• The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) partners small groups of educators with a research astronomer for a year-long authentic research project. This program aligns well with the characteristics of high-quality professional development (PD) programs and has worked with a total of 103 educators since 2005. In this paper, surveys were explored that were obtained from 74 different educators, at up to four waypoints during the course of 13 months, incorporating data from the class of 2010 through the class of 2017. This paper investigates how participating teachers describe their motivations for participating in NITARP as evidenced in these feedback forms. Analysis of self-reported data allows a mapping onto a continuum ranging from more inward-focused to more outward-focused; there is a shift from more inward-focused responses to more outward-focused responses. This insight into teacher motivations has implications for how the educators might be supported during their year with the program. This work provides a new way of parameterizing why educators participate in PD programs that require a considerable investment of time. NITARP, since it has many qualities of successful PD, serves as a model for similar PD programs in other STEM subjects. Likewise, the analysis method might also be useful to similarly evaluate other PD programs.
  • NITARP, the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program, partners small groups of predominantly high school educators with research astronomers for a year-long research project. This paper presents a summary of how NITARP works and the lessons learned over the last 13 years. The program lasts a calendar year, January to January, and involves three ~week-long trips: to the American Astronomical Society (AAS) winter meeting, to Caltech in the summer (with students), and back to a winter AAS meeting (with students) to present their results. Because NITARP has been running since 2009, and its predecessor ran from 2005-2008, there have been many lessons learned over the last 13 years that have informed the development of the program. The most critical is that scientists must see their work with the educators on their team as a partnership of equals who have specialized in different professions. NITARP teams appear to function most efficiently with approximately 5 people: a mentor astronomer, a mentor teacher (who has been through the program before), and 3 new educators. Educators are asked to step into the role of learner and develop their question-asking skills as they work to develop an understanding of a subject in which they will not have command of all the information and processes needed. Critical to the success of each team is the development of communication skills and fluid plan of action to keep the lines of communication open. This program has allowed more than 100 educators to present more than 60 total science posters at the AAS.
  • We describe a successful effort to produce a laser comb around 1.55 $\mu$m in the astronomical H band using a method based on a line-referenced, electro-optical-modulation frequency comb. We discuss the experimental setup, laboratory results, and proof of concept demonstrations at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and the Keck-II telescope. The laser comb has a demonstrated stability of $<$ 200 kHz, corresponding to a Doppler precision of ~0.3 m/s. This technology, when coupled with a high spectral resolution spectrograph, offers the promise of $<$1 m/s radial velocity precision suitable for the detection of Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of cool M-type stars.
  • In this work, we generalise linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability theory to include equilibrium pressure anisotropy in the fluid part of the analysis. A novel 'single-adiabatic' (SA) fluid closure is presented which is complementary to the usual 'double-adiabatic' (CGL) model and has the advantage of naturally reproducing exactly the MHD spectrum in the isotropic limit. As with MHD and CGL, the SA model neglects the anisotropic perturbed pressure and thus loses non-local fast-particle stabilisation present in the kinetic approach. Another interesting aspect of this new approach is that the stabilising terms appear naturally as separate viscous corrections leaving the isotropic SA closure unchanged. After verifying the self-consistency of the SA model, we re-derive the projected linear MHD set of equations required for stability analysis of tokamaks in the MISHKA code. The cylindrical wave equation is derived analytically as done previously in the spectral theory of MHD and clear predictions are made for the modification to fast-magnetosonic and slow ion sound speeds due to equilibrium anisotropy.
  • We report on first evidence of wave activity during neutral beam heating in KSTAR plasmas: 40 kHz magnetic fluctuations with a toroidal mode number of n=1. Our analysis suggests this a beta-induced Alfven eigenmode resonant with the q=1 surface. A kinetic analysis, when coupled with electron temperature measurements from electron cyclotron emission and ion/electron temperature ratios from crystallography, enables calculation of the frequency evolution, which is in agreement with observations. Complementary detailed MHD modelling of the magnetic configuration and wave modes supports the BAE mode conclusion, by locating an n=1 mode separated from the continuum in the core region. Finally, we have computed the threshold to marginal stability for a range of ion temperature profiles. These suggest the BAE can be driven unstable by energetic ions when the ion temperature radial gradient is sufficiently large. Our findings suggest that mode existence could be used as a form of inference for temperature profile consistency in the radial interval of the mode, thereby extending the tools of MHD spectroscopy.
  • We have observed Eta Carinae over 34 nights between 4th January 2009 and 27th March 2009 covering the estimated timeframe for a predicted spectroscopic event related to a suspected binary system concealed within the homunculus nebula. A photometric minimum feature was confirmed to be periodic and comparison to a previous event indicated that the period to within our error at 2022.6 +/-1.0 d. Using the E-region standard star system, the apparent V magnitudes determined for the local comparison stars were HD303308 8.14+/-0.02, HD 93205 7.77 +/-0.03 and HD93162 8.22 +/-0.05. The latter star was found to be dimmer than previously reported.