaging. We exploit this improved mass map to study z~5-6 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs), which we detect as dropouts. One of the LBGs is multiply imaged, providing a geometric confirmation of its high redshift, and is used to further improve our mass model. We quantify the uncertainties in the magnification map reconstruction in the intrinsic source luminosity, and in the volume surveyed, and show that they are negligible compared to sample variance when determining the luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies. With shallower and comparable magnitude limits to HUDF and GOODS, the Bullet cluster observations, after correcting for magnification, probe deeper into the luminosity function of the high redshift galaxies than GOODS and only slightly shallower than HUDF. We conclude that accurately focused cosmic telescopes are the most efficient way to sample the bright end of the luminosity function of high redshift galaxies and - in case they are multiply imaged - confirm their redshifts.
  • In this paper we address the consumption of energy by astronomers while performing their professional duties. Although we find that astronomy uses a negligible fraction of the US energy budget, the rate at which energy is consumed by an average astronomer is similar to that of a typical high-flying businessperson. We review some of the ways in which astronomers are already acting to reduce their energy consumption. In the coming decades, all citizens will have to reduce their energy consumption to conserve fossil fuel reserves and to help avert a potentially catastrophic change in the Earth's climate. The challenges are the same for astronomers as they are for everyone: decreasing the distances we travel and investing in energy-efficient infrastructure. The high profile of astronomy in the media, and the great public interest in our field, can play a role in promoting energy-awareness to the wider population. Our specific recommendations are therefore to 1) reduce travel when possible, through efficient meeting organization, and by investing in high-bandwidth video conference facilities and virtual-world software, 2) create energy-efficient observatories, computing centers and workplaces, powered by sustainable energy resources, and 3) actively publicize these pursuits.
  • The Cold Dark Matter theory of gravitationally-driven hierarchical structure formation has earned its status as a paradigm by explaining the distribution of matter over large spans of cosmic distance and time. However, its central tenet, that most of the matter in the universe is dark and exotic, is still unproven; the dark matter hypothesis is sufficiently audacious as to continue to warrant a diverse battery of tests. While local searches for dark matter particles or their annihilation signals could prove the existence of the substance itself, studies of cosmological dark matter in situ are vital to fully understand its role in structure formation and evolution. We argue that gravitational lensing provides the cleanest and farthest-reaching probe of dark matter in the universe, which can be combined with other observational techniques to answer the most challenging and exciting questions that will drive the subject in the next decade: What is the distribution of mass on sub-galactic scales? How do galaxy disks form and bulges grow in dark matter halos? How accurate are CDM predictions of halo structure? Can we distinguish between a need for a new substance (dark matter) and a need for new physics (departures from General Relativity)? What is the dark matter made of anyway? We propose that the central tool in this program should be a wide-field optical imaging survey, whose true value is realized with support in the form of high-resolution, cadenced optical/infra-red imaging, and massive-throughput optical spectroscopy.
  • High resolution HST/ACS images of the galaxy cluster RX J1347-1145 have enabled us to identify several new multiple image candidates in the cluster, including a 5 image system with a central image. The multiple images allow us to construct an accurate 2-dimensional mass map of the central part of the cluster. The modelling of the cluster mass includes the most prominent cluster galaxies modelled as truncated isothermal spheres and a smooth halo component that is described with 2 parametric profiles. The mass reconstruction is done using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method that provides us with a total projected mass density as well as estimates for the parameters of interest and their respective errors. The mass profile is in reasonable agreement with previous mass estimates based on the X-ray emission from the hot intra-cluster gas, however the X-ray mass estimates are systematically lower than what we obtain with gravitational lensing.
  • We have shown that the cluster-mass reconstruction method which combines strong and weak gravitational lensing data, developed in the first paper in the series, successfully reconstructs the mass distribution of a simulated cluster. In this paper we apply the method to the ground-based high-quality multi-colour data of RX J1347.5-1145, the most X-ray luminous cluster to date. A new analysis of the cluster core on very deep, multi-colour data analysis of VLT/FORS data reveals many more arc candidates than previously known for this cluster. The combined strong and weak lensing reconstruction confirms that the cluster is indeed very massive. If the redshift and identification of the multiple-image system as well as the redshift estimates of the source galaxies used for weak lensing are correct, we determine the enclosed cluster mass in a cylinder to M(<360 h^-1 kpc)= (1.2 +/- 0.3) 10^15 Msun. In addition the reconstructed mass distribution follows the distribution found with independent methods (X-ray measurements, SZ). With higher resolution (e.g. HST imaging data) more reliable multiple imaging information can be obtained and the reconstruction can be improved to accuracies greater than what is currently possible with weak and strong lensing techniques.
  • Weak gravitational lensing is considered to be one of the most powerful tools to study the mass and the mass distribution of galaxy clusters. However, the mass-sheet degeneracy transformation has limited its success. We present a novel method for a cluster mass reconstruction which combines weak and strong lensing information on common scales and can, as a consequence, break the mass-sheet degeneracy. We extend the weak lensing formalism to the inner parts of the cluster and combine it with the constraints from multiple image systems. We demonstrate the feasibility of the method with simulations, finding an excellent agreement between the input and reconstructed mass also on scales within and beyond the Einstein radius. Using a single multiple image system and photometric redshift information of the background sources used for weak and strong lensing analysis, we find that we are effectively able to break the mass-sheet degeneracy, therefore removing one of the main limitations on cluster mass estimates. We conclude that with high resolution (e.g. HST) imaging data the method can more accurately reconstruct cluster masses and their profiles than currently existing lensing techniques.
  • Weak gravitational lensing is considered to be one of the most powerful tools to study the mass and the mass distribution of galaxy clusters. However, weak lensing mass reconstructions are plagued by the so-called mass-sheet degeneracy--the surface mass density \kappa of the cluster can be determined only up to a degeneracy transformation \kappa \to \kappa' = \lambda \kappa + (1 -\lambda), where \lambda is an arbitrary constant. This transformation fundamentally limits the accuracy of cluster mass determinations if no further assumptions are made. We discuss here a possibility to break the mass-sheet degeneracy in weak lensing mass maps using distortion and redshift information of background galaxies. Compared to other techniques proposed in the past, it does not rely on any assumptions on cluster potential and does not make use of weakly constrained information (such as the source number counts, used in the magnification effect).Our simulations show that we are effectively able to break the mass-sheet degeneracy for supercritical lenses and that for undercritical lenses the mass-sheet degeneracy is very difficult to be broken, even under idealised conditions.
  • We present a study of the lens properties of quadruply imaged systems, lensed by numerically simulated galaxies. We investigate a simulated elliptical and disc galaxy drawn from high resolution simulations of galaxy formation in a concordance $\Lambda$CDM universe. The simulations include the effects of gas dynamics, star formation and feedback processes. Flux-ratio anomalies observed in strong gravitational lensing potentially provide an indicator for the presence of mass substructure in lens galaxies as predicted from CDM simulations. We particularly concentrate on the prediction that, for an ideal cusp caustic, the sum of the signed magnifications of the three highly magnified images should vanish when the source approaches the cusp. Strong violation of this cusp relation indicates the presence of substructure, regardless of the global, smooth mass model of the lens galaxy. We draw the following conclusions: (1) the level of substructure present in simulations produces violations of the cusp relation comparable to those observed, (2) higher-order catastrophes (e.g. swallowtails) can also cause changes of the order of 0.6 in the cusp relation as predicted by a smooth model, (3) the flux anomaly distribution depends on the image parity and flux and both the brightest minimum and saddle-point images are more affected by substructure than the fainter images. In addition, the brightest saddle point is demagnified w.r.t. the brightest minimum. Our results are fully numerical and properly include all mass scales, without making semi-analytic assumptions. They are ultimately limited by the mass resolution of single particles in the simulation determined by current computational limits, however show that our results are not affected by shot-noise due to the finite number of particles.
  • Gravitationally lensed systems with multiply imaged quasars are an excellent tool for studying the properties of distant galaxies. In particular, they provide the most accurate mass measures for the lensing galaxy. The system B1422+231 is a well studied example of a quadruply imaged quasar, with high-quality VLBI data available. Very accurate data on image positions, fluxes and deconvolved image sizes provide good constraints for lensing models. We discuss here the failure of smooth models in fitting the data. Since it is intuitively clear that the mass of a lens galaxy is not a smooth entity, we have investigated how deviation from a smooth model can influence lensing phenomena, especially the image flux ratios. To explore expectations about the level of substructure in galaxies and its influence on strong lensing, N-body simulations of a model galaxy are employed. By using the mass distribution of this model galaxy as a lens, synthetic data sets of different four image system configurations are generated. Their analysis can possibly provide evidence for the presence and strong influence of substructure in the primary lens galaxy.
  • In this work we investigate the gravitationally lensed system B1422+231. High--quality VLBI image positions, fluxes and shapes as well as an optical HST lens galaxy position are used. First, two simple and smooth models for the lens galaxy are applied to fit observed image positions and fluxes; no even remotely acceptable model was found. Such models also do not accurately reproduce the image shapes. In order to fit the data successfully, mass substructure has to be added to the lens, and its level is estimated. To explore expectations about the level of substructure in galaxies and its influence on strong lensing, N-body simulation results of a model galaxy are employed. By using the mass distribution of this model galaxy as a lens, synthetic data sets of different four image system configurations are generated and simple lens models are again applied to fit them. The difficulties in fitting these lens systems turn out to be similar to the case of some real gravitationally lensed systems, thus possibly providing evidence for the presence and strong influence of substructure in the primary lens galaxy.