• The operating principle and performances of the Multi-layer Thick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (M-THGEM) is presented. The M-THGEM is a novel hole-type gaseous electron multiplier produced by multi-layer printed circuit board technology; it consists of a densely perforated assembly of multiple insulating substrate sheets (e.g., FR-4), sandwiched between thin metallic-electrode layers. The electron avalanche processes occur along the successive multiplication stages within the M-THGEM holes, under the action of strong dipole fields resulting from the application of suitable potential differences between the electrodes. The present work focuses on investigation of two different geometries: a two-layer M-THGEM (either as single or double-cascade detector) and a single three-layer M-THGEM element, tested in various low-pressure He-based gas mixtures. The intrinsically robust confinement of the avalanche volume within the M-THGEM holes provides an efficient suppression of the photon-induced secondary effects, resulting in a high-gain operation over a broad pressure range, even in pure noble gas. The operational principle, main properties (maximum achievable gain, long-term stability, energy resolution, etc.) under different irradiation conditions, as well as capabilities and potential applications are discussed.
  • We have demonstrated the feasibility of performing high-frame-rate, fast neutron radiography of air-water two-phase flows in a thin channel with rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. A polychromatic, high-intensity fast neutron beam with average energy of 6 MeV was produced by 11.5 MeV deuterons hitting a thick Be target. Image sequences down to 10 millisecond exposure times were obtained using a fast-neutron imaging detector developed in the context of fast-neutron resonance imaging. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and bubble velocities have been measured. The first results are promising, improvements for future experiments are also discussed.
  • Recently, a new detector concept, for combined imaging and spectroscopy of fast-neutrons and gamma was presented. It encompasses a liquid-xenon (LXe) converter-scintillator coupled to a UV-sensitive gaseous Thick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM)-based imaging photomultiplier (GPM). In this work we present and discuss the results of a systematic computer-simulation study aiming at optimizing the type and performance of LXe converter. We have evaluated the detector spectral response, detection efficiency and spatial resolution for gamma-rays and neutrons in the energy range of 2-15 MeV for 50 mm thick converters consisting of plain LXe volume and LXe-filled capillaries, of Teflon, Polyethylene or hydrogen-containing Teflon (Tefzel). Neutron detection efficiencies for plain LXe, Teflon-capillaries and Tefzel-capillaries converters were about 20% over the entire energy range. In polyethylene capillaries converters the neutron detection efficiency was about 10% at 2 MeV and increased up to about 20% at 14 MeV. Detection efficiencies of gammas in Teflon, Tefzel and polyethylene converters were ~35%. The plain-LXe converter provided the highest gamma-ray detection efficiency, of ~40-50% for 2-15 MeV energy range. Optimization of LXe-filled Tefzel capillary dimensions resulted in spatial resolution of ~1.5mm (FWHM) for neutrons and up to 3.5 mm (FWHM) for gamma-rays. Simulations of radiographic images of various materials using two discrete energy gamma-rays (4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV) and neutrons in broad energy range (2-10 MeV) were performed in order to evaluate the potential of elemental discrimination.
  • Novel high efficiency fast-neutron detectors were suggested for fan-beam tomography applications. They combine multi-layer polymer converters in gas medium, coupled to thick gaseous electron multipliers (THGEM). In this work we discuss the results of a systematic study of the electron transport inside a narrow gap between successive converter foils, which affects the performance of the detector, both in terms of detection efficiency and localization properties. The efficiency of transporting ionization electrons was measured along a 0.6 mm wide gas gap in 6 and 10 mm wide polymer converters Computer simulations provided conceptual understanding of the observations. For a drift lengths of 6 mm electrons were efficiently transported along the narrow gas gap, with minimal diffusion-induced losses; an average collection efficiency of 95% was achieved for the ionization electrons induced by a primary electron of a few keV initial energy. The 10 mm height converter yielded considerably lower efficiency due to electrical and mechanical flaws of the converter foils. The results indicate that detection efficiencies of around 7% can be expected for 2.5 MeV neutrons with 300 foils converters, of 6 mm height, 0.4 mm thick foils and 0.6 mm gas gap.
  • The conceptual design and operational principle of a novel high-efficiency, fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM, intended for future fan-beam transmission tomography applications, is described. We report on a feasibility study based on theoretical modeling and computer simulations of a possible detector configuration prototype. In particular we discuss results regarding the optimization of detector geometry, estimation of its general performance, and expected imaging quality: it has been estimated that detection efficiency of around 5-8% can be achieved for 2.5MeV neutrons; spatial resolution is around one millimeter with no substantial degradation due to scattering effects. The foreseen applications of the imaging system are neutron tomography in non-destructive testing for the nuclear energy industry, including examination of spent nuclear fuel bundles, detection of explosives or drugs, as well as investigation of thermal hydraulics phenomena (e.g., two-phase flow, heat transfer, phase change, coolant dynamics, and liquid metal flow).
  • We report on the results of an extensive R&D program aimed at the evaluation of Thick-Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEM) as potential active elements for Digital Hadron Calorimetry (DHCAL). Results are presented on efficiency, pad multiplicity and discharge probability of a 10x10 cm2 prototype detector with 1 cm2 readout pads. The detector is comprised of single- or double-THGEM multipliers coupled to the pad electrode either directly or via a resistive anode. Investigations employing standard discrete electronics and the KPiX readout system have been carried out both under laboratory conditions and with muons and pions at the CERN RD51 test beam. For detectors having a charge-induction gap, it has been shown that even a ~6 mm thick single-THGEM detector reached detection efficiencies above 95%, with pad-hit multiplicity of 1.1-1.2 per event; discharge probabilities were of the order of 1e-6 - 1e-5 sparks/trigger, depending on the detector structure and gain. Preliminary beam tests with a WELL hole-structure, closed by a resistive anode, yielded discharge probabilities of <2e-6 for an efficiency of ~95%. Methods are presented to reduce charge-spread and pad multiplicity with resistive anodes. The new method showed good prospects for further evaluation of very thin THGEM-based detectors as potential active elements for DHCAL, with competitive performances, simplicity and robustness. Further developments are in course.
  • The properties of UV-photon imaging detectors consisting of CsI-coated THGEM electron multipliers are summarized. New results related to detection of Cherenkov light (RICH) and scintillation photons in noble liquid are presented.
  • The operation of single-, double- and triple-THGEM UV-detectors with reflective CsI photocathodes (CsI-THGEM) in Ne/CH4 and Ne/CF4 mixtures was investigated in view of their potential applications in RICH. The studies were carried out with UV, x-rays and {\beta}-electrons and focused on the maximum achievable gain, discharge probability, cathode excitation effects and long-term gain stability. Comparative studies under similar conditions were made in CH4, CF4 and Ne/CF4, with a MWPC coupled to a reflective CsI photocathode (CsI-MWPC). It was found that at counting rates <= 10 Hz/mm^2 the maximum achievable gain of CsI-THGEMs is determined by the Raether limit; at counting rates > 10 Hz/mm^2 it dropped with rate. In all cases investigated the attainable CsI-THGEM gain was significantly higher than that of the CsI-MWPC, under similar conditions. Furthermore, the CsI-THGEM UV-detector suffered fewer cathode-excitation induced effects as compared to CsI-MWPC and had better stability at high counting rates.
  • The article deals with the detection efficiency of UV-photon detectors consisting of Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEM) coated with CsI photocathode, operated in atmospheric Ne/CH4 and Ne/CF4 mixtures. We report on the photoelectron extraction efficiency from the photocathode into these gas mixtures, and on the photoelectron collection efficiency into the THGEM holes. Full collection efficiency was reached in all gases investigated, in some cases at relatively low multiplication. High total detector gains for UV photons, in excess of 10^5, were reached at relatively low operation voltages with a single THGEM element. We discuss the photon detection efficiency in the context of possible application to RICH.
  • The operation of Thick Gaseous Electron Multipliers (THGEM) in Ne and Ne/CH4 mixtures, features high multiplication factors at relatively low operation potentials, in both single- and double-THGEM configurations. We present some systematic data measured with UV-photons and soft x-rays, in various Ne mixtures. It includes gain dependence on hole diameter and gas purity, photoelectron extraction efficiency from CsI photocathodes into the gas, long-term gain stability and pulse rise-time. Position resolution of a 100x100 mm^2 X-rays imaging detector is presented. Possible applications are discussed.
  • We briefly review the concept and properties of the Thick GEM (THGEM); it is a robust, high-gain gaseous electron multiplier, manufactured economically by standard printed-circuit drilling and etching technology. Its operation and structure resemble that of GEMs but with 5 to 20-fold expanded dimensions. The millimeter-scale hole-size results in good electron transport and in large avalanche-multiplication factors, e.g. reaching 10^7 in double-THGEM cascaded single-photoelectron detectors. The multiplier's material, parameters and shape can be application-tailored; it can operate practically in any counting gas, including noble gases, over a pressure range spanning from 1 mbar to several bars; its operation at cryogenic (LAr) conditions was recently demonstrated. The high gain, sub-millimeter spatial resolution, high counting-rate capability, good timing properties and the possibility of industrial production capability of large-area robust detectors, pave ways towards a broad spectrum of potential applications; some are discussed here in brief.
  • We present the results of our recent studies of a Thick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM)-based detector, operated in Ar, Xe and Ar:Xe (95:5) at various gas pressures. Avalanche-multiplication properties and energy resolution were investigated with soft x-rays for different detector configurations and parameters. Gains above 10E4 were reached in a double-THGEM detector, at atmospheric pressure, in all gases, in almost all the tested conditions; in Ar:Xe (95:5) similar gains were reached at pressures up to 2 bar. The energy resolution dependence on the gas, pressure, hole geometry and electric fields was studied in detail, yielding in some configurations values below 20% FWHM with 5.9 keV x-rays.
  • We present the results of our recent studies on a Thick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM)-based imaging detector prototype. It consists of two 100x100 mm^2 THGEM electrodes in cascade, coupled to a resistive anode. The event location is recorded with a 2D double-sided readout electrode equipped with discrete delay-lines and dedicated electronics. The THGEM electrodes, produced by standard printed-circuit board and mechanical drilling techniques, a 0.4 mm thick with 0.5 mm diameter holes spaced by 1 mm. Localization resolutions of about 0.7 mm (FWHM) were measured with soft x-rays, in a detector operated with atmospheric-pressure Ar/CH4; good linearity and homogeneity were achieved. We describe the imaging-detector layout, the resistive-anode 2D readout system and the imaging properties. The THGEM has numerous potential applications that require large-area imaging detectors, with high-rate capability, single-electron sensitivity and moderate (sub-mm) localization resolution.
  • Selective accumulation of B-10 compound in tumour tissue is a fundamental condition for the achievement of BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), since the effectiveness of therapy irradiation derives just from neutron capture reaction of B-10. Hence, the determination of the B-10 concentration ratio, between tumour and healthy tissue, and a control of this ratio, during the therapy, are essential to optimise the effectiveness of the BNCT, which it is known to be based on the selective uptake of B-10 compound. In this work, experimental methods are proposed and evaluated for the determination in vivo of B-10 compound in biological samples, in particular based on neutron radiography and gammaray spectroscopy by telescopic system. Measures and Monte Carlo calculations have been performed to investigate the possibility of executing imaging of the 10B distribution, both by radiography with thermal neutrons, using 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillator screen and a CCD camera, and by spectroscopy, based on the revelation of gamma-ray reaction products from B-10 and the H. A rebuilding algorithm has been implemented. The present study has been done for the standard case of B-10 uptake, as well as for proposed case in which, to the same carrier, is also synthesized Gd-157, in the amount of is used like a contrast agent in NMRI.
  • The Yale-Weizmann collaboration aims to develop a low-radioactivity (low-background) cryogenic noble liquid detector for Dark-Matter (DM) search in measurements to be performed deep underground as for example carried out by the XENON collaboration. A major issue is the background induced by natural radioactivity of present-detector components including the Photo Multiplier Tubes (PMT) made from glass with large U-Th content. We propose to use advanced Thick Gaseous Electron Multipliers (THGEM) recently developed at the Weizmann Institute of Science (WIS). These "hole-multipliers" will measure in a two-phase (liquid/gas) Xe detector electrons extracted into the gas phase from both ionization in the liquid as well as scintillation-induced photoelectrons from a CsI photocathode immersed in LXe. We report on initial tests (in gas) of THGEM made out of Cirlex (Kapton) which is well known to have low Ra-Th content instead of the usual G10 material with high Ra-Th content.
  • The thick GEM (THGEM) [1] is an "expanded" GEM, economically produced in the PCB industry by simple drilling and etching in G-10 or other insulating materials (fig. 1). Similar to GEM, its operation is based on electron gas avalanche multiplication in sub-mm holes, resulting in very high gain and fast signals. Due to its large hole size, the THGEM is particularly efficient in transporting the electrons into and from the holes, leading to efficient single-electron detection and effective cascaded operation. The THGEM provides true pixilated radiation localization, ns signals, high gain and high rate capability. For a comprehensive summary of the THGEM properties, the reader is referred to [2, 3]. In this article we present a summary of our recent study on THGEM-based imaging, carried out with a 10x10 cm^2 double-THGEM detector.
  • Thick GEM-like (THGEM) electrodes are robust, high gain gaseous electron multipliers, economically-manufactured by standard drilling and etching of thin printed circuit board or other materials. Their operation and structure are similar to that of standard GEMs but with 5 to 20-fold expanded dimensions. Due to the larger hole dimensions they provide up to 10^5 and 10^7 charge multiplication, in a single- and in two-electrode cascade, respectively. The signal rise time is of a few ns and the counting-rate capability approaches 10 MHz/mm^2 at 10^4 gains. Sub-mm localization precision was demonstrated with a simple, delay-line based 2D readout scheme. These multipliers may be produced in a variety of shapes and sizes and can operate in many gases. They may replace the standard GEMs in many applications requiring very large area, robust, flat, thin detectors, with good timing and counting-rate properties and modest localization. The properties of these multipliers are presented in short and possible applications are discussed.