• We present the first scattered-light images of two debris disks around the F8 star HD 104860 and the F0V star HD 192758, respectively $\sim45$ and $\sim67$ pc away. We detected these systems in the F110W and F160W filters through our re-analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS data with modern starlight subtraction techniques. Our image of HD 104860 confirms the morphology previously observed by Herschel in thermal emission with a well-defined ring at radius $\sim114$ au inclined $\sim58$ degrees. Although the outer edge profile is consistent with dynamical evolution models, the sharp inner edge suggests sculpting by unseen perturbers. Our images of HD 192758 reveal a disk at radius $\sim95$ au inclined by $\sim59$ degrees, never resolved so far. These disks have low scattering albedos of 10% and 13% respectively, inconsistent with water ice grain compositions. They are reminiscent of several other disks with similar inclination and scattering albedos: Fomalhaut, HD 92945, HD 202628, and HD 207129. They are also very distinct from brighter disks in the same inclination bin, which point to different compositions between these two populations. Varying scattering albedo values can be explained by different grain porosities, chemical compositions, or grain size distributions, which may indicate distinct formation mechanisms or dynamical processes at work in these systems. Finally, these faint disks with large infrared excesses may be representative of an underlying population of systems with low albedo values. Searches with more sensitive instruments on HST or on the James Webb Space Telescope and using state-of-the art starlight-subtraction methods may help discover more of such faint systems.
  • We present the first scattered-light images of the debris disk around 49 ceti, a ~40 Myr A1 main sequence star at 59 pc, famous for hosting two massive dust belts as well as large quantities of atomic and molecular gas. The outer disk is revealed in reprocessed archival Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS F110W images, as well as new coronagraphic H band images from the Very Large Telescope SPHERE instrument. The disk extends from 1.1" (65 AU) to 4.6" (250 AU), and is seen at an inclination of 73degr, which refines previous measurements at lower angular resolution. We also report no companion detection larger than 3 M_Jup at projected separations beyond 20 AU from the star (0.34"). Comparison between the F110W and H-band images is consistent with a grey color of 49 ceti's dust, indicating grains larger than >2microns. Our photometric measurements indicate a scattering efficiency / infrared excess ratio of 0.2-0.4, relatively low compared to other characterized debris disks. We find that 49 ceti presents morphological and scattering properties very similar to the gas-rich HD 131835 system. From our constraint on the disk inclination we find that the atomic gas previously detected in absorption must extend to the inner disk, and that the latter must be depleted of CO gas. Building on previous studies, we propose a schematic view of the system describing the dust and gas structure around 49 ceti and hypothetic scenarios for the gas nature and origin.
  • Some circumstellar disks, called transitional or hybrid disks, present characteristics of both protoplanetary disks (significant amount of gas) and debris disks (evolved structures around young main-sequence stars, composed of second generation dust, from collisions between planetesimals). Therefore, they are an ideal astrophysical laboratory to witness the last stages of planet formation. The circumstellar disk around HD~141569A was intensively observed and resolved in the past from space but also from the ground but the recent implementation of high contrast imaging systems opens new opportunities to re-analyze this object. We analyzed Gemini archival data from the Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) obtained in 2011 in the H band, using several angular differential imaging techniques (classical ADI, LOCI, KLIP). These images reveal the complex structures of this disk with an unprecedented resolution. We also include archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images as an independent dataset to confirm these findings. Using an analysis of the inner edge of the disk, we show that the inner disk is almost axisymmetrical. The measurement of an offset towards the East observed by previous authors is likely due to the fact that the Eastern part of this disk is wider and more complex in substructure. Our precise re-analysis of the eastern side shows several structures including a splitting of the disk and a small finger detached from the inner edge on the southeast. Finally, we find that the arc at 250 AU is unlikely to be a spiral, at least not at the inclination derived from the first ring, but instead could be interpreted as a third belt at a different inclination. If the very symmetrical inner disk edge is carved by a companion, the data presented here put additional constraints on its position.
  • Directly detecting thermal emission from young extrasolar planets allows measurement of their atmospheric composition and luminosity, which is influenced by their formation mechanism. Using the Gemini Planet Imager, we discovered a planet orbiting the \$sim$20 Myr-old star 51 Eridani at a projected separation of 13 astronomical units. Near-infrared observations show a spectrum with strong methane and water vapor absorption. Modeling of the spectra and photometry yields a luminosity of L/LS=1.6-4.0 x 10-6 and an effective temperature of 600-750 K. For this age and luminosity, "hot-start" formation models indicate a mass twice that of Jupiter. This planet also has a sufficiently low luminosity to be consistent with the "cold- start" core accretion process that may have formed Jupiter.
  • The ALICE program, for Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environment, is currently conducting a virtual survey of about 400 stars, by re-analyzing the HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive with advanced post-processing techniques. We present here the strategy that we adopted to identify detections and potential candidates for follow-up observations, and we give a preliminary overview of our detections. We present a statistical analysis conducted to evaluate the confidence level on these detection and the completeness of our candidate search.
  • The imaging channel on the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) is equipped with four coronagraphs that provide high contrast imaging capabilities for studying faint point sources and extended emission that would otherwise be overwhelmed by a bright point-source in its vicinity. Such bright sources might include stars that are orbited by exoplanets and circumstellar material, mass-loss envelopes around post-main-sequence stars, the near-nuclear environments in active galaxies, and the host galaxies of distant quasars. This paper describes the coronagraphic observing modes of MIRI, as well as performance estimates based on measurements of the MIRI flight model during cryo-vacuum testing. A brief outline of coronagraphic operations is also provided. Finally, simulated MIRI coronagraphic observations of a few astronomical targets are presented for illustration.
  • PDS 144 is a pair of Herbig Ae stars that are separated by 5.35" on the sky. It has previously been shown to have an A2Ve Herbig Ae star viewed at 83\circ inclination as its northern member and an A5Ve Herbig Ae star as its southern member. Direct imagery revealed a disk occulting PDS 144 N - the first edge-on disk observed around a Herbig Ae star. The lack of an obvious disk in direct imagery suggested PDS 144 S might be viewed face-on or not physically associated with PDS 144 N. Multi-epoch Hubble Space Telescope imagery of PDS 144 with a 5 year baseline demonstrates PDS 144 N & S are comoving and have a common proper motion with TYC 6782-878-1. TYC 6782-878-1 has previously been identified as a member of Upper Sco sub-association A at d = 145 \pm 2 pc with an age of 5-10 Myr. Ground-based imagery reveals jets and a string of Herbig-Haro knots extending 13' (possibly further) which are aligned to within 7\circ \pm 6\circ on the sky. By combining proper motion data and the absence of a dark mid-plane with radial velocity data, we measure the inclination of PDS 144 S to be i = 73\circ \pm 7\circ. The radial velocity of the jets from PDS 144 N & S indicates they, and therefore their disks, are misaligned by 25\circ \pm 9\circ. This degree of misalignment is similar to that seen in T Tauri wide binaries.
  • We are undertaking a multi-frequency Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) survey of edge-on protoplanetary disks to probe the growth of solids in each disk, sedimentation of such material into the disk midplane, and the connection of these phenomena to the planet formation process. The projection of edge-on disk systems along our line of sight enables a study of the vertical stratification of large grains with fewer model dependencies than would be required for disks that are more face-on. Robust studies of the spatial distribution of grains up to ~1 cm in size are possible with the wavelength range and sensitivity of the EVLA. In this contribution we describe target selection and observational strategies. First results concerning the Class 0 source IRAS04368+2557 (L1527 IRS) are presented, including a study of this source's 8.46 GHz continuum variability over short and long time baselines and an indication that its protoplanetary disk may have a dearth of pebble-sized grains.