• Red supergiants have been confirmed as the progenitor stars of the majority of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. However, while such stars are observed with masses >25M$_\odot$, detections of >18M$_\odot$ progenitors remain elusive. Red supergiants are also expected to form at all metallicities, but discoveries of explosions from low-metallicity progenitors are scarce. Here, we report observations of the type II supernova, SN 2015bs, for which we infer a progenitor metallicity of $\leq$0.1Z$_\odot$ from comparison to photospheric-phase spectral models, and a Zero Age Main-Sequence mass of 17-25M$_\odot$ through comparison to nebular-phase spectral models. SN 2015bs displays a normal 'plateau' light-curve morphology, and typical spectral properties, implying a red supergiant progenitor. This is the first example of such a high mass progenitor for a 'normal' type II supernova, suggesting a link between high mass red supergiant explosions and low-metallicity progenitors.
  • Radiative transfer models of two transitional type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) have been produced using the abundance stratification technique. These two objects --designated SN 2007on and SN 2011iv-- both exploded in the same galaxy, NGC 1404, which allows for a direct comparison. SN 2007on synthesised 0.25 $M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni and was less luminous than SN 2011iv, which produced 0.31 $M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni. SN 2007on had a lower central density ($\rho_{c}$) and higher explosion energy ($E_{\rm kin}$ $\sim 1.3\pm$0.3$\times10^{51}$erg) than SN 2011iv, and it produced less nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) elements (0.06 $M_{\odot}$). Whereas, SN 2011iv had a larger $\rho_{c}$, which increased the electron capture rate in the lowest velocity regions, and produced 0.35 $M_{\odot}$ of stable NSE elements. SN 2011iv had an explosion energy of $E_{\rm kin}$ $\sim 0.9 \pm$0.2$\times10^{51}$erg. Both objects had an ejecta mass consistent with the Chandrasekhar mass (Ch-mass), and their observational properties are well described by predictions from delayed-detonation explosion models. Within this framework, comparison to the sub-luminous SN 1986G indicates SN 2011iv and SN 1986G have different transition densities ($\rho_{tr}$) but similar $\rho_{c}$. Whereas, SN 1986G and SN 2007on had a similar $\rho_{tr}$ but different $\rho_{c}$. Finally, we examine the colour-stretch parameter $s_{BV}$ vs. $L_{max}$ relation and determine that the bulk of SNe Ia (including the sub-luminous ones) are consistent with Ch-mass delayed-detonation explosions, where the main parameter driving the diversity is $\rho_{tr}$. We also find $\rho_{c}$ to be driving the second order scatter observed at the faint end of the luminosity-width relationship.
  • The nebular-epoch spectrum of the rapidly declining, "transitional" type Ia supernova (SN) 2007on showed double emission peaks, which have been interpreted as indicating that the SN was the result of the direct collision of two white dwarfs. The spectrum can be reproduced using two distinct emission components, one red-shifted and one blue shifted. These components are similar in mass but have slightly different degrees of ionization. They recede from one another at a line-of-sight speed larger than the sum of the combined expansion velocities of their emitting cores, thereby acting as two independent nebulae. While this configuration appears to be consistent with the scenario of two white dwarfs colliding, it may also indicate an off-centre delayed detonation explosion of a near Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf. In either case, broad emission line widths and a rapidly evolving light curve can be expected for the bolometric luminosity of the SN. This is the case for both SNe 2007on and 2011iv, also a transitional SN Ia which exploded in the same elliptical galaxy, NGC 1404. Although SN 2011iv does not show double-peaked emission line profiles, the width of its emission lines is such that a two-component model yields somewhat better results than a single-component model. Most of the mass ejected is in one component, however, which suggests that SN 2011iv was the result of the off-centre ignition of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf.
  • We present a study of observed Type II supernova (SN~II) colours using optical/near-infrared photometric data from the \textit{Carnegie Supernovae Project-I}. We analyse four colours ($B-V$, $u-g$, $g-r$, and $g-Y$) and find that SN~II colour curves can be described by two linear regimes during the photospheric phase. The first ($s_{\rm 1,colour}$) is steeper and has a median duration of $\sim 40$ days. The second, shallower slope ($s_{\rm 2,colour}$) lasts until the end of the "plateau" ($\sim 80$ days). The two slopes correlate in the sense that steeper initial colour curves also imply steeper colour curves at later phases. As suggested by recent studies, SNe~II form a continuous population of objects from the colour point of view as well. We investigate correlations between the observed colours and a range of photometric and spectroscopic parameters including the absolute magnitude, the $V$-band light-curve slopes, and metal-line strengths. We find that less luminous SNe~II appear redder, a trend that we argue is not driven by uncorrected host-galaxy reddening. While there is significant dispersion, we find evidence that redder SNe~II (mainly at early epochs) display stronger metal-line equivalent widths. Host-galaxy reddening does not appear to be a dominant parameter, neither driving observed trends nor dominating the dispersion in observed colours. Intrinsic SN~II colours are most probably dominated by photospheric temperature differences, with progenitor metallicity possibly playing a minor role. Such temperature differences could be related to differences in progenitor radius, together with the presence or absence of circumstellar material close to the progenitor stars.
  • Hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) have been predominantly found in low-metallicity, star-forming dwarf galaxies. Here we identify Gaia17biu/SN 2017egm as an SLSN-I occurring in a "normal" spiral galaxy (NGC 3191) in terms of stellar mass (several times 10^10 M_sun) and metallicity (roughly Solar). At redshift z=0.031, Gaia17biu is also the lowest redshift SLSN-I to date, and the absence of a larger population of SLSNe-I in dwarf galaxies of similar redshift suggests that metallicity is likely less important to the production of SLSNe-I than previously believed. With the smallest distance and highest apparent brightness for an SLSN-I, we are able to study Gaia17biu in unprecedented detail. Its pre-peak near-ultraviolet to optical color is similar to that of Gaia16apd and among the bluest observed for an SLSN-I while its peak luminosity (M_g = -21 mag) is substantially lower than Gaia16apd. Thanks to the high signal-to-noise ratios of our spectra, we identify several new spectroscopic features that may help to probe the properties of these enigmatic explosions. We detect polarization at the ~0.5% level that is not strongly dependent on wavelength, suggesting a modest, global departure from spherical symmetry. In addition, we put the tightest upper limit yet on the radio luminosity of an SLSN-I with <5.4x10^26 erg/s/Hz (at 10 GHz), which is almost a factor of 40 better than previous upper limits and one of the few measured at an early stage in the evolution of an SLSN-I. This limit largely rules out an association of this SLSNe-I with known populations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) like central engines.
  • We present our analysis of the Type II supernova DLT16am (SN~2016ija). The object was discovered during the ongoing $\rm{D}<40\,\rm{Mpc}$ (DLT40) one day cadence supernova search at $r\sim20.1\,\rm{mag}$ in the `edge-on' nearby ($D=20.0\pm1.9\,\rm{Mpc}$) galaxy NGC~1532. The subsequent prompt and high-cadenced spectroscopic and photometric follow-up revealed a highly extincted transient, with $E(B-V)=1.95\pm0.15\,\rm{mag}$, consistent with a standard extinction law with $R_V=3.1$ and a bright ($M_V=-18.49\pm0.65\,\rm{mag}$) absolute peak-magnitude. The comparison of the photometric features with those of large samples of Type II supernovae reveals a fast rise for the derived luminosity and a relatively short plateau phase, with a slope of $S_{50V}=0.84\pm0.04\,\rm{mag}/50\,\rm{d}$ consistent with the photometric properties typical of those of fast declining Type II supernovae. Despite the large uncertainties on the distance and the extinction in the direction of DLT16am, the measured photospheric expansion velocity and the derived absolute $V$-band magnitude at $\sim50\,\rm{d}$ after the explosion match the existing luminosity-velocity relation for Type II supernovae.
  • We present photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the highly luminous Type Ibn supernova ASASSN-14ms, which was discovered on UT 2014-12-26.61 at $m_V \sim 16.5$. With a peak absolute $V$-band magnitude brighter than $-20.5$, a peak bolometric luminosity of $1.7 \times 10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$, and a total radiated energy of $2.1 \times 10^{50}$ ergs, ASASSN-14ms is one of the most luminous Type Ibn supernovae yet discovered. In simple models, the most likely power source for this event is a combination of the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni and $^{56}$Co at late times and the interaction of supernova ejecta with the progenitor's circumstellar medium at early times, although we cannot rule out the possibility of a magnetar-powered light curve. The presence of a dense circumstellar medium is indicated by the intermediate-width He I features in the spectra. The faint ($m_g \sim 21.6$) host galaxy SDSS J130408.52+521846.4 has an oxygen abundance below $12+\log(O/H) \lesssim 8.3$, a stellar mass of $M_* \sim 2.6 \times 10^8 M_{\odot}$, and a star formation rate of $\textrm{SFR} \sim 0.02$ $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$.
  • We present an analysis of ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared observations of the fast-declining Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) 2007on and 2011iv, hosted by the Fornax cluster member NGC 1404. The B-band light curves of SN 2007on and SN 2011iv are characterised by dm_15(B) decline-rate values of 1.96 mag and 1.77 mag, respectively. Although they have similar decline rates, their peak B- and H-band magnitudes differ by ~0.60 mag and ~0.35 mag, respectively. After correcting for the luminosity vs. decline rate and the luminosity vs. colour relations, the peak B-band and H-band light curves provide distances that differ by ~14% and ~9%, respectively. These findings serve as a cautionary tale for the use of transitional SNe Ia located in early-type hosts in the quest to measure cosmological parameters. Interestingly, even though SN 2011iv is brighter and bluer at early times, by three weeks past maximum and extending over several months, its B-V colour is 0.12 mag redder than that of SN 2007on. To reconcile this unusual behaviour, we turn to guidance from a suite of spherical one-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation explosion models. In this context, 56Ni production depends on both the so-called transition density and the central density of the progenitor white dwarf. To first order, the transition density drives the luminosity-width relation, while the central density is an important second-order parameter. Within this context, the differences in the B-V color evolution along the Lira regime suggests the progenitor of SN~2011iv had a higher central density than SN~2007on.
  • We study optical light curve(LC) relations of type Ia supernovae(SNe~Ia) for their use in cosmology using high-quality photometry published by the Carnegie-Supernovae-Project (CSP-I). We revisit the classical luminosity-decline-rate ($\Delta m_{15}$) relation and the Lira-relation, as well as investigate the time evolution of the ($B-V$) color and $B(B-V)$, which serves as the basis of the color-stretch relation and Color-MAGnitude-Intercept-Calibrations(CMAGIC). Our analysis is based on explosion and radiation transport simulations for spherically-symmetric delayed-detonation models(DDT) producing normal-bright and subluminous SNe~Ia. Empirical LC-relations can be understood as having the same physical underpinnings: i.e. the opacities, ionization balances in the photosphere, and radioactive energy deposition changing with time from below to above the photosphere. Some 3-4 weeks past maximum, the photosphere recedes to ${}^{56}$Ni-rich layers of similar density structure, leading to a similar color evolution. An important secondary parameter is the central density $\rho_c$ of the WD because at higher densities more electron capture elements are produced at the expense of ${}^{56}$Ni production. This results in a $\Delta m_{15}$ spread of 0.1 mag for normal-bright and 0.7 mag in sub-luminous SNe~Ia and $\approx0.2$ mag in the Lira-relation. We show why color-magnitude diagrams emphasize the transition between physical regimes, and allow to construct templates depend mostly on $\Delta m_{15}$ with little dispersion in both the CSP-I sample and our DDT-models. This allows to separate intrinsic SN~Ia variations from the interstellar reddening characterized by $E(B-V)$ and $R_{B}$. Mixing of different explosion scenarios causes a wide spread in empirical relations which may suggest one dominant scenario.
  • The first phase of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) was a dedicated supernova follow-up program based at the Las Campanas Observatory that collected science data of young, low-redshift supernovae between 2004 and 2009. Presented in this paper is the CSP-I photometric data release of low-redshift stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae. The data consist of optical (uBgVri) photometry of 34 objects, with a subset of 26 having near-infrared (YJH) photometry. Twenty objects have optical pre-maximum coverage with a subset of 12 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of B-band maximum brightness. In the near-infrared, 17 objects have pre-maximum observations with a subset of 14 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of J-band maximum brightness. Analysis of this photometric data release is presented in companion papers focusing on techniques to estimate host-galaxy extinction (Stritzinger et al., submitted) and the light-curve and progenitor star properties of the sample (Taddia et al., submitted). The analysis of an accompanying visual-wavelength spectroscopy sample of ~150 spectra will be the subject of a future paper.
  • Stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe) include H-poor (Type IIb), H-free (Type Ib) and He-free (Type Ic) events thought to be associated with the deaths of massive stars. The exact nature of their progenitors is a matter of debate. Here we present the analysis of the light curves of 34 SE SNe published by the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I), which are unparalleled in terms of photometric accuracy and wavelength range. Light-curve parameters are estimated through the fits of an analytical function and trends are searched for among the resulting fit parameters. We found a tentative correlation between the peak absolute $B$-band magnitude and $\Delta m_{15}(B)$, as well as a correlation between the late-time linear slope and $\Delta m_{15}$. Making use of the full set of optical and near-IR photometry, combined with robust host-galaxy extinction corrections, bolometric light curves are constructed and compared to both analytic and hydrodynamical models. From the hydrodynamical models we obtained ejecta masses of $1.1-6.2$ $M_{\odot}$, $^{56}$Ni masses of $0.03-0.35$ $M_{\odot}$, and explosion energies (excluding two SNe Ic-BL) of $0.25-3.0\times10^{51}$ erg. Our analysis indicates that adopting $\kappa = 0.07$ cm$^{2}$ g$^{-1}$ as the mean opacity serves to be a suitable assumption when comparing Arnett-model results to those obtained from hydrodynamical calculations. We also find that adopting He I and O I line velocities to infer the expansion velocity in He-rich and He-poor SNe, respectively, provides ejecta masses relatively similar to those obtained by using the Fe II line velocities. The inferred ejecta masses are compatible with intermediate mass ($M_{ZAMS} \leq 20$ $M_{\odot}$) progenitor stars in binary systems for the majority of SE SNe. Furthermore, the majority of our SNe is affected by significant mixing of $^{56}$Ni, particularly in the case of SNe Ic.
  • We aim to improve upon contemporary methods to estimate host-galaxy reddening of stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe). To this end the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) SE SNe photometry data release, consisting of nearly three dozen objects, is used to identify a minimally reddened sub-sample for each traditionally defined spectroscopic sub-types (i.e, SNe~IIb, SNe~Ib, SNe~Ic). Inspection of the optical and near-infrared (NIR) colors and color evolution of the minimally reddened sub-samples reveals a high degree of homogeneity, particularly between 0d to +20d relative to B-band maximum. This motivated the construction of intrinsic color-curve templates, which when compared to the colors of reddened SE SNe, yields an entire suite of optical and NIR color excess measurements. Comparison of optical/optical vs. optical/NIR color excess measurements indicates the majority of the CSP-I SE SNe suffer relatively low amounts of reddening and we find evidence for different R_(V)^(host) values among different SE SN. Fitting the color excess measurements of the seven most reddened objects with the Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model provides robust estimates of the host visual-extinction A_(V)^(host) and R_(V)^(host). In the case of the SE SNe with relatively low amounts of reddening, a preferred value of R_(V)^(host) is adopted for each sub-type, resulting in estimates of A_(V)^(host) through Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model fits to the observed color excess measurements. Our analysis suggests SE SNe reside in galaxies characterized by a range of dust properties. We also find evidence SNe Ic are more likely to occur in regions characterized by larger R_(V)^(host) values compared to SNe IIb/Ib and they also tend to suffer more extinction. These findings are consistent with work in the literature suggesting SNe Ic tend to occur in regions of on-going star formation.
  • SN 2002cx-like Type Ia supernovae (also known as SNe Iax) represent one of the most numerous peculiar SN classes. They differ from normal SNe Ia by having fainter peak magnitudes, faster decline rates and lower photospheric velocities, displaying a wide diversity in these properties. We present both integral-field and long-slit visual-wavelength spectroscopy of the host galaxies and explosion sites of SNe Iax to provide constraints on their progenitor formation scenarios. The SN Iax explosion site metallicity distribution is similar to that of core-collapse (CC) SNe and metal-poor compared to normal SNe Ia. Fainter members, speculated to form distinctly from brighter SN Iax, are found at a range of metallicities, extending to very metal-poor environments. Although the SN Iax explosion sites' ages and star-formation rates are comparatively older and less intense than the distribution of star forming regions across their host galaxies, we confirm the presence of young stellar populations (SP) at explosion environments for most SNe Iax, expanded here to a larger sample. Ages of the young SP (several $\times 10^{7}$ to $10^8$~yrs) are consistent with predictions for young thermonuclear and electron-capture SN progenitors. The lack of extremely young SP at the explosion sites disfavours very massive progenitors such as Wolf-Rayet explosions with significant fall-back. We find weak ionised gas in the only SN Iax host without obvious signs of star-formation. The source of the ionisation remains ambiguous but appears unlikely to be mainly due to young, massive stars.
  • Supernova (SN) 2016bdu is an unusual transient resembling SN 2009ip. SN 2009ip-like events are characterized by a long-lasting phase of erratic variability which ends with two luminous outbursts a few weeks apart. The second outburst is significantly more luminous (about 3 mag) than the first. In the case of SN 2016bdu, the first outburst (Event A) reached an absolute magnitude M(r) ~ -15.3 mag, while the second one (Event B) occurred over one month later and reached M(r) ~ -18 mag. By inspecting archival data, a faint source at the position of SN 2016bdu is detectable several times in the past few years. We interpret these detections as signatures of a phase of erratic variability, similar to that experienced by SN 2009ip between 2008 and mid-2012, and resembling the currently observed variability of the luminous blue variable SN 2000ch in NGC 3432. Spectroscopic monitoring of SN 2016bdu during the second peak initially shows features typical of a SN IIn. One month after the Event B maximum, the spectra develop broad Balmer lines with P Cygni profiles and broad metal features. At these late phases, the spectra resemble those of a typical Type II SN. All members of this SN 2009ip-like group are remarkably similar to the Type IIn SN 2005gl. For this object, the claim of a terminal SN explosion is supported by the disappearance of the progenitor star. The similarity with SN 2005gl suggests that all members of this family may finally explode as genuine SNe, although the unequivocal detection of nucleosynthesised elements in their nebular spectra is still missing.
  • We present ultraviolet, optical and infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of the type Ic superluminous supernova (SLSN) Gaia16apd (= SN 2016eay), covering its evolution from 26 d before the $g$-band peak to 234.1 d after the peak. Gaia16apd was followed as a part of the NOT Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS). It is one of the closest SLSNe known ($z = 0.102\pm0.001$), with detailed optical and ultraviolet (UV) observations covering the peak. Gaia16apd is a spectroscopically typical type Ic SLSN, exhibiting the characteristic blue early spectra with O II absorption, and reaches a peak $M_{g} = -21.8 \pm 0.1$ mag. However, photometrically it exhibits an evolution intermediate between the fast- and slowly-declining type Ic SLSNe, with an early evolution closer to the fast-declining events. Together with LSQ12dlf, another SLSN with similar properties, it demonstrates a possible continuum between fast- and slowly-declining events. It is unusually UV-bright even for a SLSN, reaching a non-$K$-corrected $M_{uvm2} \simeq -23.3$ mag, the only other type Ic SLSN with similar UV brightness being SN 2010gx. Assuming that Gaia16apd was powered by magnetar spin-down, we derive a period of $P = 1.9\pm0.2$ ms and a magnetic field of $B = 1.9\pm0.2 \times 10^{14}$ G for the magnetar. The estimated ejecta mass is between 8 and 16 $\mathrm{M}_{\odot}$ and the kinetic energy between 1.3 and $2.5 \times 10^{52}$ erg, depending on opacity and assuming that the entire ejecta is swept up into a thin shell. Despite the early photometric differences, the spectra at late times are similar to slowly-declining type Ic SLSNe, implying that the two subclasses originate from similar progenitors.
  • This catalog summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright ($m_{peak}\leq17$), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered in 2016. We then gather the near-IR through UV magnitudes of all host galaxies and the offsets of the supernovae from the centers of their hosts from public databases. We illustrate the results using a sample that now totals 668 supernovae discovered since 2014 May 1, including the supernovae from our previous catalogs, with type distributions closely matching those of the ideal magnitude limited sample from Li et al. (2011). This is the third of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.
  • The coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will restrict spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence new methods based solely on photometric data must be developed. Here, we construct a complete Hubble diagram of Type II supernovae combining data from three different samples: the Carnegie Supernova Project-I, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II SN, and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Applying the Photometric Colour Method (PCM) to 73 Type II supernovae (SNe~II) with a redshift range of 0.01--0.5 and with no spectral information, we derive an intrinsic dispersion of 0.35 mag. A comparison with the Standard Candle Method (SCM) using 61 SNe~II is also performed and an intrinsic dispersion in the Hubble diagram of 0.27 mag is derived, i.e., 13\% in distance uncertainties. Due to the lack of good statistics at higher redshifts for both methods, only weak constraints on the cosmological parameters are obtained. However, assuming a flat Universe and using the PCM, we derive a Universe's matter density: $\Omega_{m}$=0.32$^{+0.30}_{-0.21}$ providing a new independent evidence for dark energy at the level of two sigma.
  • High-quality collections of Type II supernova (SN) light curves are scarce because they evolve for hundreds of days, making follow-up observations time consuming and often extending over multiple observing seasons. In light of these difficulties, the diversity of SNe II is not fully understood. Here we present ultraviolet and optical photometry of 12 SNe II monitored by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) during 2013-2014, and compare them with previously studied SNe having well-sampled light curves. We explore SN II diversity by searching for correlations between the slope of the linear light-curve decay after maximum light (historically used to divide SNe II into IIL and IIP) and other measured physical properties. While SNe IIL are found to be on average more luminous than SNe IIP, SNe IIL do not appear to synthesize more 56Ni than SNe IIP. Finally, optical nebular spectra obtained for several SNe in our sample are found to be consistent with models of red supergiant progenitors in the 12-16 Msun range. Consequently, SNe IIL appear not to account for the deficit of massive red supergiants as SN II progenitors.
  • Ultraviolet (UV) observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) probe the outermost layers of the explosion, and UV spectra of SNe Ia are expected to be extremely sensitive to differences in progenitor composition and the details of the explosion. Here we present the first study of a sample of high signal-to-noise ratio SN Ia spectra that extend blueward of 2900 A. We focus on spectra taken within 5 days of maximum brightness. Our sample of ten SNe Ia spans the majority of the parameter space of SN Ia optical diversity. We find that SNe Ia have significantly more diversity in the UV than in the optical, with the spectral variance continuing to increase with decreasing wavelengths until at least 1800 A (the limit of our data). The majority of the UV variance correlates with optical light-curve shape, while there are no obvious and unique correlations between spectral shape and either ejecta velocity or host-galaxy morphology. Using light-curve shape as the primary variable, we create a UV spectral model for SNe Ia at peak brightness. With the model, we can examine how individual SNe vary relative to expectations based on only their light-curve shape. Doing this, we confirm an excess of flux for SN 2011fe at short wavelengths, consistent with its progenitor having a subsolar metallicity. While most other SNe Ia do not show large deviations from the model, ASASSN-14lp has a deficit of flux at short wavelengths, suggesting that its progenitor was relatively metal rich.
  • We present near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic and photometric observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. The seventeen NIR spectra span epochs from +15.3 to +92.5 days after $B$-band maximum light, while the $JHK_s$ photometry include epochs from $-$10 to +71 days. This data is used to constrain the progenitor system of SN 2014J utilizing the Pa$\beta$ line, following recent suggestions that this phase period and the NIR in particular are excellent for constraining the amount of swept up hydrogen-rich material associated with a non-degenerate companion star. We find no evidence for Pa$\beta$ emission lines in our post-maximum spectra, with a rough hydrogen mass limit of $\lesssim$0.1 $M_{\odot}$, which is consistent with previous limits in SN 2014J from late-time optical spectra of the H$\alpha$ line. Nonetheless, the growing dataset of high-quality NIR spectra holds the promise of very useful hydrogen constraints.
  • Spectral modelling of SNII atmospheres indicates a clear dependence of metal line strengths on progenitor metallicity. This motivates further work to evaluate the accuracy with which these SNe can be used as metallicity indicators. To assess this accuracy we present a sample of SNII HII-region spectroscopy, from which environment abundances are derived. These environment abundances are compared to the observed strength of metal lines in SN spectra. Combining our sample with measurements from the literature, we present oxygen abundances of 119 host HII regions, by extracting emission line fluxes and using abundance diagnostics. Then, following Dessart et al., these abundances are compared to equivalent widths of Fe 5018 A at various time and colour epochs. Our distribution of inferred SNII host HII-region abundances has a range of ~0.6 dex. We confirm the dearth of SNeII exploding at metallicities lower than those found (on average) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The equivalent width of Fe 5018 A at 50 days post explosion shows a statistically significant correlation with host HII-region oxygen abundance. The strength of this correlation increases if one excludes abundance measurements derived far from SN explosion sites. The correlation significance also increases if we only analyse a 'gold' IIP sample, and if a colour epoch is used in place of time. In addition, no evidence is found of correlation between progenitor metallicity and SN light-curve or spectral properties - except for that stated above with respect to Fe 5018 A equivalent width - suggesting progenitor metallicity is not a driving factor in producing the diversity observed in our sample. This study provides observational evidence of the usefulness of SNII as metallicity indicators. We finish with a discussion of the methodology needed to use SN spectra as independent metallicity diagnostics throughout the Universe.
  • SN 2013dy is a Type Ia supernova for which we have compiled an extraordinary dataset spanning from 0.1 to ~ 500 days after explosion. We present 10 epochs of ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared (NIR) spectra with HST/STIS, 47 epochs of optical spectra (15 of them having high resolution), and more than 500 photometric observations in the BVrRiIZYJH bands. SN 2013dy has a broad and slowly declining light curve (delta m(B) = 0.92 mag), shallow Si II 6355 absorption, and a low velocity gradient. We detect strong C II in our earliest spectra, probing unburned progenitor material in the outermost layers of the SN ejecta, but this feature fades within a few days. The UV continuum of SN 2013dy, which is strongly affected by the metal abundance of the progenitor star, suggests that SN 2013dy had a relatively high-metallicity progenitor. Examining one of the largest single set of high-resolution spectra for a SN Ia, we find no evidence of variable absorption from circumstellar material. Combining our UV spectra, NIR photometry, and high-cadence optical photometry, we construct a bolometric light curve, showing that SN 2013dy had a maximum luminosity of 10.0^{+4.8}_{-3.8} * 10^{42} erg/s. We compare the synthetic light curves and spectra of several models to SN 2013dy, finding that SN 2013dy is in good agreement with a solar-metallicity W7 model.
  • Context. Some circumstellar-interacting (CSI) supernovae (SNe) are produced by the explosions of massive stars that have lost mass shortly before the SN explosion. There is evidence that the precursors of some SNe IIn were luminous blue variable (LBV) stars. For a small number of CSI SNe, outbursts have been observed before the SN explosion. Eruptive events of massive stars are named as SN impostors (SN IMs) and whether they herald a forthcoming SN or not is still unclear. The large variety of observational properties of CSI SNe suggests the existence of other progenitors, such as red supergiant (RSG) stars with superwinds. Furthermore, the role of metallicity in the mass loss of CSI SN progenitors is still largely unexplored. Aims. Our goal is to gain insight on the nature of the progenitor stars of CSI SNe by studying their environments, in particular the metallicity at their locations. Methods. We obtain metallicity measurements at the location of 60 transients (including SNe IIn, SNe Ibn, and SN IMs), via emission-line diagnostic on optical spectra obtained at the Nordic Optical Telescope and through public archives. Metallicity values from the literature complement our sample. We compare the metallicity distributions among the different CSI SN subtypes and to those of other core-collapse SN types. We also search for possible correlations between metallicity and CSI SN observational properties. Results. We find that SN IMs tend to occur in environments with lower metallicity than those of SNe IIn. Among SNe IIn, SN IIn-L(1998S-like) SNe show higher metallicities, similar to those of SNe IIL/P, whereas long-lasting SNe IIn (1988Z-like) show lower metallicities, similar to those of SN IMs. The metallicity distribution of SNe IIn can be reproduced by combining the metallicity distributions of SN IMs (that may be produced by major outbursts of massive stars like LBVs) and SNe IIP (produced by RSGs). The same applies to the distributions of the Normalized Cumulative Rank (NCR) values, which quantifies the SN association to H II regions. For SNe IIn, we find larger mass-loss rates and higher CSM velocities at higher metallicities. The luminosity increment in the optical bands during SN IM outbursts tend to be larger at higher metallicity, whereas the SN IM quiescent optical luminosities tend to be lower. Conclusions. The difference in metallicity between SNe IIn and SN IMs suggests that LBVs are only one of the progenitor channels for SNe IIn, with 1988Z-like and 1998S-like SNe possibly arising from LBVs and RSGs, respectively. Finally, even though linedriven winds likely do not primarily drive the late mass-loss of CSI SN progenitors, metallicity has some impact on the observational properties of these transients. Key words. supernovae: general - stars: evolution - galaxies: abundances
  • We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the optical transient SN 2011A. Our data spans 140 days after discovery including $BVRIu'g'r'i'z'$ photometry and 11 epochs of optical spectroscopy. Originally classified as a type IIn supernova (SN IIn) due to the presence of narrow H$\alpha$ emission, this object shows exceptional characteristics. Firstly, the light curve shows a double plateau; a property only observed before in the impostor SN 1997bs. Secondly, SN 2011A has a very low luminosity ($M_{V}=-15.72$), placing it between normal luminous SNe IIn and SN impostors. Thirdly, SN 2011A shows low velocity and high equivalent width absorption close to the sodium doublet, which increases with time and is most likely of circumstellar origin. This evolution is also accompanied by a change of line profile; when the absorption becomes stronger, a P-Cygni profile appears. We discuss SN 2011A in the context of interacting SNe IIn and SN impostors, which appears to confirm the uniqueness of this transient. While we favour an impostor origin for SN 2011A, we highlight the difficulty in differentiating between terminal and non-terminal interacting transients.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SN 2009ib, a Type II-P supernova in NGC 1559. This object has moderate brightness, similar to those of the intermediate-luminosity SNe 2008in and 2009N. Its plateau phase is unusually long, lasting for about 130 days after explosion. The spectra are similar to those of the subluminous SN 2002gd, with moderate expansion velocities. We estimate the $^{56}$Ni mass produced as $0.046 \pm 0.015\,{\rm M}_{\sun}$. We determine the distance to SN 2009ib using both the expanding photosphere method (EPM) and the standard candle method. We also apply EPM to SN 1986L, a type II-P SN that exploded in the same galaxy. Combining the results of different methods, we conclude the distance to NGC 1559 as $D=19.8 \pm 3.0$ Mpc. We examine archival, pre-explosion images of the field taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, and find a faint source at the position of the SN, which has a yellow colour ($(V-I)_0 = 0.85$ mag). Assuming it is a single star, we estimate its initial mass as $M_{\rm ZAMS}=20\,{\rm M}_{\sun}$. We also examine the possibility, that instead of the yellow source the progenitor of SN 2009ib is a red supergiant star too faint to be detected. In this case we estimate the upper limit for the initial zero-age main sequence mass of the progenitor to be $\sim 14-17\,{\rm M}_{\sun}$. In addition, we infer the physical properties of the progenitor at the explosion via hydrodynamical modelling of the observables, and estimate the total energy as $\sim 0.55 \times 10^{51}$~erg, the pre-explosion radius as $\sim 400\,{\rm R}_{\sun}$, and the ejected envelope mass as $\sim 15\,{\rm M}_{\sun}$, which implies that the mass of the progenitor before explosion was $\sim 16.5-17\,{\rm M}_{\sun}$.