• We demonstrate the control of electron-electron correlation in frustrated double ionization (FDI) of the two-electron triatomic molecule D$_{3}^{+}$ when driven by two orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields. We employ a three-dimensional semi-classical model that fully accounts for the electron and nuclear motion in strong fields. We analyze the FDI probability and the distribution of the momentum of the escaping electron along the polarization direction of the longer wavelength and more intense laser field. These observables when considered in conjunction bear clear signatures of the prevalence or absence of electron-electron correlation in FDI, depending on the time-delay between the two laser pulses. We find that D$_{3}^{+}$ is a better candidate compared to H$_{2}$ for demonstrating also experimentally that electron-electron correlation indeed underlies FDI.
  • A three-dimensional semiclassical model is used to study double ionization of Ar when driven by a near-infrared and near-single-cycle laser pulse for intensities ranging from 0.85$\times$10$^{14}$ W/cm$^{2}$ to 5$\times$10$^{14}$ W/cm$^{2}$. Asymmetry parameters, distributions of the sum of the two electron momentum components along the direction of the polarization of the laser field and correlated momenta are computed as a function of intensity and of the carrier envelope phase. A very good agreement is found with recently obtained results in kinematically complete experiments employing near-single-cycle laser pulses. Moreover, the contribution of the direct and delayed pathways of double ionization is investigated for the above observables. Finally, an experimentally obtained anti-correlation momentum pattern at higher intensities is reproduced with the three-dimensional semiclassical model and shown to be due to a transition from strong to soft recollisions with increasing intensity.
  • Studies of strong field ionization have historically relied on the strong field approximation, which neglects all spatial dependence in the forces experienced by the electron after ionization. More recently, the small spatial inhomogeneity introduced by the long-range Coulomb potential has been linked to a number of important features in the photoelectron spectrum, such as Coulomb asymmetry, Coulomb focusing, and the low energy structure (LES). Here, we demonstrate by combined quantum and classical simulations that a small time-varying spatial dependence in the laser electric field creates a prominent higher energy peak at energies above the "classical cut-off" for direct electrons. This higher energy structure (HES) originates from direct electrons ionized near the peak of a single half-cycle of the laser pulse. The HES is separated from all other ionization events (providing sub-cycle resolution) and is highly sensitive to the carrier envelope phase (CEP). The large accumulation of electrons with tuneable energy suggests a promising method for creating a localized source of electron pulses of attosecond duration using tabletop laser technology.
  • Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as ATI and HHG. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated by them with high temporal and spatial resolution.
  • The dissociation of an H$_2^+$ molecular-ion beam by linearly polarized, carrier-envelope-phase-tagged 5 fs pulses at 4$\times10^{14} $W/cm$^2$ with a central wavelength of 730 nm was studied using a coincidence 3D momentum imaging technique. Carrier-envelope-phase-dependent asymmetries in the emission direction of H$^+$ fragments relative to the laser polarization were observed. These asymmetries are caused by interference of odd and even photon number pathways, where net-zero photon and 1-photon interference predominantly contributes at H$^+$+H kinetic energy releases of 0.2 -- 0.45 eV, and net-2-photon and 1-photon interference contributes at 1.65 -- 1.9 eV. These measurements of the benchmark H$_2^+$ molecule offer the distinct advantage that they can be quantitatively compared with \textit{ab initio} theory to confirm our understanding of strong-field coherent control via the carrier-envelope phase.
  • We report the first experimental observation of non-adiabatic field-free orientation of a heteronuclear diatomic molecule (CO) induced by an intense two-color (800 and 400 nm) femtosecond laser field. We monitor orientation by measuring fragment ion angular distributions after Coulomb explosion with an 800 nm pulse. The orientation of the molecules is controlled by the relative phase of the two-color field. The results are compared to quantum mechanical rigid rotor calculations. The demonstrated method can be applied to study molecular frame dynamics under field-free conditions in conjunction with a variety of spectroscopy methods, such as high-harmonic generation, electron diffraction and molecular frame photoemission.