• The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011 observing campaign was carried out over the course of 11 weeks in Spring 2011. Here we present the first results from this program, a measurement of the broad-line reverberation lag in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 50. Combining our data with supplemental observations obtained prior to the start of the main observing campaign, our dataset covers a total duration of 4.5 months. During this time, Mrk 50 was highly variable, exhibiting a maximum variability amplitude of a factor of 4 in the U-band continuum and a factor of 2 in the H-beta line. Using standard cross-correlation techniques, we find that H-beta and H-gamma lag the V-band continuum by tau_cen = 10.64(-0.93,+0.82) and 8.43(-1.28,+1.30) days, respectively, while the lag of He II 4686 is unresolved. The H-beta line exhibits a symmetric velocity-resolved reverberation signature with shorter lags in the high-velocity wings than in the line core, consistent with an origin in a broad-line region dominated by orbital motion rather than infall or outflow. Assuming a virial normalization factor of f=5.25, the virial estimate of the black hole mass is (3.2+-0.5)*10^7 solar masses. These observations demonstrate that Mrk 50 is among the most promising nearby active galaxies for detailed investigations of broad-line region structure and dynamics.
  • We have redefined group membership of six southern galaxy groups in the local universe (mean cz < 2000 km/s) based on new redshift measurements from our recently acquired Anglo-Australian Telescope 2dF spectra. For each group, we investigate member galaxy kinematics, substructure, luminosity functions and luminosity-weighted dynamics. Our calculations confirm that the group sizes, virial masses and luminosities cover the range expected for galaxy groups, except that the luminosity of NGC 4038 is boosted by the central starburst merger pair. We find that a combination of kinematical, substructural and dynamical techniques can reliably distinguish loose, unvirialised groups from compact, dynamically relaxed groups. Applying these techniques, we find that Dorado, NGC 4038 and NGC 4697 are unvirialised, whereas NGC 681, NGC 1400 and NGC 5084 are dynamically relaxed.
  • Our VLT (FLAMES) observations near NGC1399 investigate the connection between ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs), NGC1399 globular clusters and intra-cluster globulars. We have uncovered 30 faint compact stellar systems in the Fornax galaxy cluster, adding to 62 bright UCDs previously reported. The magnitude limit of these stellar systems extends down to the globular cluster domain. We detect a filament of UCDs and globular clusters stretching across NGC1399 and find weak evidence for its rotation. These compact stellar systems not only congregate around several cluster galaxies but are also widely distributed through intra-cluster space.
  • Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) are a new type of galaxy we have discovered in the central region of the Fornax and Virgo clusters. Unresolved in ground-based imaging, UCDs have spectra typical of old stellar systems. Ninety-two have been found in Fornax, making them the most numerous galaxy type in the cluster. Here we present multicolour (u'g'r'i'z') imaging of the central region of the Fornax Cluster using the CTIO 4m Mosaic Telescope. The colour-magnitude relation for bright UCDs is qualitatively consistent with UCDs being the stripped nuclei of dE,Ns. However at faint magnitudes, GCs and UCDs cannot be distinguished by colour alone. High resolution spectroscopy to measure their internal velocity dispersions and metallicities, is needed to distinguish between GCs and UCDs.
  • We have discovered nine ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) in the Virgo Cluster, extending samples of these objects outside the Fornax Cluster. Using the 2dF multi-fiber spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, the new Virgo members were found among 1500 color-selected, star-like targets with 16.0 < b_j < 20.2 in a two-degree diameter field centered on M87 (NGC4486). The newly-found UCDs are comparable to the UCDs in the Fornax Cluster, with sizes <~ 100 pc, -12.9 < M_B < -10.7, and exhibiting red, absorption-line spectra, indicative of an older stellar population. The properties of these objects remain consistent with the tidal threshing model for the origin of UCDs from the surviving nuclei of nucleated dwarf ellipticals disrupted in the cluster core, but can also be explained as objects that were formed by mergers of star clusters created in galaxy interactions. The discovery that UCDs exist in Virgo shows that this galaxy type is probably a ubiquitous phenomenon in clusters of galaxies; coupled with their possible origin by tidal threshing, the UCD population is a potential indicator and probe of the formation history of a given cluster. We also describe one additional bright UCD with M_B = -12.0 in the core of the Fornax Cluster. We find no further UCDs in our Fornax Cluster Spectroscopic Survey down to b_j = 19.5 in two additional 2dF fields extending as far as 3 degrees from the center of the cluster. All six Fornax bright UCDs identified with 2dF lie within 0.5 degree (projected distance of 170 kpc) of the central elliptical galaxy NGC1399.
  • Dwarf galaxies have attracted increased attention in recent years, because of their susceptibility to galaxy transformation processes within rich galaxy clusters. Direct evidence for these processes, however, has been difficult to obtain, with a small number of diffuse light trails and intra-cluster stars being the only signs of galaxy disruption. Furthermore, our current knowledge of dwarf galaxy populations may be very incomplete, because traditional galaxy surveys are insensitive to extremely diffuse or compact galaxies. Aware of these concerns, we recently undertook an all-object survey of the Fornax galaxy cluster. This revealed a new population of compact members, overlooked in previous conventional surveys. Here we demonstrate that these 'ultra-compact' dwarf galaxies are structurally and dynamically distinct from both globular star clusters and known types of dwarf galaxy, and thus represent a new class of dwarf galaxy. Our data are consistent with the interpretation that these are the remnant nuclei of disrupted dwarf galaxies, making them an easily observed tracer of galaxy disruption.
  • We study the recently discovered gravitational lens SDSS J1004+4112, the first quasar lensed by a cluster of galaxies. It consists of four images with a maximum separation of 14.62''. The system has been confirmed as a lensed quasar at z=1.734 on the basis of deep imaging and spectroscopic follow-up observations. We present color-magnitude relations for galaxies near the lens plus spectroscopy of three central cluster members, which unambiguously confirm that a cluster at z=0.68 is responsible for the large image separation. We find a wide range of lens models consistent with the data, but they suggest four general conclusions: (1) the brightest cluster galaxy and the center of the cluster potential well appear to be offset by several kpc; (2) the cluster mass distribution must be elongated in the North--South direction, which is consistent with the observed distribution of cluster galaxies; (3) the inference of a large tidal shear (~0.2) suggests significant substructure in the cluster; and (4) enormous uncertainty in the predicted time delays between the images means that measuring the delays would greatly improve constraints on the models. We also compute the probability of such large separation lensing in the SDSS quasar sample, on the basis of the CDM model. The lack of large separation lenses in previous surveys and the discovery of one in SDSS together imply a mass fluctuation normalization \sigma_8=1.0^{+0.4}_{-0.2} (95% CL), if cluster dark matter halos have an inner slope -1.5. Shallower profiles would require higher values of \sigma_8. Although the statistical conclusion might be somewhat dependent on the degree of the complexity of the lens potential, the discovery is consistent with the predictions of the abundance of cluster-scale halos in the CDM scenario. (Abridged)
  • Gravitational lensing is a powerful tool for the study of the distribution of dark matter in the Universe. The cold-dark-matter model of the formation of large-scale structures predicts the existence of quasars gravitationally lensed by concentrations of dark matter so massive that the quasar images would be split by over 7 arcsec. Numerous searches for large-separation lensed quasars have, however, been unsuccessful. All of the roughly 70 lensed quasars known, including the first lensed quasar discovered, have smaller separations that can be explained in terms of galaxy-scale concentrations of baryonic matter. Although gravitationally lensed galaxies with large separations are known, quasars are more useful cosmological probes because of the simplicity of the resulting lens systems. Here we report the discovery of a lensed quasar, SDSS J1004+4112, which has a maximum separation between the components of 14.62 arcsec. Such a large separation means that the lensing object must be dominated by dark matter. Our results are fully consistent with theoretical expectations based on the cold-dark-matter model.
  • We present BVI photometry of 190 galaxies in the central region of the Fornax Cluster observed with the Michigan Curtis Schmidt Telescope. The cluster members exhibit a strong surface brightness-magnitude relation in our data: both giant and dwarf ellipticals decrease in surface brightness as luminosity decreases. However the surface brightness-magnitude relation is no longer a reliable method for determining cluster membership at surface brightnesses fainter than 22 mag/sq.arcsec. The newly discovered ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) lie well off the normal surface brightness-magnitude relation. We present the colour-magnitude relation for a sample of 113 cluster galaxies as a function of morphological type. The UCDs also lie off the locus of this relation. Their mean V-I colours are redder than dwarf galaxies of similar luminosity, but similar to those of globular clusters associated with NGC 1399. The location of the UCDs on both surface brightness and colour-magnitude plots supports the hypothesis that they are the remnants of tidally stripped nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxies.
  • The Fornax Cluster Spectroscopic Survey (FCSS) project utilises the 2dF multi-object spectrograph on the AAT. Its aim is to obtain spectra for a complete sample of all 14000 objects with 16.5<bj<19.7 irrespective of their morphology in a 12 sq deg area centred on the Fornax Cluster. A sample of 24 Fornax Cluster members has been identified from the first 2dF field (3.1 sq deg in area) to be completed. This is the first complete smaple of cluster objects of known distance with well defined selection limits. 19 of the galaxies (with -15.8<M_B<-12.7) appear to be conventional dwarf elliptical or dwarf S0 galaxies. The other 5 objects (with -13.6<M_B<-11.3) are those galaxies which we described in Drinkwater et al (2002b) and labelled `Ultra-Compact Dwarfs' (UCDs). A major result is that the conventional dwarfs all have scale-sizes>3 arcsec (abut 300 pc). This apparent minimum scale size implies an equivalent minimum luminosity for a dwarf of a given surface brightness. This produces a limit on their distribution in the magnitude-surface brightness plane, such that we do not observe dEs with high surface brightnesses but faint absolute magnitudes. Above this observed minimum scale-size of 3 arcsec, the dEs and dS0s fill the whole area of the magnitude-surface brightness plane sampled by our selection limits. The observed correlation between magnitude and surface brightness noted by several recent studies of brighter galaxies is not seen with our fainter cluster sample. A comparison of our results with the Fornax Cluster Catalog (FCC) of Ferguson illustrates that attempts to determine cluster membership solely on the basis of observed morphology can produce significant errors.
  • By utilising the large multi-plexing advantage of the 2dF spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, we have been able to obtain a complete spectroscopic sample of all objects in a predefined magnitude range, 16.5<Bj<19.7, regardless of morphology, in an area towards the centre of the Fornax Cluster of galaxies. Among the unresolved or marginally resolved targets we have found five objects which are actually at the redshift of the Fornax Cluster, i.e. they are extremely compact dwarf galaxies or extremely large star clusters. All five have absorption line spectra. With intrinsic sizes less than 1.1 arc second HWHM (corresponding to approximately 100 pc at the distance of the cluster), they are more compact and significantly less luminous than other known compact dwarf galaxies, yet much brighter than any globular cluster. In this letter we present new ground based optical observations of these enigmatic objects. In addition to having extremely high central surface brightnesses, these objects show no evidence of any surrounding low surface brightness envelopes down to much fainter limits than is the case for, e.g., nucleated dwarf ellipticals. Thus, if they are not merely the stripped remains of some other type of galaxy, then they appear to have properties unlike any previously known type of stellar system.
  • We have used the 2dF spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain a complete spectroscopic sample of all objects in the magnitude range, Bj= 16.5 to 19.8, regardless of morphology, in an area centred on the Fornax Cluster of galaxies. Among the unresolved targets are five objects which are members of the Fornax Cluster. They are extremely compact stellar systems with scale lengths less than 40 parsecs. These ultra-compact dwarfs are unlike any known type of stellar system, being more compact and significantly less luminous than other compact dwarf galaxies, yet much brighter than any globular cluster.
  • We present observations of SDSSp J104433.04--012502.2, a luminous quasar at z=5.80 discovered from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multicolor imaging data. This object was selected as an i'-band dropout object, with i*=21.8 +/- 0.2, z*=19.2 +/- 0.1. It has an absolute magnitude M1450 = -27.2 (H_0 =50 km/s/Mpc, q0 = 0.5). The spectrum shows a strong and broad Ly alpha emission line, strong Ly alpha forest absorption lines with a mean continuum decrement D_A = 0.91, and a Lyman Limit System at z=5.72. The spectrum also shows strong OI and SiIV emission lines similar to those of quasars at z<= 5, suggesting that these metals were produced at redshift beyond six. The lack of a Gunn-Peterson trough in the spectrum indicates that the universe is already highly ionized at z ~ 5.8. Using a high-resolution spectrum in the Ly alpha forest region, we place a conservative upper limit of the optical depth due to the Gunn-Peterson effect of tau < 0.5 in regions of minimum absorption. The Ly alpha forest absorption in this object is much stronger than that in quasars at z<= 5. The object is unresolved in a deep image with excellent seeing, implying that it is unlensed. The black hole mass of this quasar is ~3 x 10^9 M_solar if we assume that it is radiating at the Eddington luminosity and no lensing amplification, implying that it resides in a very massive dark matter halo. The discovery of one quasar at M_1450 < -27 in a survey area of 600 deg^2 is consistent with an extrapolation of the observed luminosity function at lower redshift. The abundance and evolution of such quasars can provide sensitive tests of models of quasar and galaxy formation.
  • We describe a population of compact objects in the centre of the Fornax Cluster which were discovered as part of our 2dF Fornax Spectroscopic Survey. These objects have spectra typical of old stellar systems, but are unresolved on photographic sky survey plates. They have absolute magnitudes -13<Mb<-11, so they are 10 times more luminous than any Galactic globular clusters, but fainter than any known compact dwarf galaxies. These objects are all within 30 arcminutes of the central galaxy of the cluster, NGC 1399, but are distributed over larger radii than the globular cluster system of that galaxy. We suggest that these objects are either super-massive star clusters (intra-cluster globular clusters or tidally stripped nuclei of dwarf galaxies) or a new type of low-luminosity compact elliptical dwarf (M32-type) galaxy. The best way to test these hypotheses will be to obtain high resolution imaging and high-dispersion spectroscopy to determine their structures and mass-to-light ratios. This will allow us to compare them to known compact objects and establish if they represent a new class of hitherto unknown stellar system.
  • We have used the VLA FIRST survey and the APM catalog of the POSS-I plates as the basis for constructing a new radio-selected sample of optically bright quasars. This is the first radio-selected sample that is competitive in size with current optically selected quasar surveys. Using only two basic criteria, radio-optical positional coincidence and optical morphology, quasars and BL Lacs can be identified with 60% selection efficiency; the efficiency increases to 70% for objects fainter than magnitude 17. We show that a more sophisticated selection scheme can predict with better than 85% reliability which candidates will turn out to be quasars. This paper presents the second installment of the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey with a catalog of 636 quasars distributed over 2682 square degrees. The quasar sample is characterized and all spectra are displayed. The FBQS detects both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars out to a redshift z>3. We find a large population of objects of intermediate radio-loudness; there is no evidence in our sample for a bimodal distribution of radio characteristics. The sample includes ~29 broad absorption line quasars, both high and low ionization, and a number of new objects with remarkable optical spectra.
  • Bent-double radio sources can act as tracers for clusters of galaxies. We present imaging and spectroscopic observations of the environments surrounding ten of these sources (most of them Wide Angle Tails (WATs)) selected from the VLA FIRST survey. Our results reveal a previously unknown cluster associated with eight of the radio sources with redshifts in the range 0.33 < z < 0.85; furthermore, we cannot rule out that the other two bent doubles may be associated with clusters at higher redshift. Richness measurements indicate that these clusters are typical of the majority of those found in the Abell (1958) catalog, with a range of Abell richness classes from 0 to 2. The line-of-sight velocity dispersions are very different from cluster to cluster, ranging from approximately 300 to 1100 km/s. At the upper end of these intervals, we may be sampling some of the highest-redshift massive clusters known. Alternatively, the large velocity dispersions measured in some of the clusters may indicate that they are merging systems with significant substructure, consistent with recent ideas concerning WAT formation (Burns et al. 1994).
  • The FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters) survey now covers 1550 square degrees of sky where $07^{h}16 < \alpha < 17^{h}40$ and $28^{\circ}.3 < \delta < 42^{\circ}$. This yields a catalog of 138,665 sources above the survey threshold of 1 mJy, about one third of which are in double-lobed and multi-component sources. We have used these data to obtain the first high-significance measurement of the two-point angular correlation for a deep radio sample. We find that the correlation function between $0.02^{\circ}$ and $2^{\circ}$ is well fitted by a power law of the form $A\theta^{\gamma}$ where $A\approx 3\times 10^{-3}$ and $\gamma\approx -1.1$. On small scales ($\theta<0.2^{\circ}$), double and multi-component sources are shown to have a larger clustering amplitude than that of the whole sample. Sources with flux densities below 2 mJy are found to have a shallower slope than that obtained for the whole sample, consistent with there being a significant contribution from starbursting galaxies at these faint fluxes. The cross-correlation of radio sources and Abell clusters is determined. A preliminary approach to inferring spatial information is outlined.