• We experimentally study the magnon-photon coupling in a system consitsing of the compensating ferrimagnet gadolinium iron garnet (GdIG) and a three-dimensional microwave cavity. The temperature is varied in order to tune the GdIG magnetization and to observe the transition from the weak coupling regime to the strong coupling regime. By measuring and modelling the complex reflection parameter of the system the effective coupling rate g eff and the magnetization M eff of the sample are extracted. Comparing g eff with the magnon and the cavity decay rate we conclude that the strong coupling regime is easily accessible using GdIG. We show that the effective coupling strength follows the predicted square root dependence on the magnetization.
  • We use electrical detection, in combination with microwave transmission, to investigate both resonant and non-resonant magnon-photon coupling at room temperature. Spin pumping in a dynamically coupled magnon-photon system is found to be distinctly different from previous experiments. Characteristic coupling features such as modes anti-crossing, line width evolution, peculiar line shape, and resonance broadening are systematically measured and consistently analyzed by a theoretical model set on the foundation of classical electrodynamic coupling. Our experimental and theoretical approach pave the way for pursuing microwave coherent manipulation of pure spin current via the combination of spin pumping and magnon-photon coupling.
  • This work reviews and examines two particular issues related with the new technique of electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). This powerful technique has been broadly applied for studying magnetization and spin dynamics over the past few years. The first issue is the relation and distinction between different mechanisms that give rise to a photovoltage via FMR in composite magnetic structures, and the second is the proper analysis of the FMR line shape, which remains the "Achilles heel" in interpreting experimental results, especially for either studying the spin pumping effect or quantifying the spin Hall angles via the electrically detected FMR.