• We report the effect of exchange frustration on the magnetocaloric properties of GdCrTiO$_5$ compound. Due to the highly exchange-frustrated nature of magnetic interaction, in GdCrTiO$_5$, the long-range antiferromagnetic ordering occurs at much lower temperature $T_N$=0.9 K and the magnetic cooling power enhances dramatically relative to that observed in several geometrically frustrated systems. Below 5 K, isothermal magnetic entropy change (-$\Delta S_{\rm m}$) is found to be 36 J kg$^{-1}$ K$^{-1}$, for a field change ($\Delta H$) of 7 T. Further, -$\Delta S_{\rm m}$ does not decrease from its maximum value with decreasing in $T$ down to very low temperatures and is reversible in nature. The adiabatic temperature change, $\Delta T_{\rm ad}$, is 15 K for $\Delta H$=7 T. These magnetocaloric parameters are significantly larger than that reported for several potential magnetic refrigerants, even for small and moderate field changes. The present study not only suggests that GdCrTiO$_5$ could be considered as a potential magnetic refrigerant at cryogenic temperatures but also promotes further studies on the role of exchange frustration on magnetocaloric effect. In contrast, only the role of geometrical frustration on magnetocaloric effect has been previously reported theoretically and experimentally investigated on very few systems.
  • We present a far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) imaging study of recent star formation in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2336 using the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UVIT). NGC 2336 is nearly face-on in morphology and has a multi-armed, branching spiral structure which is associated with star forming regions distributed mainly along the spiral arms and the co-rotation ring around the bar. We have identified 72 star forming knots in the disk, of which only two are in the inter-arm regions and 6 in the co-rotation ring. We have tabulated their positions and estimated their luminosities, sizes, star formation rates, colors, ages and masses. The ages and masses of these star forming knots were estimated using the Starburst99 stellar evolutionary synthesis models. The star forming knots have FUV and NUV mean sizes of 485 pc and 408 pc respectively and mean stellar masses of 9.8 $\times 10^{5}$ M$_{\odot}$ that range from 5.6 $\times 10^{5}$ to 1.1 $\times 10^{6}$ M$_{\odot}$. Their star formation rates vary from 6.9 $\times 10^{-4}$ to 2.2 $\times 10^{-2}$ M$_{\odot}$/yr in NUV and from 4.5 $\times 10^{-4}$ to 1.8 $\times 10^{-2}$ M$_{\odot}$/yr in FUV. The FUV-NUV colour of the knots is found to be bluest in the central region and becomes progressively redder as the radius increases. Our results suggest that star formation in disks with spiral structure is driven by the spiral density wave and is best traced by UV imaging as it encompasses clusters spanning a wide range of star forming ages and stellar masses.
  • We present a study of the HI and optical properties of nearby ($z$ $\le$ 0.1) Low Surface Brightness galaxies (LSBGs). We started with a literature sample of $\sim$900 LSBGs and divided them into three morphological classes: spirals, irregulars and dwarfs. Of these, we could use $\sim$490 LSBGs to study their HI and stellar masses, colours and colour magnitude diagrams, and local environment, compare them with normal, High Surface Brightness (HSB) galaxies and determine the differences between the three morphological classes. We found that LSB and HSB galaxies span a similar range in HI and stellar masses, and have a similar $M_{\rm HI}$/$M_{\star}$--$M_{\star}$ relationship. Among the LSBGs, as expected, the spirals have the highest average HI and stellar masses, both of about 10$^{9.8}$ $M_\odot$. The LSGBs' ($g$--$r$) integrated colour is nearly constant as function of HI mass for all classes. In the colour magnitude diagram, the spirals are spread over the red and blue regions whereas the irregulars and dwarfs are confined to the blue region. The spirals also exhibit a steeper slope in the $M_{\rm HI}$/$M_{\star}$--$M_{\star}$ plane. Within their local environment we confirmed that LSBGs are more isolated than HSB galaxies, and LSB spirals more isolated than irregulars and dwarfs. Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical tests on the HI mass, stellar mass and number of neighbours indicates that the spirals are a statistically different population from the dwarfs and irregulars. This suggests that the spirals may have different formation and HI evolution than the dwarfs and irregulars.
  • Galaxy mergers play a crucial role in the formation of massive galaxies and the buildup of their bulges. An important aspect of the merging process is the in-spiral of the supermassive black-holes (SMBHs) to the centre of the merger remnant and the eventual formation of a SMBH binary. If both the SMBHs are accreting they will form a dual or binary active galactic nucleus (DAGN). The final merger remnant is usually very bright and shows enhanced star formation. In this paper we summarize the current sample of DAGN from previous studies and describe methods that can be used to identify strong DAGN candidates from optical and spectroscopic surveys. These methods depend on the Doppler separation of the double peaked AGN emission lines, the nuclear velocity dispersion of the galaxies and their optical/UV colours. We describe two high resolution, radio observations of DAGN candidates that have been selected based on their double peaked optical emission lines (DPAGN). We also examine whether DAGN host galaxies have higher star formation rates (SFRs) compared to merging galaxies that do not appear to have DAGN. We find that the SFR is not higher for DAGN host galaxies. This suggests that the SFRs in DAGN host galaxies is due to the merging process itself and not related to the presence of two AGN in the system.
  • New results are reported from the operation of the PICO-60 dark matter detector, a bubble chamber filled with 52 kg of C$_3$F$_8$ located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory. As in previous PICO bubble chambers, PICO-60 C$_3$F$_8$ exhibits excellent electron recoil and alpha decay rejection, and the observed multiple-scattering neutron rate indicates a single-scatter neutron background of less than 1 event per month. A blind analysis of an efficiency-corrected 1167-kg-day exposure at a 3.3-keV thermodynamic threshold reveals no single-scattering nuclear recoil candidates, consistent with the predicted background. These results set the most stringent direct-detection constraint to date on the WIMP-proton spin-dependent cross section at 3.4 $\times$ 10$^{-41}$ cm$^2$ for a 30-GeV$\thinspace$c$^{-2}$ WIMP, more than one order of magnitude improvement from previous PICO results.
  • The PICASSO dark matter search experiment operated an array of 32 superheated droplet detectors containing 3.0 kg of C$_{4}$F$_{10}$ and collected an exposure of 231.4 kgd at SNOLAB between March 2012 and January 2014. We report on the final results of this experiment which includes for the first time the complete data set and improved analysis techniques including \mbox{acoustic} localization to allow fiducialization and removal of higher activity regions within the detectors. No signal consistent with dark matter was observed. We set limits for spin-dependent interactions on protons of $\sigma_p^{SD}$~=~1.32~$\times$~10$^{-2}$~pb (90\%~C.L.) at a WIMP mass of 20 GeV/c$^{2}$. In the spin-independent sector we exclude cross sections larger than $\sigma_p^{SI}$~=~4.86~$\times$~10$^{-5 }$~pb~(90\% C.L.) in the region around 7 GeV/c$^{2}$. The pioneering efforts of the PICASSO experiment have paved the way forward for a next generation detector incorporating much of this technology and experience into larger mass bubble chambers.
  • We present high resolution radio continuum observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at 6, 8.5, 11.5 and 15 GHz of the double-peaked emission-line galaxy 2MASXJ12032061+1319316. The radio emission has a prominent S-shaped morphology with highly symmetric radio jets that extend over a distance of $\sim1.5^{\prime\prime}$ (1.74~kpc) on either side of the core of size $\sim0.1^{\prime\prime}$(116~pc). The radio jets have a helical structure resembling the precessing jets in the galaxy NGC~326 which has confirmed dual active galactic nuclei (AGN). The nuclear bulge velocity dispersion gives an upper limit of $(1.56\pm$0.26$)\times$10$^8$~M$_{\odot}$ for the total mass of nuclear black hole(s). We present a simple model of precessing jets in 2MASXJ1203 and find that the precession timescale is around 10$^5$ years: this matches the source lifetime estimate via spectral aging. We find that the expected super massive black hole (SMBH) separation corresponding to this timescale is 0.02 pc. We used the double peaked emission lines in 2MASXJ1203 to determine an orbital speed for a dual AGN system and the associated jet precession timescale, which turns out to be more than the Hubble time, making it unfeasible. We conclude that the S-shaped radio jets are due to jet precession caused either by a binary/dual SMBH system, a single SMBH with a tilted accretion disk or a dual AGN system where a close pass of the secondary SMBH in the past has given rise to jet precession.
  • We present HI observations of four giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxies UGC 1378, UGC 1922, UGC 4422 and UM 163 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We include HI results on UGC 2936, UGC 6614 and Malin 2 from literature. HI is detected from all the galaxies and the extent is roughly twice the optical size; in UM 163, HI is detected along a broken disk encircling the optical galaxy. We combine our results with those in literature to further understand these systems. The main results are the following: (1) The peak HI surface densities in GLSB galaxies are several times 10^21 cm^{-2} . The HI mass is between 0.3 - 4 x 10^10 M_Sun/yr, dynamical mass ranges from a few times 10^11 M_Sun/yr to a few times 10^12 M_Sun/yr. (2) The rotation curves of GLSB galaxies are flat to the outermost measured point with rotation velocities of the seven GLSB galaxies being between 225 and 432 km s^{-1}. (3) Recent star formation traced by near-ultraviolet emission in five GLSB galaxies in our sample appears to be located in rings around the galaxy centre. We suggest that this could be due to a stochastic burst of star formation at one location in the galaxy being propagated along a ring over a rotation period. (4) The Hi is correlated with recent star formation in five of the seven GLSB galaxies.
  • We present a near-infrared (NIR) imaging study of barred low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies using the TIFR near-infrared Spectrometer and Imager (TIRSPEC). LSB galaxies are dark matter dominated, late type spirals that have low luminosity stellar disks but large neutral hydrogen (HI) gas disks. Using SDSS images of a very large sample of LSB galaxies derived from the literature, we found that the barred fraction is only 8.3%. We imaged twenty five barred LSB galaxies in the J, H, K$_S$ wavebands and twenty nine in the K$_S$ band. Most of the bars are much brighter than their stellar disks, which appear to be very diffuse. Our image analysis gives deprojected mean bar sizes of $R_{b}/R_{25}$ = 0.40 and ellipticities $e$ $\approx$ 0.45, which are similar to bars in high surface brightness galaxies. Thus, although bars are rare in LSB galaxies, they appear to be just as strong as bars found in normal galaxies. There is no correlation of $R_{b}/R_{25}$ or $e$ with the relative HI or stellar masses of the galaxies. In the (J-K$_S$) color images most of the bars have no significant color gradient which indicates that their stellar population is uniformly distributed and confirms that they have low dust content.
  • New data are reported from a second run of the 2-liter PICO-2L C$_3$F$_8$ bubble chamber with a total exposure of 129$\,$kg-days at a thermodynamic threshold energy of 3.3$\,$keV. These data show that measures taken to control particulate contamination in the superheated fluid resulted in the absence of the anomalous background events observed in the first run of this bubble chamber. One single nuclear-recoil event was observed in the data, consistent both with the predicted background rate from neutrons and with the observed rate of unambiguous multiple-bubble neutron scattering events. The chamber exhibits the same excellent electron-recoil and alpha decay rejection as was previously reported. These data provide the most stringent direct detection constraints on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-proton spin-dependent scattering to date for WIMP masses $<$ 50$\,$GeV/c$^2$.
  • New data are reported from the operation of the PICO-60 dark matter detector, a bubble chamber filled with 36.8 kg of CF$_3$I and located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory. PICO-60 is the largest bubble chamber to search for dark matter to date. With an analyzed exposure of 92.8 livedays, PICO-60 exhibits the same excellent background rejection observed in smaller bubble chambers. Alpha decays in PICO-60 exhibit frequency-dependent acoustic calorimetry, similar but not identical to that reported recently in a C$_3$F$_8$ bubble chamber. PICO-60 also observes a large population of unknown background events, exhibiting acoustic, spatial, and timing behaviors inconsistent with those expected from a dark matter signal. These behaviors allow for analysis cuts to remove all background events while retaining $48.2\%$ of the exposure. Stringent limits on weakly interacting massive particles interacting via spin-dependent proton and spin-independent processes are set, and most interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA modulation signal as dark matter interacting with iodine nuclei are ruled out.
  • We present the detection of molecular gas from galaxies located in nearby voids using the CO line emission as a tracer. The observations were done using the 45m Nobeyama Radio Telescope. Void galaxies lie in the most under dense parts of our universe and a significant fraction of them are gas rich, late type spiral galaxies. Although isolated, they have ongoing star formation but appear to be slowly evolving compared to galaxies in denser environments. Not much is known about their star formation properties or cold gas content. In this study we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively high IRAS fluxes or Ha line luminosities, both of which signify ongoing star formation. All five galaxies appear to be isolated and two lie within the Bootes void. We detected CO line emission from four of the five galaxies in our sample and the molecular gas masses lie between 10^8 to 10^9 Msolar. We did follow-up Ha imaging observations of three detected galaxies using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope and determined their star formation rates (SFRs). The SFR varies from 0.2 to 1 Msolar/yr, which is similar to that observed in local galaxies. Our study indicates that although void galaxies reside in under dense regions, their disks contain molecular gas and have star formation rates similar to galaxies in denser environments.
  • New data are reported from the operation of a 2-liter C$_3$F$_8$ bubble chamber in the 2100 meter deep SNOLAB underground laboratory, with a total exposure of 211.5 kg-days at four different recoil energy thresholds ranging from 3.2 keV to 8.1 keV. These data show that C3F8 provides excellent electron recoil and alpha rejection capabilities at very low thresholds, including the first observation of a dependence of acoustic signal on alpha energy. Twelve single nuclear recoil event candidates were observed during the run. The candidate events exhibit timing characteristics that are not consistent with the hypothesis of a uniform time distribution, and no evidence for a dark matter signal is claimed. These data provide the most sensitive direct detection constraints on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering to date, with significant sensitivity at low WIMP masses for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering.
  • We present a multifrequency radio continuum study of seven giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxies using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). GLSB galaxies are optically faint, dark-matter dominated systems that are poorly evolved and have large HI gas disks. Our sample consists of GLSB galaxies that show signatures of nuclear activity in their optical spectra. We detect radio emission from the nuclei of all the seven galaxies. Five galaxies have nuclear spectral indices that range from 0.12 to -0.44 and appear to be core-dominated; the two galaxies have a steeper spectrum. Two of the galaxies, UGC 2936 and UGC 4422 show significant radio emission from their disks. In our 610 MHz observations of UGC 6614, we detect radio lobes associated with the radio-loud active galactic nucleus (AGN). The lobes have a spectral index of -1.06+/-0.12. The star formation rates estimated from the radio emission, for the entire sample range from 0.15 to 3.6 M{solar} yr^{-1} . We compare the radio images with the near-ultraviolet (NUV) images from GALEX and near-infrared (NIR) images from 2MASS. The galaxies present a diversity of relative NUV, NIR and radio emission, supporting an episodic star formation scenario for these galaxies. Four galaxies are classified members of groups and one is classified as isolated. Our multiwavlength study of this sample suggests that the environment plays an important role in the evolution of these galaxies.
  • We present the detection of molecular gas using CO(1-0) line emission and follow up Halpha imaging observations of galaxies located in nearby voids. The CO(1-0) observations were done using the 45m telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO) and the optical observations were done using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT). Although void galaxies lie in the most under dense parts of our universe, a significant fraction of them are gas rich, spiral galaxies that show signatures of ongoing star formation. Not much is known about their cold gas content or star formation properties. In this study we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies using the NRO. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively higher IRAS fluxes or Halpha line luminosities. CO(1--0) emission was detected in four galaxies and the derived molecular gas masses lie between (1 - 8)E+9 Msun. The H$\alpha$ imaging observations of three galaxies detected in CO emission indicates ongoing star formation and the derived star formation rates vary between from 0.2 - 1.0 Msun/yr, which is similar to that observed in local galaxies. Our study shows that although void galaxies reside in under dense regions, their disks may contain molecular gas and have star formation rates similar to galaxies in denser environments.
  • We present GMRT 1280 MHz radio continuum observations and follow-up optical studies of the disk and nuclear star formation in a sample of low luminosity bulgeless galaxies. The main aim is to understand bulge formation and overall disk evolution in these late type galaxies. We detected radio continuum from five of the twelve galaxies in our sample; the emission is mainly associated with disk star formation. Only two of the detected galaxies had extended radio emission; the others had patchy disk emission. In the former two galaxies, NGC3445 and NGC4027, the radio continuum is associated with star formation triggered by tidal interactions with nearby companion galaxies. We did follow-up Halpha imaging and nuclear spectroscopy of both galaxies using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT). The Halpha emission is mainly associated with the strong spiral arms. The nuclear spectra indicate ongoing nuclear star formation in NGC3445 and NGC4027 which maybe associated with nuclear star clusters. No obvious signs of AGN activity were detected. Although nearly bulgeless, both galaxies appear to have central oval distortions in the R band images; these could represent pseudobulges that may later evolve into large bulges. We thus conclude that tidal interactions are an important means of bulge formation and disk evolution in bulgeless galaxies; without such triggers these galaxies appear to be low in star formation and overall disk evolution.
  • Recent results from the PICASSO dark matter search experiment at SNOLAB are reported. These results were obtained using a subset of 10 detectors with a total target mass of 0.72 kg of 19F and an exposure of 114 kgd. The low backgrounds in PICASSO allow recoil energy thresholds as low as 1.7 keV to be obtained which results in an increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV/c^2. No dark matter signal was found. Best exclusion limits in the spin dependent sector were obtained for WIMP masses of 20 GeV/c^2 with a cross section on protons of sigma_p^SD = 0.032 pb (90% C.L.). In the spin independent sector close to the low mass region of 7 GeV/c2 favoured by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, cross sections larger than sigma_p^SI = 1.41x10^-4 pb (90% C.L.) are excluded.
  • We present Chandra detections of x-ray emission from the AGN in two giant Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies, UGC 2936 and UGC 1455. Their x-ray luminosities are 1.8\times10^{42} ergs/s and 1.1\times10^{40} ergs/s respectively. Of the two galaxies, UGC 2936 is radio loud. Together with another LSB galaxy UGC 6614 (XMM archival data) both appear to lie above the X-ray-Radio fundamental plane and their AGN have black hole masses that are low compared to similar galaxies lying on the correlation. However, the bulges in these galaxies are well developed and we detect diffuse x-ray emission from four of the eight galaxies in our sample. Our results suggest that the bulges of giant LSB galaxies evolve independently of their halo dominated disks which are low in star formation and disk dynamics. The centers follow an evolutionary path similar to that of bulge dominated normal galaxies on the Hubble Sequence but the LSB disks remain unevolved. Thus the bulge and disk evolution are decoupled and so whatever star formation processes produced the bulges did not affect the disks.
  • We present preliminary results of a study of the low frequency radio continuum emission from the nuclei of Giant Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies. We have mapped the emission and searched for extended features such as radio lobes/jets associated with AGN activity. LSB galaxies are poor in star formation and generally less evolved compared to nearby bright spirals. This paper presents low frequency observations of 3 galaxies; PGC 045080 at 1.4 GHz, 610 MHz, 325MHz, UGC 1922 at 610 MHz and UGC 6614 at 610 MHz. The observations were done with the GMRT. Radio cores as well as extended structures were detected and mapped in all three galaxies; the extended emission may be assocated with jets/lobes associated with AGN activity. Our results indicate that although these galaxies are optically dim, their nuclei can host AGN that are bright in the radio domain.
  • Many physics topics to be studied by the D0 experiment during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron ppbar collider give rise to final states containing b--flavored particles. Examples include Higgs searches, top quark production and decay studies, and full reconstruction of B decays. The sensitivity to such modes has been significantly enhanced by the installation of a silicon based vertex detector as part of the DO detector upgrade for Run II. Interesting events must be identified initially in 100-200 microseconds to be available for later study. This paper describes custom electronics used in the DO trigger system to provide the real--time identification of events having tracks consistent with the decay of b--flavored particles.
  • We present the results of a dedicated campaign on the afterglow of GRB 030329 with the millimeter interferometers of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO), the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA), and with the MAMBO-2 bolometer array on the IRAM 30-m telescope. These observations allow us to trace the full evolution of the afterglow of GRB 030329 at frequencies of 100 GHz and 250 GHz for the first time. The millimeter light curves exhibit two main features: a bright, constant flux density portion and a steep power-law decline. The absence of bright, short-lived millimeter emission is used to show that the GRB central engine was not actively injecting energy well after the burst. The millimeter data support a model, advocated by Berger et al., of a two-component jet-like outflow in which a narrow angle jet is responsible for the high energy emission and early optical afterglow, and a wide-angle jet carrying most of the energy is powering the radio and late optical afterglow emission
  • We present sensitive interferometric 12CO, 13CO and HCN observations of the barred spiral galaxy NGC7479, known to be one of the few barred galaxies with a continuous gas-filled bar. We focus on the investigation and interpretation of 12CO/13CO line intensity ratios, which is facilitated by having more than 90% of the flux in our interferometer maps. The global (9kpc by 2.5kpc) value of the 12CO/13CO ratio is high at 20 - 40. On smaller scales (~ 750 pc), the ratio is found to vary dramatically, reaching values > 30 in large parts of the bar, but dropping to values ~ 5, typical for galactic disks, at a 13CO condensation in the southern part of the bar. We interpret these changes in terms of the relative importance of the contribution of a diffuse molecular component, characterized by unbound gas that has a moderate optical depth in the 12CO(1 - 0) transition. This component dominates the 12CO along the bar and is also likely to play an important role in the center of NGC7479. In the center, the 12CO and the HCN intensity peaks coincide, while the 13CO peak is slightly offset. This can be explained in terms of high gas temperature and density at the 12CO peak position. Along the bar, the relation between the distribution of 12CO, 13CO, dust lanes and velocity gradient is complex. A southern 13CO condensation is found offset from the 12CO ridge that generally coincides with the most prominent dust lanes. It is possible that strong 13CO detections along the bar indicate quiescent conditions, downstream from the major bar shock. Still, these condensations are found close to high velocity gradients. In the central region, the velocity gradient is traced much more closely by 13CO than by 12CO.