• Combining the catalogue of galaxy morphologies in the COSMOS field and the sample of H$\alpha$ emitters at redshifts $z=0.4$ and $z=0.84$ of the HiZELS survey, we selected $\sim$ 220 star-forming bulgeless systems (S\'ersic index $n \leq 1.5$) at both epochs. We present their star formation properties and we investigate their contribution to the star formation rate function (SFRF) and global star formation rate density (SFRD) at $z < 1$. For comparison, we also analyse H$\alpha$ emitters with more structurally evolved morphologies that we split into two classes according to their S\'ersic index $n$: intermediate ($ 1.5 < n \leq 3 $) and bulge-dominated ($n > 3$). At both redshifts the SFRF is dominated by the contribution of bulgeless galaxies and we show that they account for more than 60% of the cosmic SFRD at $z < 1$. The decrease of the SFRD with redshift is common to the three morphological types but it is stronger for bulge-dominated systems. Star-forming bulgeless systems are mostly located in regions of low to intermediate galaxy densities ($\Sigma \sim 1 - 4$ Mpc$^{-2}$) typical of field-like and filament-like environments and their specific star formation rates (sSFRs) do not appear to vary strongly with local galaxy density. Only few bulgeless galaxies in our sample have high (sSFR $>$ 10$^{-9}$ yr$^{-1}$) and these are mainly low-mass systems. Above $M_* \sim 10^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$ bulgeless are evolving at a "normal" rate (10$^{-9}$ yr$^{-1} <$ sSFR $<$10$^{-10}$ yr$^{-1}$) and in the absence of an external trigger (i.e. mergers/strong interactions) they might not be able to develop a central classical bulge.
  • We study the correlation between far-infared/submm dust emission and atomic gas column density in order to derive the properties of the high Galactic latitude, low density, Milky Way cirrus in the foreground of the Virgo cluster of galaxies. Dust emission maps from 60 to 850 um are obtained from SPIRE observations carried out within the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, complemented by IRAS-IRIS and Planck-HFI maps. Data from the Arecibo legacy Fast ALFA Survey is used to derive atomic gas column densities for two broad velocity components, low and intermediate velocity clouds. Dust emissivities are derived for each gas component and each far-infared/submm band. For the low velocity clouds, we measure an average emissivity 0.79 +/- 0.08 times 1E-20 MJy sr^-1 cm^2 at 250 um. After fitting a modified blackbody to the available bands, we estimated a dust absorption cross-section 0.49 +/- 0.13 times 1E-25 cm^2 H^-1 at 250 um (with dust temperature T = 20.4 +/- 1.5 K and spectral index beta = 1.53 +/- 0.17). The results are in excellent agreement with those obtained by Planck over a much larger coverage of the high Galactic latitude cirrus (50% of the sky vs 0.2% in our work). For dust associated with intermediate velocity gas, we confirm earlier Planck results and find a higher temperature and lower emissivity and cross-section. After subtracting the modelled components, we find regions at scales smaller than 20' where the residuals deviate significantly from the average, cosmic-infrared-background dominated, scatter. These large residuals are most likely due to local variations in the cirrus dust properties (and/or the dust/atomic-gas correlation) or to high-latitude molecular clouds with average N_H2 <~ 1E20 cm^-2. We find no conclusive evidence for intracluster dust emission in Virgo.
  • We present $^{12}$CO(1-0) and $^{12}$CO(2-1) observations of a sample of 20 star-forming dwarfs selected from the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, with oxygen abundances ranging from 12 + log(O/H) ~ 8.1 to 8.8. CO emission is observed in ten galaxies and marginally detected in another one. CO fluxes correlate with the FIR 250 $\mu$m emission, and the dwarfs follow the same linear relation that holds for more massive spiral galaxies extended to a wider dynamical range. We compare different methods to estimate H2 molecular masses, namely a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor and one dependent on H-band luminosity. The molecular-to-stellar mass ratio remains nearly constant at stellar masses <~ 10$^9$ M$_{\odot}$, contrary to the atomic hydrogen fraction, M$_{HI}$/M$_*$, which increases inversely with M$_*$. The flattening of the M$_{H_2}$/M$_*$ ratio at low stellar masses does not seem to be related to the effects of the cluster environment because it occurs for both HI-deficient and HI-normal dwarfs. The molecular-to-atomic ratio is more tightly correlated with stellar surface density than metallicity, confirming that the interstellar gas pressure plays a key role in determining the balance between the two gaseous components of the interstellar medium. Virgo dwarfs follow the same linear trend between molecular gas mass and star formation rate as more massive spirals, but gas depletion timescales, $\tau_{dep}$, are not constant and range between 100 Myr and 6 Gyr. The interaction with the Virgo cluster environment is removing the atomic gas and dust components of the dwarfs, but the molecular gas appears to be less affected at the current stage of evolution within the cluster. However, the correlation between HI deficiency and the molecular gas depletion time suggests that the lack of gas replenishment from the outer regions of the disc is lowering the star formation activity.
  • To assess the effects of the cluster environment on the different components of the interstellar medium, we analyse the FIR-submm properties of a sample of star-forming dwarf (SFD) galaxies detected by the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We determine dust masses and dust temperatures by fitting a modified black body (MBB) function to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Stellar and gas masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and metallicities are obtained from the analysis of a set of ancillary data. Dust is detected in 49 out of 140 optically identified dwarfs covered by the HeViCS field; considering only dwarfs brighter than $m_B$ = 18 mag, this gives a detection rate of 43%. After evaluating different emissivity indices, we find that the FIR-submm SEDs are best-fit by $\beta$=1.5, with a median dust temperature $T_d$ = 22.4 K. Assuming $\beta$=1.5, 67% of the 23 galaxies detected in all five Herschel bands show emission at 500 $\mu$m in excess of the MBB model. The excess is inversely correlated with SFR and stellar masses. To study the variations in the global properties of our sample due to environmental effects, we compare the Virgo SFDs to other Herschel surveys, such as KINGFISH, the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS), and the HeViCS bright galaxy catalogue (BGC). We explore the relations between stellar mass and HI fraction, specific SFR, dust fraction, gas-to-dust ratio over a wide range of stellar masses. Highly HI-deficient Virgo dwarf galaxies are mostly characterised by quenched star formation activity and lower dust fractions giving hints for dust stripping in cluster dwarfs. However, we find that the fraction of dust removed has to be less than that of the HI component. Since the Virgo SFDs are likely to be crossing the cluster for the first time, a longer timescale might be necessary to strip the more centrally concentrated dust distribution.
  • We consider the mean field equation on two-dimensional annular domains, and prove that if $P$ and $Q$ are two blow up points of a blowing-up solution sequence of the equation, then we must have $P=-Q$.
  • The $Herschel$ Fornax Cluster Survey (HeFoCS) is a deep, far-infrared (FIR) survey of the Fornax cluster. The survey is in 5 $Herschel$ bands (100 - 500 $\mu$m) and covers an area of 16 deg$^2$ centred on NGC1399. This paper presents photometry, detection rates, dust masses and temperatures using an optically selected sample from the Fornax Cluster Catalogue (FCC). Our results are compared with those previously obtained using data from the $Herschel$ Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). In Fornax, we detect 30 of the 237 (13%) optically selected galaxies in at least one $Herschel$ band. The global detection rates are significantly lower than Virgo, reflecting the morphological make up of each cluster - Fornax has a lower fraction of late-type galaxies. For galaxies detected in at least 3 bands we fit a modified blackbody with a $\beta = 2$ emissivity. Detected early-type galaxies (E/S0) have a mean dust mass, temperature, and dust-to-stars ratio of $\log_{10}(<M_{dust}>/\mathrm{M_{\odot}}) = 5.82 \pm 0.20$, $<T_{dust}> = 20.82 \pm 1.77$K, and $\log_{10}(M_{dust}/M_{stars}) = -3.87 \pm 0.28$, respectively. Late-type galaxies (Sa to Sd) have a mean dust mass, temperature, and dust-to-stars ratio of $\log_{10}(<M_{dust}>/\mathrm{M_{\odot}}) = 6.54 \pm 0.19$, $<T_{dust}> = 17.47 \pm 0.97$K, and $\log_{10}(M_{dust}/M_{stars}) = -2.93 \pm 0.09$, respectively. The different cluster environments seem to have had little effect on the FIR properties of the galaxies and so we conclude that any environment dependent evolution, has taken place before the cluster was assembled.
  • While usually cosmological initial conditions are assumed to be Gaussian, inflationary theories can predict a certain amount of primordial non-Gaussianity which can have an impact on the statistical properties of the lensing observables. In order to evaluate this effect, we build a large set of realistic maps of different lensing quantities starting from light-cones extracted from large dark-matter only N-body simulations with initial conditions corresponding to different levels of primordial local non-Gaussianity strength $f_{\rm NL}$. Considering various statistical quantities (PDF, power spectrum, shear in aperture, skewness and bispectrum) we find that the effect produced by the presence of primordial non-Gaussianity is relatively small, being of the order of few per cent for values of $|f_{\rm NL}|$ compatible with the present CMB constraints and reaching at most 10-15 per cent for the most extreme cases with $|f_{\rm NL}|=1000$. We also discuss the degeneracy of this effect with the uncertainties due to the power spectrum normalization $\sigma_8$ and matter density parameter $\Omega_{\rm m}$, finding that an error in the determination of $\sigma_8$ ($\Omega_{\rm m}$) of about 3 (10) per cent gives differences comparable with non-Gaussian models having $f_{\rm NL}=\pm 1000$. These results suggest that the possible presence of an amount of primordial non-Gaussianity corresponding to $|f_{\rm NL}|=100$ is not hampering a robust determination of the main cosmological parameters in present and future weak lensing surveys, while a positive detection of deviations from the Gaussian hypothesis is possible only breaking the degeneracy with other cosmological parameters and using data from deep surveys covering a large fraction of the sky.
  • The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) is the deepest, confusion-limited survey of the Virgo Cluster at far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths. The entire survey at full depth covers $\sim$55 sq. deg. in 5 bands (100-500 \micron), encompassing the areas around the central dominant elliptical galaxies (M87, M86 & M49) and extends as far as the NW cloud, the W cloud and the Southern extension. The survey extends beyond this region with lower sensitivity so that the total area covered is 84 sq. deg. In this paper we describe the data, the data acquisition techniques and present the detection rates of the optically selected Virgo Cluster Catalogue (VCC). We detect 254 (34%) of 750 VCC galaxies found within the survey boundary in at least one band and 171 galaxies are detected in all five bands. For the remainder of the galaxies we have measured strict upper limits for their FIR emission. The population of detected galaxies contains early- as well as late-types although the latter dominate the detection statistics. We have modelled 168 galaxies, showing no evidence of a strong synchrotron component in their FIR spectra, using a single-temperature modified blackbody spectrum with a fixed emissivity index ($\beta = 2$). A study of the $\chi^2$ distribution indicates that this model is not appropriate in all cases, and this is supported by the FIR colours which indicate a spread in $\beta$=1--2. Statistical comparison of the dust mass and temperature distributions from 140 galaxies with $\chi^2_{dof=3} < 7.8$ (95% confidence level) shows that late-types have typically colder, more massive dust reservoirs; the early-type dust masses have a mean of ${\rm log}(<M> / M_{\sun}) = 6.3 \pm 0.3 $, while for late-types ${\rm log}(<M> / M_{\sun}) =7.1 \pm 0.1$... (abridged)
  • We present the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS), an 18 square degrees medium-deep survey at 3.6 and 4.5 microns with the post-cryogenic Spitzer Space Telescope to ~2 microJy (AB=23.1) depth of five highly observed astronomical fields (ELAIS-N1, ELAIS-S1, Lockman Hole, Chandra Deep Field South and XMM-LSS). SERVS is designed to enable the study of galaxy evolution as a function of environment from z~5 to the present day, and is the first extragalactic survey both large enough and deep enough to put rare objects such as luminous quasars and galaxy clusters at z>1 into their cosmological context. SERVS is designed to overlap with several key surveys at optical, near- through far-infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths to provide an unprecedented view of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies. In this paper, we discuss the SERVS survey design, the data processing flow from image reduction and mosaicing to catalogs, as well as coverage of ancillary data from other surveys in the SERVS fields. We also highlight a variety of early science results from the survey.
  • Multifrequency radio continuum observations (1.4-22 GHz) of a sample of reddened QSOs are presented. We find a high incidence (13/16) of radio spectral properties, such as low frequency turnovers, high frequency spectral breaks or steep power-law slopes, similar to those observed in powerful compact steep spectrum (CSS) and gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) sources. The radio data are consistent with relatively young radio jets with synchotron ages <1e6-1e7yr. This calculation is limited by the lack of high resolution (milli-arcsec) radio observations. For the one source in the sample that such data are available a much younger radio age is determined, <2e3yr, similar to those of GPS/CSS sources. These findings are consistent with claims that reddened QSOs are young systems captured at the first stages of the growth of their supermassive black holes. It also suggests that expanding radio lobes may be an important feedback mode at the early stages of the evolution of AGN.
  • We describe the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) and the first data that cover the complete survey area (four 4 x 4 deg2 regions). We use these data to measure and compare the global far infrared properties of 78 optically bright galaxies that are selected at 500 \mum and detected in all five far-infrared bands. We show that our measurements and calibration are broadly consistent with previous data obtained by IRAS, ISO, Spitzer and Planck. We use SPIRE and PACS photometry data to produce 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 \mum cluster luminosity distributions. These luminosity distributions are not power laws, but peaked, with small numbers of both faint and bright galaxies. We measure a cluster 100-500 micron far-infrared luminosity density of 1.6(7.0) \pm 0.2 x 10^9 Lsun/Mpc3. This compares to a cluster 0.4-2.5 \mum optical luminosity density of 5.0(20.0) x 10^9 Lsun/Mpc3, some 3.2(2.9) times larger than the far-infrared. A typical photon originates from an optical depth of 0.4\pm0.1. Most of our sample galaxies are well fitted by a single modified blackbody (beta=2), leading to a mean dust mass of log Mdust = 7.31 Msun and temperature of 20.0 K. We also derive both stellar and atomic hydrogen masses from which we calculate mean values for the stars:gas(atomic) and gas(atomic): dust mass ratios of 15.1 and 58.2 respectively. Using our derived dust, atomic gas and stellar masses we estimate cluster mass densities of 8.6(27.8) x 10^6, 4.6(13.9) x 10^8, 7.8(29.7) x 10^9 Msun/Mpc3, respectively for dust, atomic gas and stars. These values are higher than those derived for field galaxies by factors of 39(126), 6(18) and 34(129) respectively. In the above luminosity/mass densities are given using the whole sample with values in brackets using just those galaxies that lie between 17 and 23 Mpc. We provide a data table of flux densities in all the Herschel bands for all 78 bright Virgo cluster galaxies.
  • Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS) radio sources have been successfully used to select powerful radio sources at high redshifts (z>~2). Typically restricted to large-sky surveys and relatively bright radio flux densities, it has gradually become possible to extend the USS search to sub-mJy levels, thanks to the recent appearance of sensitive low-frequency radio facilities. Here a first detailed analysis of the nature of the faintest USS sources is presented. By using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Very Large Array radio observations of the Lockman Hole at 610 MHz and 1.4 GHz, a sample of 58 USS sources, with 610 MHz integrated fluxes above 100 microJy, is assembled. Deep infrared data at 3.6 and 4.5 micron from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) is used to reliably identify counterparts for 48 (83%) of these sources, showing an average total magnitude of [3.6](AB)=19.8 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts for 14 USS sources, together with photometric redshift estimates, improved by the use of the deep SERVS data, for a further 19 objects, show redshifts ranging from z=0.1 to z=2.8, peaking at z~0.6 and tailing off at high redshifts. The remaining 25 USS sources, with no redshift estimate, include the faintest [3.6] magnitudes, with 10 sources undetected at 3.6 and 4.5 micron (typically [3.6]>22-23 mag, from local measurements), which suggests the likely existence of higher redshifts among the sub-mJy USS population. The comparison with the Square Kilometre Array Design Studies Simulated Skies models indicate that Fanaroff-Riley type I radio sources and radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei may constitute the bulk of the faintest USS population, and raises the possibility that the high efficiency of the USS technique for the selection of high redshift sources remains even at the sub-mJy level.
  • We analyse multi-wavelength observations of 32 young star clusters and associations in M33 with known oxygen abundance (8 < 12 + log(O/H) < 8.7), using ultraviolet (UV), optical, mid-infrared (MIR), CO (1-0) and 21-cm line (HI) observations. We derive their spectral energy distribution, and we determine age, bolometric luminosities, masses and the extinction, by comparing the multi-band integrated photometry to single-age stellar population models. The stellar system ages range between 2 and 15 Myr, masses are between 3 x 10^2 and 4 x 10^4 M_sun, and the intrinsic extinction, A_V, varies from 0.3 to 1 mag. We find a correlation between age and extinction, and between the cluster mass and size. The MIR emission shows the presence of a dust component around the clusters whose fractional luminosity at 24 um, L_{24}/L_{Bol}, decreases with the galactocentric distance. However, the total IR luminosity inferred from L_{24} is smaller than what we derive from the extinction corrections. The Halpha luminosity predicted by population synthesis models is larger than the observed one, especially for low-mass systems (M < 10^4 M_sun). Such a difference is reduced, but not erased, when the incomplete sampling of the initial mass function (IMF) at the high-mass end is taken into account. Our results suggest that a non-negligible fraction of UV ionising and non-ionising radiation is leaking into the ISM outside the HII regions. This would be in agreement with the large UV and Halpha diffuse fractions observed in M33, but it implies that stellar systems younger than 3 Myr retain, on average, only 30% of their Lyman continuum photons. However, the uncertainties on cluster ages and the stochastic fluctuations of the IMF do not allow to accurately quantify this issue. We also consider the possibility that this discrepancy is the consequence of a suppressed or delayed formation of the most massive stars.
  • (abridged) We explore the imprints of deviations from Gaussian primordial density fluctuations on the skeleton of the large-scale matter distribution as mapped through cosmological weak lensing. We computed the skeleton length of simulated effective convergence maps covering $\sim 35$ sq. deg each, extracted from a suite of cosmological $n-$body runs with different levels of local primordial non-Gaussianity. The latter is expected to alter the structure formation process with respect to the fiducial Gaussian scenario, and thus to leave a signature on the cosmic web. We found that alterations of the initial conditions consistently modify both the cumulative and the differential skeleton length, although the effect is generically smaller than the cosmic variance and depends on the smoothing of the map prior to the skeleton computation. Nevertheless, the qualitative shape of these deviations is rather similar to their primordial counterparts, implying that skeleton statistics retain good memory of the initial conditions. We performed a statistical analysis in order to find out at what Confidence Level primordial non-Gaussianity could be constrained by the skeleton test on cosmic shear maps of the size we adopted. At 68.3% Confidence Level we found an error on the measured level of primordial non-Gaussianity of $\Delta f_\mathrm{NL}\sim 300$, while at 90% Confidence Level it is of $\Delta f_\mathrm{NL}\sim 500$. While these values by themselves are not competitive with the current constraints, weak lensing maps larger than those used here would have a smaller field-to-field variance, and thus would likely lead to tighter constraints. A rough estimate indicates $\Delta f_\mathrm{NL} \sim$ a few tens at 68.3% Confidence Level for an all-sky weak lensing survey.
  • The GALEX Ultraviolet Virgo Cluster Survey (GUViCS) is a complete blind survey of the Virgo cluster covering about 40 sq. deg. in the far UV (FUV, lambda_eff=1539A, Delta-lambda=442A) and about 120 sq. deg. in the near UV (NUV, lambda_eff=2316A, Delta-lambda=1060A). The goal of the survey is to study the ultraviolet (UV) properties of galaxies in a rich cluster environment, spanning a wide luminosity range from giants to dwarfs, and regardless of prior knowledge of their star formation activity. The UV data will be combined with those in other bands (optical: NGVS; far-infrared - submm: HeViCS; HI: ALFALFA) and with our multizone chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution to make a complete and exhaustive study of the effects of the environment on the evolution of galaxies in high density regions. We present here the scientific objectives of the survey, describing the observing strategy and briefly discussing different data reduction techniques. Using UV data already in-hand for the central 12 sq. deg. we determine the FUV and NUV luminosity functions of the Virgo cluster core for all cluster members and separately for early- and late-type galaxies and compare it to the one obtained in the field and other nearby clusters (Coma, A1367). This analysis shows that the FUV and NUV luminosity functions of the core of the Virgo clusters are flatter (alpha about -1.1) than those determined in Coma and A1367. We discuss the possible origin of this difference
  • The origin of the far-infrared emission from the nearby radio galaxy M87 remains a matter of debate. Some studies find evidence of a far-infrared excess due to thermal dust emission, whereas others propose that the far-infrared emission can be explained by synchrotron emission without the need for an additional dust emission component. We observed M87 with PACS and SPIRE as part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We compare the new Herschel data with a synchrotron model based on infrared, submm and radio data to investigate the origin of the far-infrared emission. We find that both the integrated SED and the Herschel surface brightness maps are adequately explained by synchrotron emission. At odds with previous claims, we find no evidence of a diffuse dust component in M87.
  • We describe the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) and the first data obtained as part of the Science Demonstration Phase (SDP). The data cover a central 4x4 sq deg region of the cluster. We use SPIRE and PACS photometry data to produce 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron luminosity functions (LFs) for optically bright galaxies that are selected at 500 micron and detected in all bands. We compare these LFs with those previously derived using IRAS, BLAST and Herschel-ATLAS data. The Virgo Cluster LFs do not have the large numbers of faint galaxies or examples of very luminous galaxies seen previously in surveys covering less dense environments.
  • By combining Herschel-SPIRE observations obtained as part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey with 21 cm HI data from the literature, we investigate the role of the cluster environment on the dust content of Virgo spiral galaxies.We show for the first time that the extent of the dust disk is significantly reduced in HI-deficient galaxies, following remarkably well the observed 'truncation' of the HI disk. The ratio of the submillimetre-to- optical diameter correlates with the HI-deficiency, suggesting that the cluster environment is able to strip dust as well as gas. These results provide important insights not only into the evolution of cluster galaxies but also into the metal enrichment of the intra-cluster medium.
  • Passive early-type galaxies (ETGs) provide an ideal laboratory for studying the interplay between dust formation around evolved stars and its subsequent destruction in a hot gas. Using Spitzer-IRS and Herschel data we compare the dust production rate in the envelopes of evolved AGB stars with a constraint on the total dust mass. Early-type galaxies which appear to be truly passively evolving are not detected by Herschel. We thus derive a distance independent upper limit to the dust grain survival time in the hostile environment of ETGs of < 46 +/- 25 Myr for amorphous silicate grains. This implies that ETGs which are detected at far-infrared wavelengths have acquired a cool dusty medium via interaction. Given likely time-scales for ram-pressure stripping, this also implies that only galaxies with dust in a cool (atomic) medium can release dust into the intra-cluster medium.
  • We present a resolved dust analysis of three of the largest angular size spiral galaxies, NGC 4501 and NGC 4567/8, in the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) Science Demonstration field. Herschel has unprecedented spatial resolution at far-infrared wavelengths and with the PACS and SPIRE instruments samples both sides of the peak in the far infrared spectral energy distribution (SED).We present maps of dust temperature, dust mass, and gas-to-dust ratio, produced by fitting modified black bodies to the SED for each pixel. We find that the distribution of dust temperature in both systems is in the range ~19 - 22 K and peaks away from the centres of the galaxies. The distribution of dust mass in both systems is symmetrical and exhibits a single peak coincident with the galaxy centres. This Letter provides a first insight into the future analysis possible with a large sample of resolved galaxies to be observed by Herschel.
  • We present the dust properties of a small sample of Virgo cluster dwarf galaxies drawn from the science demonstration phase data set of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. These galaxies have low metallicities (7.8 < 12 + log(O/H) < 8.3) and star-formation rates < 10^{-1} M_{sun}/yr. We measure the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 100 to 500 um and derive dust temperatures and dust masses. The SEDs are fitted by a cool component of temperature T < 20 K, implying dust masses around 10^{5} M_{sun} and dust-to-gas ratios D within the range 10^{-3}-10^{-2}. The completion of the full survey will yield a larger set of galaxies, which will provide more stringent constraints on the dust content of star-forming dwarf galaxies.
  • The origin of the far-infrared emission from the nearby radio galaxy M87 remains a matter of debate. Some studies find evidence of a far-infrared excess due to thermal dust emission, whereas others propose that the far-infrared emission can be explained by synchrotron emission without the need for an additional dust emission component. We present Herschel PACS and SPIRE observations of M87, taken as part of the science demonstration phase observations of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. We compare these data with a synchrotron model based on mid-infrared, far-infrared, submm and radio data from the literature to investigate the origin of the far-infrared emission. Both the integrated SED and the Herschel surface brightness maps are adequately explained by synchrotron emission. At odds with previous claims, we find no evidence of a diffuse dust component in M87, which is not unexpected in the harsh X-ray environment of this radio galaxy sitting at the core of the Virgo Cluster.
  • We use the Science Demonstration Phase data of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey to search for dust emission of early-type dwarf galaxies in the central regions of the Virgo Cluster as an alternative way of identifying the interstellar medium.We present the first possible far-infrared detection of cluster early-type dwarf galaxies: VCC781 and VCC951 are detected at the 10 sigma level in the SPIRE 250 micron image. Both detected galaxies have dust masses of the order of 10^5 Msun and average dust temperatures ~20K. The detection rate (less than 1%) is quite high compared to the 1.7% detection rate for Hi emission, considering that dwarfs in the central regions are more Hi deficient. We conclude that the removal of interstellar dust from dwarf galaxies resulting from ram pressure stripping, harassment, or tidal effects must be as efficient as the removal of interstellar gas.
  • We present infrared colours (in the 25-500 mic spectral range) and UV to radio continuum spectral energy distributions of a sample of 51 nearby galaxies observed with SPIRE on Herschel. The observed sample includes all morphological classes, from quiescent ellipticals to active starbursts. Active galaxies have warmer colour temperatures than normal spirals. In ellipticals hosting a radio galaxy, the far-infrared (FIR) emission is dominated bynthe synchrotron nuclear emission. The colour temperature of the cold dust is higher in quiescent E-S0a than in star-forming systems probably because of the different nature of their dust heating sources (evolved stellar populations, X-ray, fast electrons) and dust grain properties. In contrast to the colour temperature of the warm dust, the f350/f500 index sensitive to the cold dust decreases with star formation and increases with metallicity, suggesting an overabundance of cold dust or an emissivity parameter beta<2 in low metallicity, active systems.
  • Several inflationary models predict the possibility that the primordial perturbations of the density field may contain a degree of non-Gaussianity which would influence the subsequent evolution of cosmic structures at large scales. In order to study their impact, we use a set of three cosmological DM-only simulations starting from initial conditions with different levels of non-Gaussianity: f_NL=0,+/-100. More specifically, we focus on the distribution of galaxy clusters at different redshifts and, using suitable scaling relations, we determine their X-ray and SZ signals. Our analysis allows us to estimate the differences in the logN-logS and logN-logY due to the different initial conditions and to predict the cluster counts at different redshifts expected for future surveys (eROSITA and SPT). We also use a second set of simulations assuming a different cosmological scenario to estimate how the dependence on f_NL is degenerate with respect to other parameters. Our results indicate that the effects introduced by a realistic amount of primordial non-Gaussianity are small when compared to the ones connected with current uncertainties in cosmological parameters, particularly with sigma_8. However, if future surveys will be associated with optical follow-up campaigns to determine the cluster redshift, an analysis of the samples at z>1 can provide significant constraints on f_NL. In particular we predict that the SPT cluster survey will be able to detect ~1000 clusters at z>1 for the Gaussian case, with a difference of 15-20 per cent associated to f_NL=+/-100.