• Low-frequency radio continuum observations of edge-on galaxies are ideal to study cosmic-ray electrons (CREs) in halos via radio synchrotron emission and to measure magnetic field strengths. We obtained new observations of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891 at 129-163 MHz with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and at 13-18 GHz with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) and combine them with recent high-resolution Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 1-2 GHz, enabling us to study the radio continuum emission over two orders of magnitude in frequency. The spectrum of the integrated nonthermal flux density can be fitted by a power law with a spectral steepening towards higher frequencies or by a curved polynomial. Spectral flattening at low frequencies due to free-free absorption is detected in star-forming regions of the disk. The mean magnetic field strength in the halo is 7 +- 2 $\mu$G. The scale heights of the nonthermal halo emission at 146 MHz are larger than those at 1.5 GHz everywhere, with a mean ratio of 1.7 +- 0.3, indicating that spectral ageing of CREs is important and that diffusive propagation dominates. The halo scale heights at 146 MHz decrease with increasing magnetic field strengths which is a signature of dominating synchrotron losses of CREs. On the other hand, the spectral index between 146 MHz and 1.5 GHz linearly steepens from the disk to the halo, indicating that advection rather than diffusion is the dominating CRE transport process. This issue calls for refined modelling of CRE propagation.
  • Diagnostics of polarized emission provide us with valuable information on the Galactic magnetic field and the state of turbulence in the interstellar medium, which cannot be obtained from synchrotron intensity alone. In Paper I (Herron et al. 2017b), we derived polarization diagnostics that are rotationally and translationally invariant in the $Q$-$U$ plane, similar to the polarization gradient. In this paper, we apply these diagnostics to simulations of ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that have a range of sonic and Alfv\'enic Mach numbers. We generate synthetic images of Stokes $Q$ and $U$ for these simulations, for the cases where the turbulence is illuminated from behind by uniform polarized emission, and where the polarized emission originates from within the turbulent volume. From these simulated images we calculate the polarization diagnostics derived in Paper I, for different lines of sight relative to the mean magnetic field, and for a range of frequencies. For all of our simulations, we find that the polarization gradient is very similar to the generalized polarization gradient, and that both trace spatial variations in the magnetoionic medium for the case where emission originates within the turbulent volume, provided that the medium is not supersonic. We propose a method for distinguishing the cases of emission coming from behind or within a turbulent, Faraday rotating medium, and a method to partly map the rotation measure of the observed region. We also speculate on statistics of these diagnostics that may allow us to constrain the physical properties of an observed turbulent region.
  • We analyze the Southern Sky emission in linear polarization at 2.3 GHz as observed by the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey S-PASS. Our purpose is to study the properties of the diffuse Galactic polarized synchrotron as a contaminant to CMB B-mode observations. We study the angular distribution of the S-PASS signal at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes by means of angular power spectra. Power spectra, show a decay of the spectral amplitude as a function of multipole for \ell<200, typical of the diffuse emission. Spectra can be approximated by a power law C_{\ell}\propto\ell^{alpha}, with alpha~-3, and characterized by a B-to-E ratio of ~0.5. We study the synchrotron SED in polarization by computing power spectra of the low frequency WMAP and Planck maps. Results show that the SED, in the frequency range 2.3-33 GHz, is compatible with a power law with beta_s=-3.22\pm0.08. Combining S-PASS polarization maps with those coming from WMAP and Planck we derived a map of the synchrotron spectral index at angular resolution of 2{\deg} on about 30% of the sky. The recovered distribution peaks at the value around -3.2. We also measure a significant spatial correlation between synchrotron and thermal dust signals, as traced by the Planck 353 GHz channel. This correlation reaches about 40% on the larger angular scales, decaying considerably at the degree scales. Finally, we use the S-PASS maps to assess the polarized synchrotron contamination to CMB observations of the B-modes. Moreover, by combining S-PASS data with Planck 353 GHz observations, we recover a map of the minimum level of total polarized foreground contamination to B-modes, finding that there is no region of the sky, at any frequency, where this contamination lies below equivalent tenor-to-scalar ratio ~10^-3. This result confirms the importance of observing both high and low frequency foregrounds in CMB B-mode measurements.
  • The polarization properties of radio sources at very low frequencies (<200 MHz) have not been widely measured, but the new generation of low-frequency radio telescopes, including the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR: a Square Kilometre Array Low pathfinder), now gives us the opportunity to investigate these properties. In this paper, we report on the preliminary development of a data reduction pipeline to carry out polarization processing and Faraday tomography for data from the LOFAR Two-meter Sky Survey (LOTSS) and present the results of this pipeline from the LOTSS preliminary data release region (10h45m - 15h30m right ascension, 45 - 57 degrees declination, 570 square degrees). We have produced a catalog of 92 polarized radio sources at 150 MHz at 4.3 arcminute resolution and 1 mJy rms sensitivity, which is the largest catalog of polarized sources at such low frequencies. We estimate a lower limit to the polarized source surface density at 150 MHz, with our resolution and sensitivity, of 1 source per 6.2 square degrees. We find that our Faraday depth measurements are in agreement with previous measurements and have significantly smaller errors. Most of our sources show significant depolarization compared to 1.4 GHz, but there is a small population of sources with low depolarization indicating that their polarized emission is highly localized in Faraday depth. We predict that an extension of this work to the full LOTSS data would detect at least 3400 polarized sources using the same methods, and probably considerably more with improved data processing.
  • The optimal source-finding strategy for linear polarization data is an unsolved problem, with many inhibitive factors imposed by the technically-challenging nature of polarization observations. Such an algorithm is essential for Square Kilometre Array (SKA) pathfinder surveys, such as the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), as data volumes are significant enough to prohibit manual inspection. We present a new strategy of `Faraday Moments' for source-finding in linear polarization with LOFAR, using the moments of the frequency-dependent full-Stokes data (i.e. the mean, standard deviation, skewness, and excess kurtosis). Through simulations of the sky, we find that moments can identify polarized sources with a high completeness: 98.5% at a signal-to-noise of 5. While the method has low reliability, Rotation Measure (RM) Synthesis can be applied per candidate source to filter out instrumental and spurious detections. This combined strategy will result in a complete and reliable catalogue of polarized sources that includes the full sensitivity of the observational bandwidth. We find that the technique can reduce the number of pixels on which RM Synthesis needs to be performed by a factor of $\approx1\times10^{5}$ for source distributions anticipated with modern radio telescopes. Through tests on LOFAR data, we find that the technique works effectively in the presence of diffuse emission. Extensions of this method are directly applicable to other upcoming radio surveys such as the POlarization Sky Survey of the Universe's Magnetism (POSSUM) with the Australia Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), and the SKA itself.
  • We present new radio and optical images of the nearest radio galaxy Centaurus A and its host galaxy NGC 5128. We focus our investigation on the northern transition region, where energy is transported from the ~5 kpc (~5 arcmin) scales of the Northern Inner Lobe (NIL) to the ~30 kpc (~30 arcmin) scales of the Northern Middle Lobe (NML). Our Murchison Widefield Array observations at 154 MHz and our Parkes radio telescope observations at 2.3 GHz show diffuse radio emission connecting the NIL to the NML, in agreement with previous Australia Telescope Compact Array observations at 1.4 GHz. Comparison of these radio data with our widefield optical emission line images show the relationship between the NML radio emission and the ionised filaments that extend north from the NIL, and reveal a new ionised filament to the east, possibly associated with a galactic wind. Our deep optical images show clear evidence for a bipolar outflow from the central galaxy extending to intermediate scales, despite the non-detection of a southern radio counterpart to the NML. Thus, our observational overview of Centaurus A reveals a number of features proposed to be associated with AGN feedback mechanisms, often cited as likely to have significant effects in galaxy evolution models. As one of the closest galaxies to us, Centaurus A therefore provides a unique laboratory to examine feedback mechanisms in detail.
  • We present a deep, low-frequency radio continuum study of the nearby Fanaroff--Riley class I (FR I) radio galaxy 3C 31 using a combination of LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR; 30--85 and 115--178 MHz), Very Large Array (VLA; 290--420 MHz), Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT; 609 MHz) and Giant Metre Radio Telescope (GMRT; 615 MHz) observations. Our new LOFAR 145-MHz map shows that 3C 31 has a largest physical size of $1.1$ Mpc in projection, which means 3C 31 now falls in the class of giant radio galaxies. We model the radio continuum intensities with advective cosmic-ray transport, evolving the cosmic-ray electron population and magnetic field strength in the tails as functions of distance to the nucleus. We find that if there is no in-situ particle acceleration in the tails, then decelerating flows are required that depend on radius $r$ as $v\propto r^{\beta}$ ($\beta\approx -1$). This then compensates for the strong adiabatic losses due to the lateral expansion of the tails. We are able to find self-consistent solutions in agreement with the entrainment model of Croston & Hardcastle, where the magnetic field provides $\approx$$1/3$ of the pressure needed for equilibrium with the surrounding intra-cluster medium (ICM). We obtain an advective time-scale of $\approx$$190$ Myr, which, if equated to the source age, would require an average expansion Mach number ${\cal M} \approx 5$ over the source lifetime. Dynamical arguments suggest that instead, either the outer tail material does not represent the oldest jet plasma or else the particle ages are underestimated due to the effects of particle acceleration on large scales.
  • LOFAR detected toward 3C 196 linear polarization structures which were found subsequently to be closely correlated with cold filamentary HI structures. The derived direction-dependent HI power spectra revealed marked anisotropies for narrow ranges in velocity, sharing the orientation of the magnetic field as expected for magneto hydrodynamical turbulence. Using the Galactic portion of the Effelsberg-Bonn HI Survey we continue our study of such anisotropies in the HI distribution in direction of two WSRT fields, Horologium and Auriga; both are well known for their prominent radio-polarimetric depolarization canals. At 349 MHz the observed pattern in total intensity is insignificant but polarized intensity and polarization angle show prominent ubiquitous structures with so far unknown origin. Apodizing the HI survey data by applying a rotational symmetric 50 percent Tukey window, we derive average and position angle dependent power spectra. We fit power laws and characterize anisotropies in the power distribution. We use a Gaussian analysis to determine relative abundances for the cold and warm neutral medium. For the analyzed radio-polarimetric targets significant anisotropies are detected in the HI power spectra; their position angles are aligned to the prominent depolarization canals, initially detected by WSRT. HI anisotropies are associated with steep power spectra. Steep power spectra, associated with cold gas, are detected also in other fields. Radio-polarimetric depolarization canals are associated with filamentary HI structures that belong to the cold neutral medium (CNM). Anisotropies in the CNM are in this case linked to a steepening of the power-spectrum spectral index, indicating that phase transitions in a turbulent medium occur on all scales. Filamentary HI structures, driven by thermal instabilities, and radio-polarimetric filaments are associated with each other.
  • We set limits on the presence of the synchrotron cosmic web through the cross-correlation of the 2.3 GHz S-PASS survey with a model of the local cosmic web derived from constrained magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The MHD simulation assumes cosmologically seeded magnetic fields amplified during large-scale structure formation, and a population of relativistic electrons/positrons from proton-proton collisions within the intergalactic medium. We set a model-dependent 3$\sigma$ upper limit on the synchrotron surface brightness of 0.16 mJy arcmin$^{-2}$ at 2.3 GHz in filaments. Extrapolating from magnetic field maps created from the simulation, we infer an upper limit (density-weighted) magnetic field of 0.03 (0.13) $\mu$G in filaments at the current epoch, and a limit on the primordial magnetic field (PMF) of B$_{PMF}$~1.0 nG.
  • We compare two rotationally invariant decomposition techniques on linear polarisation data: the spin-2 spherical harmonic decomposition in two opposite parities, the $E$- and $B$-mode, and the multiscale analysis of the gradient of linear polarisation, $|\nabla \mathbf{P}|$. We demonstrate that both decompositions have similar properties in the image domain and the spatial frequency domain. They can be used as complementary tools for turbulence analysis of interstellar magnetic fields in order to develop a better understanding of the origin of energy sources for the turbulence, the origin of peculiar magnetic field structures and their underlying physics. We also introduce a new quantity $|\nabla EB|$ based on the $E$- and $B$-modes and we show that in the intermediate and small scales limit $|\nabla EB| \simeq |\nabla \mathbf{P}|$. Analysis of the 2.3 GHz S-band Polarization All Sky Survey (S -PASS) shows many extended coherent filament-like features appearing as 'double-jumps' in the $|\nabla \mathbf{P}|$ map that are correlated with negative and positive filaments of $B$-type polarisation. These local asymmetries between the two polarisation types, $E$ and $B$, of the non-thermal Galactic synchrotron emission have an influence on the $E$- and $B$-mode power spectra analyses. The wavelet-based formalism of the polarisation gradient analysis allows us to locate the position of $E$- or $B$-mode features responsible for the local asymmetries between the two polarisation types. In analysed subregions, the perturbations of the magnetic field are trigged by star clusters associated with HII regions, the Orion-Eridanus superbubble and the North Polar Spur at low Galactic latitude.
  • The S-band Polarisation All-Sky Survey (S-PASS) has observed the entire southern sky using the 64-metre Parkes radio telescope at 2.3GHz with an effective bandwidth of 184MHz. The surveyed sky area covers all declinations $\delta\leq 0^\circ$. To analyse compact sources the survey data have been re-processed to produce a set of 107 Stokes $I$ maps with 10.75arcmin resolution and the large scale emission contribution filtered out. In this paper we use these Stokes $I$ images to create a total intensity southern-sky extragalactic source catalogue at 2.3GHz. The source catalogue contains 23,389 sources and covers a sky area of 16,600deg$^2$, excluding the Galactic plane for latitudes $|b|<10^\circ$. Approximately 8% of catalogued sources are resolved. S-PASS source positions are typically accurate to within 35arcsec. At a flux density of 225mJy the S-PASS source catalogue is more than 95% complete, and $\sim$94% of S-PASS sources brighter than 500mJy beam$^{-1}$ have a counterpart at lower frequencies.
  • The Fan Region is one of the dominant features in the polarized radio sky, long thought to be a local (distance < 500 pc) synchrotron feature. We present 1.3-1.8 GHz polarized radio continuum observations of the region from the Global Magneto-Ionic Medium Survey (GMIMS) and compare them to maps of Halpha and polarized radio continuum intensity from 0.408-353 GHz. The high-frequency (> 1 GHz) and low-frequency (< 600 MHz) emission have different morphologies, suggesting a different physical origin. Portions of the 1.5 GHz Fan Region emission are depolarized by about 30% by ionized gas structures in the Perseus Arm, indicating that this fraction of the emission originates >2 kpc away. We argue for the same conclusion based on the high polarization fraction at 1.5 GHz (about 40%). The Fan Region is offset with respect to the Galactic plane, covering -5{\deg} < b < +10{\deg}; we attribute this offset to the warp in the outer Galaxy. We discuss origins of the polarized emission, including the spiral Galactic magnetic field. This idea is a plausible contributing factor although no model to date readily reproduces all of the observations. We conclude that models of the Galactic magnetic field should account for the > 1 GHz emission from the Fan Region as a Galactic-scale, not purely local, feature.
  • The new generation of low-frequency radio telescopes, such as the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR: a Square Kilometre Array-low pathfinder), provides advancements in our capability of probing Galactic magnetism through low-frequency polarimetry. Maps of diffuse polarized radio emission and Faraday rotation can be used to infer properties of, and trace structure in, the magnetic fields in the ISM. However, to date very little of the sky has been probed at high angular and Faraday depth resolution. We observed a 5x5 degree region centred on the nearby galaxy IC342 using LOFAR in the frequency range 115-178 MHz at 4 arcmin resolution and performed Faraday tomography to detect foreground Galactic polarized synchrotron emission separated by Faraday depth (different amounts of Faraday rotation). Our Faraday depth cube shows rich polarized structure, with up to 30 K of polarized emission at 150 MHz. We detect two overlapping diffuse polarized features that are clearly separated in Faraday depth. Faraday-thick structures at such low frequencies would be too strongly depolarized to explain the observations and are therefore rejected. Only Faraday thin structures will not be strongly depolarized; producing such structures requires localized variations in the ratio of synchrotron emissivity to Faraday depth per unit distance, which can arise from several physical phenomena, such as a transition between regions of ionized and neutral gas. We conclude that the observed polarized emission is Faraday thin, and propose that the emission originates from two neutral clouds in the local ISM. We have modeled the Faraday rotation for this line of sight and estimated that the line of sight component of magnetic field of the local ISM for this direction varies between -0.86 and +0.12 uG. We propose that this may be a useful method for mapping magnetic fields within the local ISM.
  • The LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) is a deep 120-168 MHz imaging survey that will eventually cover the entire Northern sky. Each of the 3170 pointings will be observed for 8 hrs, which, at most declinations, is sufficient to produce ~5arcsec resolution images with a sensitivity of ~0.1mJy/beam and accomplish the main scientific aims of the survey which are to explore the formation and evolution of massive black holes, galaxies, clusters of galaxies and large-scale structure. Due to the compact core and long baselines of LOFAR, the images provide excellent sensitivity to both highly extended and compact emission. For legacy value, the data are archived at high spectral and time resolution to facilitate subarcsecond imaging and spectral line studies. In this paper we provide an overview of the LoTSS. We outline the survey strategy, the observational status, the current calibration techniques, a preliminary data release, and the anticipated scientific impact. The preliminary images that we have released were created using a fully-automated but direction-independent calibration strategy and are significantly more sensitive than those produced by any existing large-area low-frequency survey. In excess of 44,000 sources are detected in the images that have a resolution of 25arcsec, typical noise levels of less than 0.5 mJy/beam, and cover an area of over 350 square degrees in the region of the HETDEX Spring Field (right ascension 10h45m00s to 15h30m00s and declination 45d00m00s to 57d00m00s).
  • Protogalactic environments are typically identified using quasar absorption lines, and these galactic building blocks can manifest as Damped Lyman-Alpha Absorbers (DLAs) and Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs). We use radio observations of Faraday effects to test whether DLAs and LLSs host a magnetised medium, by combining DLA and LLS detections throughout the literature with 1.4 GHz polarization data from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). We obtain a control, a DLA, and a LLS sample consisting of 114, 19, and 27 lines-of-sight respectively - all of which are polarized at $\ge8\sigma$ to ensure Rician bias is negligible. Using a Bayesian framework, we are unable to detect either coherent or random magnetic fields in DLAs: the regular coherent magnetic fields within the DLAs must be $\le2.8$ $\mu$G, and the lack of depolarization is consistent with the weakly magnetised gas in DLAs being non-turbulent and quiescent. However, we find mild suggestive evidence that LLSs have coherent magnetic fields: after controlling for the redshift-distribution of our data, we find a 71.5% probability that LLSs have a higher RM than a control sample. We also find strong evidence that LLSs host random magnetic fields, with a 95.5% probability that LLS lines-of-sight have lower polarized fractions than a control sample. The regular coherent magnetic fields within the LLSs must be $\le2.4$ $\mu$G, and the magnetised gas must be highly turbulent with a typical scale on the order of $\approx5$-20 pc, which is similar to that of the Milky Way. This is consistent with the standard dynamo pedagogy, whereby magnetic fields in protogalaxies increase in coherence and strength as a function of cosmic time. Our results are consistent with a hierarchical galaxy formation scenario, with the DLAs, LLSs, and strong magnesium II (MgII) systems exploring three different stages of magnetic field evolution in galaxies.
  • We present a new method for probing the thermal electron content of the Galaxy by spectral analysis of background point sources in the absorption-only limit to the radiative transfer equation. In this limit, calculating the spectral index, $\alpha$, of these sources using a natural logarithm results in an additive factor, which we denote $\alpha_\mathrm{EM}$, resulting from the absorption of radiation due to the Galactic thermal electron population. We find that this effect is important at very low frequencies ($\nu\lesssim200$ MHz), and that the frequency spacing is critical. We model this effect by calculating the emission measure across the sky. A (smooth) thermal electron model for the Galaxy does not fit the observed emission measure distribution, but a simple, cloud-based model to represent the clumpy nature of the warm interstellar medium does. This model statistically reproduces the Galactic emission measure distribution as obtained independently from $H_\alpha$ data well. We find that at the lowest frequencies ($\sim10-50$ MHz), the observed spectral index for a large segment of the Galaxy below Galactic latitudes of $\lesssim15^\circ$ could be changed significantly (i.e., $\alpha_\mathrm{EM}\gtrsim0.1$). This method therefore provides a correction to low-frequency spectral index measurements of extragalactic sources, and provides a sensitive probe of the thermal electron distribution of the Galaxy using current and next-generation low-frequency radio telescopes. We show that this effect should be robustly detectable individually in the strongest sources, and statistically in source samples at a level of $\alpha_\mathrm{EM}\gtrsim0.18,0.06$, and 0.02 for source densities of 10, 100 and 1,000 sources per square degree.
  • We present the first wide area (19 deg$^2$), deep ($\approx120-150$ {\mu}Jy beam$^{-1}$), high resolution ($5.6 \times 7.4$ arcsec) LOFAR High Band Antenna image of the Bo\"otes field made at 130-169 MHz. This image is at least an order of magnitude deeper and 3-5 times higher in angular resolution than previously achieved for this field at low frequencies. The observations and data reduction, which includes full direction-dependent calibration, are described here. We present a radio source catalogue containing 6276 sources detected over an area of $19$\,deg$^2$, with a peak flux density threshold of $5\sigma$. As the first thorough test of the facet calibration strategy, introduced by van Weeren et al., we investigate the flux and positional accuracy of the catalogue. We present differential source counts that reach an order of magnitude deeper in flux density than previously achieved at these low frequencies, and show flattening at 150 MHz flux densities below 10 mJy associated with the rise of the low flux density star-forming galaxies and radio-quiet AGN.
  • The W50/SS433 system is an unusual Galactic outflow-driven object of debatable origin. We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to observe a new 198 pointing mosaic, covering $3^\circ \times 2^\circ$, and present the highest-sensitivity full-Stokes data of W50 to date using wide-field, wide-band imaging over a 2 GHz bandwidth centred at 2.1 GHz. We also present a complementary H$\alpha$ mosaic created using the Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric H$\alpha$ Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS). The magnetic structure of W50 is found to be consistent with the prevailing hypothesis that the nebula is a reanimated shell-like supernova remnant (SNR), that has been re-energised by the jets from SS433. We observe strong depolarization effects that correlate with diffuse H$\alpha$ emission, likely due to spatially-varying Faraday rotation measure (RM) fluctuations of $\ge48$ to 61 rad m$^{-2}$ on scales $\le4.5$ to 6 pc. We also report the discovery of numerous, faint, H$\alpha$ filaments that are unambiguously associated with the central region of W50. These thin filaments are suggestive of a SNR's shock emission, and almost all have a radio counterpart. Furthermore, an RM-gradient is detected across the central region of W50, which we interpret as a loop magnetic field with a symmetry axis offset by $\approx90^{\circ}$ to the east-west jet-alignment axis, and implying that the evolutionary processes of both the jets and the SNR must be coupled. A separate RM-gradient is associated with the termination shock in the Eastern ear, which we interpret as a ring-like field located where the shock of the jet interacts with the circumstellar medium. Future optical observations will be able to use the new H$\alpha$ filaments to probe the kinematics of the shell of W50, potentially allowing for a definitive experiment on W50's formation history.
  • With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations, we have discovered a diverse assembly of steep spectrum emission that is apparently associated with the intra cluster medium (ICM) of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2034. Such a rich variety of complex emission associated with the ICM has been observed in few other clusters. This not only indicates that Abell 2034 is a more interesting and complex system than previously thought but it also demonstrates the importance of sensitive and high-resolution, low-frequency observations. These observations can reveal emission from relativistic particles which have been accelerated to sufficient energy to produce observable emission or have had their high energy maintained by mechanisms in the ICM. The most prominent feature in our maps is a bright bulb of emission connected to two steep spectrum filamentary structures, the longest of which extends perpendicular to the merger axis for 0.5Mpc across the south of the cluster. The origin of these objects is unclear, with no shock detected in the X-ray images and no obvious connection with cluster galaxies or AGNs. We also find that the X-ray bright region of the cluster coincides with a giant radio halo with an irregular morphology and a very steep spectrum. In addition, the cluster hosts up to three possible radio relics, which are misaligned with the cluster X-ray emission. Finally, we have identified multiple regions of emission with a very steep spectral index that seem to be associated with either tailed radio galaxies or a shock.
  • This study aims to characterize linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the 3C196 field, one of the primary fields of the LOFAR-Epoch of Reionization key science project. We have used the high band antennas (HBA) of LOFAR to image this region and Rotation Measure (RM) synthesis to unravel the distribution of polarized structures in Faraday depth. The brightness temperature of the detected Galactic emission is $5-15~{\rm K}$ in polarized intensity and covers the range from -3 to +8 ${\rm rad~m^{-2}}$ in Faraday depth. The most interesting morphological feature is a strikingly straight filament at a Faraday depth of $+0.5~{\rm rad~m^{-2}}$ running from north to south, right through the centre of the field and parallel to the Galactic plane. There is also an interesting system of linear depolarization canals conspicuous in an image showing the peaks of Faraday spectra. We used the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at 350 MHz to image the same region. For the first time, we see some common morphology in the RM cubes made at 150 and 350~{\rm MHz}. There is no indication of diffuse emission in total intensity in the interferometric data, in line with results at higher frequencies and previous LOFAR observations. Based on our results, we determined physical parameters of the ISM and proposed a simple model that may explain the observed distribution of the intervening magneto-ionic medium. The mean line-of-sight magnetic field component, $B_\parallel$, is determined to be $0.3\pm0.1~{\rm \mu G}$ and its spatial variation across the 3C196 field is $0.1~{\rm \mu G}$. The filamentary structure is probably an ionized filament in the ISM, located somewhere within the Local Bubble. This filamentary structure shows an excess in thermal electron density ($n_e B_\parallel>6.2~{\rm cm^{-3}\mu G}$) compared to its surroundings.
  • We present radio continuum and polarization images of the North Polar Spur (NPS) from the Global Magneto-Ionic Medium Survey (GMIMS) conducted with the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory 26-m Telescope. We fit polarization angle versus wavelength squared over 2048 frequency channels from 1280 to 1750 MHz to obtain a Faraday Rotation Measure (RM) map of the NPS. Combining this RM map with a published Faraday depth map of the entire Galaxy in this direction, we derive the Faraday depth introduced by the NPS and the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) in front of and behind the NPS. The Faraday depth contributed by the NPS is close to zero, indicating that the NPS is an emitting only feature. The Faraday depth caused by the ISM in front of the NPS is consistent with zero at b>50 degree, implying that this part of the NPS is local at a distance of approximately several hundred parsecs. The Faraday depth contributed by the ISM behind the NPS gradually increases with Galactic latitude up to b=44 degree, and decreases at higher Galactic latitudes. This implies that either the part of the NPS at b<44 degree is distant or the NPS is local but there is a sign change of the large-scale magnetic field. If the NPS is local, there is then no evidence for a large-scale anti-symmetry pattern in the Faraday depth of the Milky Way. The Faraday depth introduced by the ISM behind the NPS at latitudes b>50 degree can be explained by including a coherent vertical magnetic field.
  • The Gum Nebula is 36 degree wide shell-like emission nebula at a distance of only 450 pc. It has been hypothesised to be an old supernova remnant, fossil HII region, wind-blown bubble, or combination of multiple objects. Here we investigate the magneto-ionic properties of the nebula using data from recent surveys: radio-continuum data from the NRAO VLA and S-band Parkes All Sky Surveys, and H-alpha data from the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas. We model the upper part of the nebula as a spherical shell of ionised gas expanding into the ambient medium. We perform a maximum-likelihood Markov chain Monte-Carlo fit to the NVSS rotation measure data, using the H-halpha data to constrain average electron density in the shell $n_e$. Assuming a latitudinal background gradient in RM we find $n_e=1.3^{+0.4}_{-0.4} {\rm cm}^{-3}$, angular radius $\phi_{\rm outer}=22.7^{+0.1}_{-0.1} {\rm deg}$, shell thickness $dr=18.5^{+1.5}_{-1.4} {\rm pc}$, ambient magnetic field strength $B_0=3.9^{+4.9}_{-2.2} \mu{\rm G}$ and warm gas filling factor $f=0.3^{+0.3}_{-0.1}$. We constrain the local, small-scale (~260 pc) pitch-angle of the ordered Galactic magnetic field to $+7^{\circ}\lesssim\wp\lesssim+44^{\circ}$, which represents a significant deviation from the median field orientation on kiloparsec scales (~-7.2$^{\circ}$). The moderate compression factor $X=6.0\,^{+5.1}_{-2.5}$ at the edge of the H-alpha shell implies that the 'old supernova remnant' origin is unlikely. Our results support a model of the nebula as a HII region around a wind-blown bubble. Analysis of depolarisation in 2.3 GHz S-PASS data is consistent with this hypothesis and our best-fitting values agree well with previous studies of interstellar bubbles.
  • The nuclear starburst in the nearby galaxy M82 provides an excellent laboratory for understanding the physics of star formation. This galaxy has been extensively observed in the past, revealing tens of radio-bright compact objects embedded in a diffuse free-free absorbing medium. Our understanding of the structure and physics of this medium in M82 can be greatly improved by high-resolution images at low frequencies where the effects of free-free absorption are most prominent. The aims of this study are, firstly, to demonstrate imaging using international baselines of the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), and secondly, to constrain low-frequency spectra of compact and diffuse emission in the central starburst region of M82 via high-resolution radio imaging at low frequencies. The international LOFAR telescope was used to observe M82 at 110-126MHz and 146-162MHz. Images were obtained using standard techniques from very long baseline interferometry. images were obtained at each frequency range: one only using international baselines, and one only using the longest Dutch (remote) baselines. The 154MHz image obtained using international baselines is a new imaging record in terms of combined image resolution (0.3$"$) and sensitivity ($\sigma$=0.15mJy/beam) at low frequencies ($<327$MHz). We detected 16 objects at 154MHz, six of these also at 118MHz. Four weaker but resolved features are also found: a linear (50pc) filament and three other resolved objects, of which two show a clear shell structure. We do not detect any emission from either supernova 2008iz or from the radio transient source 43.78+59.3. The images obtained using remote baselines show diffuse emission, associated with the outflow in M82, with reduced brightness in the region of the edge-on star-forming disk.
  • July 8, 2014 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    This study aims to characterise the polarized foreground emission in the ELAIS-N1 field and to address its possible implications for the extraction of the cosmological 21-cm signal from the Low-Frequency Array - Epoch of Reionization (LOFAR-EoR) data. We use the high band antennas of LOFAR to image this region and RM-synthesis to unravel structures of polarized emission at high Galactic latitudes. The brightness temperature of the detected Galactic emission is on average 4 K in polarized intensity and covers the range from -10 to +13rad m^-2 in Faraday depth. The total polarized intensity and polarization angle show a wide range of morphological features. We have also used the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at 350 MHz to image the same region. The LOFAR and WSRT images show a similar complex morphology, at comparable brightness levels, but their spatial correlation is very low. The fractional polarization at 150 MHz, expressed as a percentage of the total intensity, amounts to 1.5%. There is no indication of diffuse emission in total intensity in the interferometric data, in line with results at higher frequencies. The wide frequency range, good angular resolution and good sensitivity make LOFAR an exquisite instrument for studying Galactic polarized emission at a resolution of 1-2 rad m^-2 in Faraday depth. The different polarised patterns observed at 150 MHz and 350 MHz are consistent with different source distributions along the line of sight wring in a variety of Faraday thin regions of emission. The presence of polarised foregrounds is a serious complication for Epoch of Reionization experiments. To avoid the leakage of polarized emission into total intensity, which can depend on frequency, we need to calibrate the instrumental polarization across the field of view to a small fraction of 1%.
  • Radio synchrotron polarization maps of the Galaxy can be used to infer the properties of interstellar turbulence in the diffuse warm ionized medium (WIM). In this paper, we investigate the spatial gradient of linearly polarized synchrotron emission ($|\nabla\textbf{P}|/|\textbf{P}|$) as a tracer of turbulence, the relationship of the gradient to the sonic Mach number of the WIM, and changes in morphology of the gradient as a function of Galactic position in the southern sky. We use data from the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey (S-PASS) to image the spatial gradient of the linearly polarized synchrotron emission ($|\nabla \textbf{P}|/|\textbf{P}|$) of the entire southern sky at $2.3$~GHz. The spatial gradient of linear polarization reveals rapid changes of the density and magnetic fluctuations in the WIM due to magnetic turbulence as a function of Galactic position; we make comparisons of these data to ideal MHD numerical simulations. In order to constrain the sonic Mach number ($M_{s}$), we apply a high order moments analysis to the observations and to the simulated diffuse, isothermal ISM with ideal magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence. We find that polarization gradient maps reveal elongated structures, which we associate with turbulence in the ISM. Our analysis corroborates the view of a turbulent WIM in a transonic regime $M_{s}\lesssim 2$. Filamentary structures with typical widths down to the angular resolution are seen and the observed morphologies match closely with numerical simulations and in some cases H$\alpha$ contours. The $|\nabla \textbf{P}|/|\textbf{P}|$ intensity is found to be approximately log-normal distributed. No systematic variations of the sonic Mach number are observed as a function of Galactic coordinates, which is consistent with turbulence in the WIM inferred by the analysis of H$\alpha$ data.