• Glass stability (GS) indicates the glass reluctance or ability to crystallise upon heating; it can be characterised by several methods and parameters and is frequently used to retrieve glass-forming ability (GFA) of corresponding liquids as the case with which such liquids can be made crystal free via melt-quenching. Here, GS has been determined for the first time on six sub-alkaline glasses having complex (natural) compositions, the most widespread and abundant on Earth. KT, KH, KW, KLL and w2 GS parameters increase linearly and monotonically as a function of SiO2, with very high correlations. Moreover, Tx values and GS parameters highly correlate with GFA via Rc (critical cooling rate), previously determined with ex-situ cooling-induced experiments. Therefore, GS scales with GFA for natural silicate compositions. In addition, the in-situ Rc value of B100 measured with DSC results > 45 {\deg}C/min (> 2700 {\deg}C/h), broadly corroborating the Rc of about 150 {\deg}C/min (9000 {\deg}C/h) determined ex-situ. In turn, relevant solidification parameters on heating or cooling can be obtained by DSC investigations also for chemically complex (natural) systems, similar to simple silicate systems. These outcomes are relevant for lavas or magmas that re-heat glass-bearing volcanic rocks, as well as for fabricate glass-ceramic materials with desirable texture and composition of phases starting from abundant and very cheap raw volcanic rocks.
  • We present the results of deep \chandra\ imaging of the central region of the Extended Groth Strip, the AEGIS-X Deep (AEGIS-XD) survey. When combined with previous \chandra\ observations of a wider area of the strip, AEGIS-X Wide (AEGIS-XW; Laird et~al. 2009), these provide data to a nominal exposure depth of 800ks in the three central ACIS-I fields, a region of approximately $0.29$~deg$^{2}$. This is currently the third deepest X-ray survey in existence, a factor $\sim 2-3$ shallower than the Chandra Deep Fields (CDFs) but over an area $\sim 3$ times greater than each CDF. We present a catalogue of 937 point sources detected in the deep \chandra\ observations. We present identifications of our X-ray sources from deep ground-based, Spitzer, GALEX and HST imaging. Using a likelihood ratio analysis, we associate multi band counterparts for 929/937 of our X-ray sources, with an estimated 95~\% reliability, making the identification completeness approximately 94~\% in a statistical sense. Reliable spectroscopic redshifts for 353 of our X-ray sources are provided predominantly from Keck (DEEP2/3) and MMT Hectospec, so the current spectroscopic completeness is $\sim 38$~per cent. For the remainder of the X-ray sources, we compute photometric redshifts based on multi-band photometry in up to 35 bands from the UV to mid-IR. Particular attention is given to the fact that the vast majority the X-ray sources are AGN and require hybrid templates. Our photometric redshifts have mean accuracy of $\sigma=0.04$ and an outlier fraction of approximately 5\%, reaching $\sigma=0.03$ with less than 4\% outliers in the area covered by CANDELS . The X-ray, multi-wavelength photometry and redshift catalogues are made publicly available.
  • Massive galaxies in the distant Universe form stars at much higher rates than today. Although direct resolution of the star forming regions of these galaxies is still a challenge, recent molecular gas observations at the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer enable us to study the star formation efficiency on subgalactic scales around redshift z = 1.2. We present a method for obtaining the gas and star formation rate (SFR) surface densities of ensembles of clumps composing galaxies at this redshift, even though the corresponding scales are not resolved. This method is based on identifying these structures in position-velocity diagrams corresponding to slices within the galaxies. We use unique IRAM observations of the CO(3-2) rotational line and DEEP2 spectra of four massive star forming distant galaxies - EGS13003805, EGS13004291, EGS12007881, and EGS13019128 in the AEGIS terminology - to determine the gas and SFR surface densities of the identifiable ensembles of clumps that constitute them. The integrated CO line luminosity is assumed to be directly proportional to the total gas mass, and the SFR is deduced from the [OII] line. We identify the ensembles of clumps with the angular resolution available in both CO and [OII] spectroscopy; i.e., 1-1.5". SFR and gas surface densities are averaged in areas of this size, which is also the thickness of the DEEP2 slits and of the extracted IRAM slices, and we derive a spatially resolved Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation on a scale of ~8 kpc. The data generally indicates an average depletion time of 1.9 Gyr, but with significant variations from point to point within the galaxies.
  • We report matched resolution, imaging spectroscopy of the CO J=3-2 line (with the IRAM Plateau de Bure millimeter interferometer) and of the H-alpha line (with LUCI at the Large Binocular Telescope)in the massive z=1.53 main-sequence galaxy EGS 13011166, as part of the "Plateau de Bure high-z, blue sequence survey (PHIBSS). We combine these data with HST V-J-J-H-band maps to derive spatially resolved distributions of stellar surface density, star formation rate, molecular gas surface density, optical extinction and gas kinematics. The spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas are remarkably similar and are well modeled by a turbulent, globally Toomre unstable rotating disk. The stellar surface density distribution is smoother than the clumpy rest-frame UV/optical light distribution, and peaks in an obscured, star forming massive bulge near the dynamical center. The molecular gas surface density and the effective optical screen extinction track each other and are well modeled by a 'mixed' extinction model. The inferred slope of the spatially resolved molecular gas to star formation rate relation depends strongly on the adopted extinction model and can vary from 0.8 to 1.7. For the preferred mixed dust-gas model we find a near linear slope.
  • We present the results of a search for extended X-ray sources and their corresponding galaxy groups from 800-ks Chandra coverage of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). This yields one of the largest X-ray selected galaxy group catalogs from a blind survey to date. The red-sequence technique and spectroscopic redshifts allow us to identify 100$%$ of reliable sources, leading to a catalog of 52 galaxy groups. The groups span the redshift range $z\sim0.066-1.544$ and virial mass range $M_{200}\sim1.34\times 10^{13}-1.33\times 10^{14}M_\odot$. For the 49 extended sources which lie within DEEP2 and DEEP3 Galaxy Redshift Survey coverage, we identify spectroscopic counterparts and determine velocity dispersions. We select member galaxies by applying different cuts along the line of sight or in projected spatial coordinates. A constant cut along the line of sight can cause a large scatter in scaling relations in low-mass or high-mass systems depending on the size of cut. A velocity dispersion based virial radius can more overestimate velocity dispersion in comparison to X-ray based virial radius for low mass systems. There is no significant difference between these two radial cuts for more massive systems. Independent of radial cut, overestimation of velocity dispersion can be created in case of existence of significant substructure and also compactness in X-ray emission which mostly occur in low mass systems. We also present a comparison between X-ray galaxy groups and optical galaxy groups detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method (VDM) for DEEP2 data in this field.
  • The shutdown of star formation in galaxies is generally termed `quenching'. Although quenching may occur through a variety of processes, the exact mechanism(s) that is in fact responsible for quenching is still in question. This paper addresses quenching by searching for traces of possible quenching processes through their effects on galaxy structural parameters such as surface stellar mass density and Sersic index (n). We analyze the rest-frame U-B color correlations versus these structural parameters using a sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.5< z<0.8 from the DEEP2/AEGIS survey. We find that Sersic index (n) has the smallest overlap region among all tested parameters and resembles a step-function with a threshold value of n=2.3. There exists, however, a significant population of outliers with blue colors yet high n values that seem to contradict this behavior. We hypothesize that their Sersic values may be distorted by bursts of star formation, AGNs, and/or poor fits, leading us to consider central surface stellar mass density as an alternative to Sersic index. Not only does it correct the outliers, it also forms a tight relationship with color, suggesting that the innermost structure of galaxies is most physically linked with quenching. Furthermore, at z~0.65, the majority of the blue cloud galaxies cannot simply fade onto the red sequence since their GIM2D bulge masses are only half as large on average as the bulge masses of similar red sequence galaxies, thus demonstrating that stellar mass must absolutely increase at the centers of galaxies as they quench. We discuss a two-stage model for quenching in which galaxy star formation rates are controlled by their dark halos while they are still in the blue cloud and a second quenching process sets in later, associated with the central stellar mass build-up.
  • We use the first systematic samples of CO millimeter emission in z>1 'main-sequence' star forming galaxies (SFGs) to study the metallicity dependence of the conversion factor {\alpha}CO, from CO line luminosity to molecular gas mass. The molecular gas depletion rate inferred from the ratio of the star formation rate (SFR) to CO luminosity, is ~1 Gyr-1 for near-solar metallicity galaxies with stellar masses above M_S~1e11 M_sun. In this regime the depletion rate does not vary more than a factor of two to three as a function of molecular gas surface density, or redshift between z~0 and 2. Below M_S the depletion rate increases rapidly with decreasing metallicity. We argue that this trend is not caused by starburst events, by changes in the physical parameters of the molecular clouds, or by the impact of the fundamental metallicity-SFR-stellar mass relation. A more probable explanation is that the conversion factor is metallicity dependent and that star formation can occur in 'CO-dark' gas. The trend is also expected theoretically from the effect of enhanced photodissociation of CO by ultraviolet radiation at low metallicity. From the available z~0 and z~1-3 samples we constrain the slope of the log({\alpha}CO) -log (metallicity) relation to range between -1 and -2, fairly insensitive to the assumed slope of the gas-star formation rate relation. Because of the lower metallicities near the peak of the galaxy formation activity at z~1-2 compared to z~0, we suggest that molecular gas masses estimated from CO luminosities have to be substantially corrected upward for galaxies below M_S.
  • The extragalactic background light (EBL) is of fundamental importance both for understanding the entire process of galaxy evolution and for gamma-ray astronomy. However, the overall spectrum of the EBL between 0.1 and 1000 microns has never been determined directly neither from observed luminosity functions (LFs), over a wide redshift range, nor from any multiwavelength observation of galaxy spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The evolving, overall spectrum of the EBL is derived here utilizing a novel method based on observations only. The changing fractions of quiescent galaxies, star-forming galaxies, starburst galaxies and active galactic nucleus (AGN) galaxies from redshift 0.2 to 1 are estimated, and two alternative extrapolations of SED types to higher redshifts are considered. This allows calculation of the evolving EBL. The EBL uncertainties in our modelling based directly on the data are quantified, and their consequences for attenuation of very-high-energy gamma-rays due to pair production on the EBL are discussed. It is concluded that the EBL seems well constrained from the UV to the mid-IR at an intensity level roughly matching galaxy count data. Independent efforts from IR and gamma-ray astronomy are needed in order to reduce the uncertainties in the far-IR.
  • The extragalactic background light (EBL) is of fundamental importance both for understanding the entire process of galaxy evolution and for gamma-ray astronomy, but the overall spectrum of the EBL between 0.1-1000 microns has never been determined directly from galaxy spectral energy distribution (SED) observations over a wide redshift range. The evolving, overall spectrum of the EBL is derived here utilizing a novel method based on observations only. This is achieved from the observed evolution of the rest-frame K-band galaxy luminosity function up to redshift 4 (Cirasuolo et al. 2010), combined with a determination of galaxy SED-type fractions. These are based on fitting SWIRE templates to a multiwavelength sample of about 6000 galaxies in the redshift range from 0.2 to 1 from the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). The changing fractions of quiescent galaxies, star-forming galaxies, starburst galaxies and AGN galaxies in that redshift range are estimated, and two alternative extrapolations of SED-types to higher redshifts are considered. This allows calculation of the evolution of the luminosity densities from the UV to the IR, the evolving star formation rate density of the universe, the evolving contribution to the bolometric EBL from the different galaxy populations including AGN galaxies and the buildup of the EBL. Our EBL calculations are compared with those from a semi-analytic model, from another observationally-based model and observational data. The EBL uncertainties in our modeling based directly on the data are quantified, and their consequences for attenuation of very high energy gamma-rays due to pair production on the EBL are discussed. It is concluded that the EBL is well constrained from the UV to the mid-IR, but independent efforts from infrared and gamma-ray astronomy are needed in order to reduce the uncertainties in the far-IR.
  • We construct examples of smooth 4-dimensional manifolds M supporting a locally CAT(0)-metric, whose universal cover X satisfy Hruska's isolated flats condition, and contain 2-dimensional flats F with the property that the boundary at infinity of F defines a nontrivial knot in the boundary at infinity of X. As a consequence, we obtain that the fundamental group of M cannot be isomorphic to the fundamental group of any Riemannian manifold of nonpositive sectional curvature. In particular, M is a locally CAT(0)-manifold which does not support any Riemannian metric of nonpositive sectional curvature.
  • Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas. Since this is relatively rare in the local Universe, galaxies like the Milky Way form only a few new stars per year. Typical massive galaxies in the distant Universe formed stars an order of magnitude more rapidly. Unless star formation was significantly more efficient, this difference suggests that young galaxies were much more gas rich. Molecular gas observations in the distant Universe have so far been largely restricted to very luminous, rare objects, including mergers and quasars. Here we report the results of a systematic survey of molecular gas in samples of typical massive star forming galaxies at <z>~1.2 and 2.3, when the Universe was 40% and 24% of its current age. Our measurements provide empirical evidence that distant star forming galaxies indeed were gas rich, and that the star formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch. The average fraction of cold gas relative to total galaxy baryonic mass at z= 2.3 and z=1.2 is ~44% and 34%, three to ten times higher than in today's massive spiral galaxies. The slow decrease between z~2 and 1 probably requires a mechanism of semi-continuous replenishment of fresh gas to the young galaxies.
  • We present the AEGIS-X survey, a series of deep Chandra ACIS-I observations of the Extended Groth Strip. The survey comprises pointings at 8 separate positions, each with nominal exposure 200ks, covering a total area of approximately 0.67 deg2 in a strip of length 2 degrees. We describe in detail an updated version of our data reduction and point source detection algorithms used to analyze these data. A total of 1325 band-merged sources have been found to a Poisson probability limit of 4e-6, with limiting fluxes of 5.3e-17 erg/cm2/s in the soft (0.5-2 keV) band and 3.8e-16 erg/cm2/s in the hard (2-10 keV) band. We present simulations verifying the validity of our source detection procedure and showing a very small, <1.5%, contamination rate from spurious sources. Optical/NIR counterparts have been identified from the DEEP2, CFHTLS, and Spitzer/IRAC surveys of the same region. Using a likelihood ratio method, we find optical counterparts for 76% of our sources, complete to R(AB)=24.1, and, of the 66% of the sources that have IRAC coverage, 94% have a counterpart to a limit of 0.9 microJy at 3.6 microns (m(AB)=23.8). After accounting for (small) positional offsets in the 8 Chandra fields, the astrometric accuracy of the Chandra positions is found to be 0.8 arcsec RMS, however this number depends both on the off-axis angle and the number of detected counts for a given source. All the data products described in this paper are made available via a public website.
  • We present the quantitative rest-frame B morphological evolution and galaxy merger fractions at 0.2 < z < 1.2 as observed by the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). We use the Gini coefficent and M_20 to identify major mergers and classify galaxy morphology for a volume-limited sample of 3009 galaxies brighter than 0.4 L_B^*, assuming pure luminosity evolution of 1.3 M_B per unit redshift. We find that the merger fraction remains roughly constant at 10 +/- 2% for 0.2 < z < 1.2. The fraction of E/S0/Sa increases from 21+/- 3% at z ~ 1.1 to 44 +/- 9% at z ~ 0.3, while the fraction of Sb-Ir decreases from 64 +/- 6% at z ~ 1.1 to 47 +/- 9% at z ~ 0.3. The majority of z < 1.2 Spitzer MIPS 24 micron sources with L(IR) > 10^11 L_sun are disk galaxies, and only ~ 15% are classified as major merger candidates. Edge-on and dusty disk galaxies (Sb-Ir) are almost a third of the red sequence at z ~ 1.1, while E/S0/Sa makeup over 90% of the red sequence at z ~ 0.3. Approximately 2% of our full sample are red mergers. We conclude (1) the galaxy merger rate does not evolve strongly between 0.2 < z < 1.2; (2) the decrease in the volume-averaged star-formation rate density since z ~ 1 is a result of declining star-formation in disk galaxies rather than a disappearing population of major mergers; (3) the build-up of the red sequence at z < 1 can be explained by a doubling in the number of spheroidal galaxies since z ~ 1.2.
  • First-order, rhombohedral to orthorhombic, stress-induced phase transitions have been evidenced by bulk charge-stress measurements and X-ray diffraction derived lattice strain measurements in [001]c-poled PZN-4.5PT. The transitions are induced by uniaxial, compressive loads applied either along or perpendicular to the poling direction. In each case, they occur via rotation of the polar vector in the Cm monoclinic plane and the induced lattice strain is hysteretic yet reversible. Although no depoling is observed in the transverse mode, net depolarization is observed under longitudinal stress which is important for the use of [001]c-poled PZN-PT and PMN-PT single crystals in Tonpilz-type underwater projectors.
  • We present 0.5 -160 micron Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of galaxies, detected at 70microns with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS), using broadband imaging data from Spitzer and ground-based telescopes. Spectroscopic redshifts, in the range 0.2<z<1.5, have been measured as part of the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe2 (DEEP2) project. Based on the SEDs we explore the nature and physical properties of the sources. Using the optical spectra we derive Hbeta and [OII]-based Star Formation Rates (SFR) which are 10-100 times lower than SFR estimates based on IR and radio. The median offset in SFR between optical and IR is reduced by a factor of ~3 when we apply a typical extinction corrections. We investigate mid-to-far infrared correlations for low redshift (>0.5) and high redshift (0.5<z<1.2) bins. Using this unique ``far-infrared'' selected sample we derive an empirical mid to far-infrared relationship that can be used to estimate the infrared energy budget of galaxies in the high-redshift universe. Our sample can be used as a template to translate far-infrared luminosities into bolometric luminosities for high redshift objects.
  • We study 87 Extremely Red Objects (EROs), selected both to have color redder than R-[3.6] = 4.0, and to have confirmed spectroscopic redshifts. Together, these two constraints result in this sample populating a fairly narrow redshift range at 0.76 < z < 1.42. The key new ingredient included here is deep Spitzer Space Telescope InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) data. Based on [3.6]-[8.0] color, we demonstrate that it is possible to classify EROs into early-type, dusty starburst, or power-law (AGN) types. We present ultraviolet to mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images, both of which support our simple IRAC color classification.
  • We present a 200 ksec Chandra observation of seven spectroscopically selected, high redshift (0.75 < z < 1.03) galaxy groups and clusters discovered by the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). X-ray emission at the locations of these systems is consistent with background. The 3-sigma upper limits on the bolometric X-ray luminosities (L_X) of these systems put a strong constraint on the relation between L_X and the velocity dispersion of member galaxies sigma_gal at z~1; the DEEP2 systems have lower luminosity than would be predicted by the local relation. Our result is consistent with recent findings that at high redshift, optically selected clusters tend to be X-ray underluminous. A comparison with mock catalogs indicates that it is unlikely that this effect is entirely caused by a measurement bias between sigma_gal and the dark matter velocity dispersion. Physically, the DEEP2 systems may still be in the process of forming and hence not fully virialized, or they may be deficient in hot gas compared to local systems. We find only one possibly extended source in this Chandra field, which happens to lie outside the DEEP2 coverage.
  • In this the first of a series of Letters, we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z ~ 1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS X-ray (0.5 - 10 keV), GALEX ultraviolet (1200 - 2500 Angstrom), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey optical (3600 - 9000 Angstroms), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500 - 9000 Angstroms), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS optical (4400 - 8500 Angstroms), Palomar/WIRC near-infrared (1.2 - 2.2 microns), Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared (3.6 - 8.0 microns), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24 - 70 microns), and VLA radio continuum (6 - 20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.
  • We explore the environment of z~1 AGN using a sample of 53 spectroscopically identified X-ray sources in the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey. We quantify the local density in the vicinity of an X-ray source by measuring the projected surface density of spectroscopically identified optical galaxies within a radius defined by the 3rd nearest neighbour. Our main result is that X-ray selected AGN at z~1 avoid underdense regions at the 99.89% confidence level. Moreover, although we find that the overall population shares the same (rich) environment with optical galaxies of similar U-B and M_B, there is also tentative evidence (96%) that AGN with blue colors (U-B<1) reside in denser environments compared to optical galaxies. We argue that the results above are a consequence of the whereabouts of massive galaxies, capable of hosting supermassive black holes at their centers, with available cold gas reservoirs, the fuel for AGN activity. At z~1 an increasing fraction of such systems are found in dense regions.
  • The evolution of the B-band galaxy luminosity function is measured using a sample of more than 11,000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey. The rest-frame M_B versus U-B color-magnitude diagram of DEEP2 galaxies shows that the color-magnitude bi-modality seen in galaxies locally is still present at redshifts z > 1. Dividing the sample at the trough of this color bimodality into predominantly red and blue galaxies, we find that the luminosity function of each galaxy color type evolves differently. Blue counts tend to shift to brighter magnitudes at constant number density, while the red counts remain largely constant at a fixed absolute magnitude. Using Schechter functions with fixed faint-end slopes we find that M*_B for blue galaxies brightens by ~ 1.3 magnitudes per unit redshift, with no significant evolution in number density. For red galaxies M*_B brightens somewhat less with redshift, while the formal value of phi* declines. When the population of blue galaxies is subdivided into two halves using the rest-frame color as the criterion, the measured evolution of both blue subpopulations is very similar.
  • Number counts of galaxy clusters offer a very promising probe of the Dark Energy (DE) equation-of-state parameter, $w$. The basic goal is to measure abundances of these objects as a function of redshift, compare this to a theoretical prediction, and infer the values of cosmological parameters. Various teams have proposed such a measurement, including the South Pole Telescope, the Dark Energy Survey and the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey. The specific study discussed here detects clusters and smaller galaxy groups in the three-dimensional distribution of galaxies inferred from a large spectroscopic redshift survey. This method allows the abundance, $N$, of groups and clusters to be measured as a function of \emph{velocity dispersion}, as well as of redshift, permitting a more sensitive test of cosmology.
  • The DEEP2 and COMBO-17 surveys are used to study the evolution of the luminosity function of red and blue galaxies to $z \sim 1$. Schechter function fits show that, since $z = 1$, $M^*_B$ dims by $\sim$ 1.3 mag per unit redshift for both color classes, $\phi^*$ of blue galaxies shows little change, while $\phi^*$ for red galaxies has formally nearly quadrupled. At face value, the number density of blue galaxies has remained roughly constant since $ z = 1$, whereas that of red galaxies has been rising. Luminosity densities support both conclusions, but we note that most red-galaxy evolution occurs between our data and local surveys and in our highest redshift bin, where the data are weakest. We discuss the implications of having most red galaxies emerge after $z = 1$ from precursors among the blue population, taking into account the properties of local and distant E/S0s. We suggest a ``mixed'' scenario in which some blue galaxies have their star-formation quenched in gas-rich mergers, migrate to the red sequence with a variety of masses, and merge further on the red sequence in one or more purely stellar mergers. E/S0s of a given mass today will have formed via different routes, in a manner that may help to explain the fundamental plane and other local scaling laws.
  • Many examples of nonpositively curved closed manifolds arise as blow-ups of projective hyperplane arrangements. If the hyperplane arrangement is associated to a finite reflection group W, and the blow-up locus is W-invariant, then the resulting manifold M will admit a cell decomposition whose maximal cells are all combinatorially isomorphic to a given convex polytope P. In other words, M admits a tiling with tile P. The universal covers of such examples yield tilings of R^n whose symmetry groups are generated by involutions but are not, in general, reflection groups. We begin a study of these ``mock reflection groups'', and develop a theory of tilings that includes the examples coming from blow-ups and that generalizes the corresponding theory of reflection tilings. We apply our general theory to classify the examples coming from blow-ups in the case where the tile P is either the permutohedron or the associahedron.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has discovered a population of broad absorption line quasars with various extreme properties. Many show absorption from metastable states of FeII with varying excitations; several objects are almost completely absorbed bluewards of MgII; at least one shows stronger absorption from FeIII than FeII, indicating temperatures T>35000 K in the absorbing region; and one object even seems to have broad H-beta absorption. Many of these extreme BALs are also heavily reddened, though `normal' BALs (particularly LoBALs) from SDSS also show evidence for internal reddening.
  • This is the third paper in a series aimed at finding high-redshift quasars from five-color (u'g'r'i'z') imaging data taken along the Celestial Equator by the SDSS during its commissioning phase. In this paper, we first present the observations of 14 bright high-redshift quasars (3.66<z<4.77, i^*<20) discovered in the SDSS Fall Equatorial Stripe, and the SDSS photometry of two previously known high-redshift quasars in the same region of the sky. Combined with the quasars presented in previous papers, we define a color-selected flux-limited sample of 39 quasars at 3.6 < z < 5.0 and i^*<20, covering a total effective area of 182 deg^2. From this sample, we estimate the average spectral power law slope in the rest-frame ultraviolet for quasars at z~4 to be -0.79 with a standard deviation of 0.34, and the average rest-frame equivalent width of the Ly alpha+N V emission line to be 69 A with a standard deviation of 18 A. The selection completeness of this multicolor sample is determined from the model colors of high-redshift quasars, taking into account the distributions of emission line strengths, intrinsic continuum slope, the line and continuum absorption from intervening material, and the effects of photometric errors. The average completeness of this sample is about 75%. The selection function calculated in this paper will be used to correct the incompleteness of this color-selected sample and to derive the high-redshift quasar luminosity function in a subsequent paper. In the Appendix, we present the observations of an additional 18 faint quasars (3.57<z<4.80, 20.1<i^*<20.8) discovered in the region on the sky that has been imaged twice. Several quasars presented in this paper exhibit interesting properties, including a radio-loud quasar at z=4.77, and a narrow-line quasar (FWHM = 1500 km s^-1) at z=3.57.