• The decay rate of neutrinoless double beta ($0\nu\beta\beta$) decay contains terms from heavy particle exchange, which lead to dimension-9 (d=9) six fermion operators at low energies. Limits on the coefficients of these operators have been derived previously neglecting the running of the operators between the high-scale, where they are generated, and the energy scale of double beta decay, where they are measured. Here we calculate the leading order QCD corrections to all possible d=9 operators contributing to the $0\nu\beta\beta$ amplitude and use RGE running to calculate 1-loop improved limits. Numerically, QCD running changes limits by factors of the order of or larger than typical uncertainties in nuclear matrix element calculations. For some specific cases, operator mixing in the running changes limits even by up to two orders of magnitude. Our results can be straightforwardly combined with new experimental limits or improved nuclear matrix element calculations to re-derive updated limits on all short-range contributions to $0\nu\beta\beta$ decay.
  • Dirac neutrino masses require two distinct neutral Weyl spinors per generation, with a special arrangement of masses and interactions with charged leptons. Once this arrangement is perturbed, lepton number is no longer conserved and neutrinos become Majorana particles. If these lepton number violating perturbations are small compared to the Dirac mass terms, neutrinos are quasi-Dirac particles. Alternatively, this scenario can be characterized by the existence of pairs of neutrinos with almost degenerate masses, and a lepton mixing matrix which has 12 angles and 12 phases. In this work we discuss the phenomenology of quasi-Dirac neutrino oscillations and derive limits on the relevant parameter space from various experiments. In one parameter perturbations of the Dirac limit, very stringent bounds can be derived on the mass splittings between the almost degenerate pairs of neutrinos. However, we also demonstrate that with suitable changes to the lepton mixing matrix, limits on such mass splittings are much weaker, or even completely absent. Finally, we consider the possibility that the mass splittings are too small to be measured and discuss bounds on the new, non-standard lepton mixing angles from current experiments for this case.
  • We study the phenomenology of d=7 1-loop neutrino mass models. All models in this particular class require the existence of several new $SU(2)_L$ multiplets, both scalar and fermionic, and thus predict a rich phenomenology at the LHC. The observed neutrino masses and mixings can easily be fitted in these models. Interestingly, despite the smallness of the observed neutrino masses, some particular lepton number violating (LNV) final states can arise with observable branching ratios. These LNV final states consists of leptons and gauge bosons with high multiplicities, such as 4l+4W, 6l+2W, etc. We study current constraints on these models from upper bounds on charged lepton flavour violating decays, existing lepton number conserving searches at the LHC and discuss possible future LNV searches.
  • The understanding of the outward radial transport of heat in magnetic confinement fusion devices is a priority for the development of economically viable fusion reactors. Here, we analyze the radial propagation of spontaneously generated electron temperature (T_e) fluctuations measured using the Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostic in Wendelstein 7-X, which disposes of 32 channels, covering a large part of the plasma minor radius. By applying a relatively new statistical analysis technique (the Transfer Entropy), the present work provides, for the first time, a view of the detailed mechanism of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas. It is shown that rational surfaces have a significant impact on radial heat transport and may in fact be essential in setting the global energy confinement. The reported observations provide support for various explanatory concepts suggested in literature: namely, critical gradients, non-locality, and self-organization.
  • We discuss the generation of small neutrino masses from d=7 1-loop diagrams. We first systematically analyze all possible d=7 1-loop topologies. There is a total of 48 topologies, but only 8 of these can lead to "genuine" d=7 neutrino masses. Here, we define genuine models to be models in which neither d=5 nor d=7 tree-level masses nor a d=5 1-loop mass appear, such that the d=7 1-loop is the leading order contribution to the neutrino masses. All genuine models can then be organized w.r.t. their particle content. We find there is only one diagram with no representation larger than triplet, while there are 22 diagrams with quadruplets. We briefly discuss three minimal example models of this kind.
  • The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, T. Abbott, F. B. Abdalla, S. Allam, A. Amara, J. Annis, R. Armstrong, D. Bacon, M. Banerji, A. H. Bauer, E. Baxter, M. R. Becker, A. Benoit-Lévy, R. A. Bernstein, G. M. Bernstein, E. Bertin, J. Blazek, C. Bonnett, S. L. Bridle, D. Brooks, C. Bruderer, E. Buckley-Geer, D. L. Burke, M. T. Busha, D. Capozzi, A. Carnero Rosell, M. Carrasco Kind, J. Carretero, F. J. Castander, C. Chang, J. Clampitt, M. Crocce, C. E. Cunha, C. B. D'Andrea, L. N. da Costa, R. Das, D. L. DePoy, S. Desai, H. T. Diehl, J. P. Dietrich, S. Dodelson, P. Doel, A. Drlica-Wagner, G. Efstathiou, T. F. Eifler, B. Erickson, J. Estrada, A. E. Evrard, A. Fausti Neto, E. Fernandez, D. A. Finley, B. Flaugher, P. Fosalba, O. Friedrich, J. Frieman, C. Gangkofner, J. Garcia-Bellido, E. Gaztanaga, D. W. Gerdes, D. Gruen, R. A. Gruendl, G. Gutierrez, W. Hartley, M. Hirsch, K. Honscheid, E. M. Huff, B. Jain, D. J. James, M. Jarvis, T. Kacprzak, S. Kent, D. Kirk, E. Krause, A. Kravtsov, K. Kuehn, N. Kuropatkin, J. Kwan, O. Lahav, B. Leistedt, T. S. Li, M. Lima, H. Lin, N. MacCrann, M. March, J. L. Marshall, P. Martini, R. G. McMahon, P. Melchior, C. J. Miller, R. Miquel, J. J. Mohr, E. Neilsen, R. C. Nichol, A. Nicola, B. Nord, R. Ogando, A. Palmese, H.V. Peiris, A. A. Plazas, A. Refregier, N. Roe, A. K. Romer, A. Roodman, B. Rowe, E. S. Rykoff, C. Sabiu, I. Sadeh, M. Sako, S. Samuroff, C. Sánchez, E. Sanchez, H. Seo, I. Sevilla-Noarbe, E. Sheldon, R. C. Smith, M. Soares-Santos, F. Sobreira, E. Suchyta, M. E. C. Swanson, G. Tarle, J. Thaler, D. Thomas, M. A. Troxel, V. Vikram, A. R. Walker, R. H. Wechsler, J. Weller, Y. Zhang, J. Zuntz
    May 3, 2017 astro-ph.CO
    We present the first constraints on cosmology from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), using weak lensing measurements from the preliminary Science Verification (SV) data. We use 139 square degrees of SV data, which is less than 3\% of the full DES survey area. Using cosmic shear 2-point measurements over three redshift bins we find $\sigma_8 (\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.81 \pm 0.06$ (68\% confidence), after marginalising over 7 systematics parameters and 3 other cosmological parameters. We examine the robustness of our results to the choice of data vector and systematics assumed, and find them to be stable. About $20$\% of our error bar comes from marginalising over shear and photometric redshift calibration uncertainties. The current state-of-the-art cosmic shear measurements from CFHTLenS are mildly discrepant with the cosmological constraints from Planck CMB data; our results are consistent with both datasets. Our uncertainties are $\sim$30\% larger than those from CFHTLenS when we carry out a comparable analysis of the two datasets, which we attribute largely to the lower number density of our shear catalogue. We investigate constraints on dark energy and find that, with this small fraction of the full survey, the DES SV constraints make negligible impact on the Planck constraints. The moderate disagreement between the CFHTLenS and Planck values of $\sigma_8 (\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3)^{0.5}$ is present regardless of the value of $w$.
  • Lepton number violation is searched for at the LHC using same-sign leptons plus jets. The standard lore is that the ratio of same-sign lepton to opposite-sign lepton events, $R_{ll}$, is equal to $R_{ll}=1$ ($R_{ll}=0$) for Majorana (Dirac) neutrinos. We argue that for "quasi-Dirac" neutrinos, $R_{ll}$ can have any value between 0 and 1, the precise value being controlled by the mass splitting versus the width of the quasi-Dirac resonances. A measurement of $R_{ll}\neq 0,1$ would then contain valuable information about the origin of neutrino masses. We consider as an example the inverse seesaw mechanism in a left-right symmetric scenario, which is phenomenologically particularly interesting since all the heavy states in the high energy completion of the model could be within experimental reach. A prediction of this scenario is a correlation between the values of $R_{ll}$ and the ratio between the rates for heavy neutrino decays into standard model gauge bosons, and into three body final states $ljj$ mediated by off-shell $W_R$ exchange.
  • The decay rate of neutrinoless double beta decay could be dominated by short-range diagrams involving heavy scalar particles ("topology-II" diagrams). Examples are diagrams with diquarks, leptoquarks or charged scalars. Here, we compare the discovery potential for lepton number violating signals at the LHC with constraints from dijet and leptoquark searches and the sensitivity of double beta decay experiments, using three example models. We note that already with 20/fb the LHC will test interesting parts of the parameter space of these models, not excluded by current limits on double beta decay.
  • We present weak lensing shear catalogues for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogues of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies respectively. We detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. We also discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogues for the full 5-year DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.
  • We discuss the systematic decomposition of all dimension-7 (d=7) lepton number violating operators. These d=7 operators produce momentum enhanced contributions to the long-range part of the neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude and thus are severely constrained by existing half-live limits. In our list of possible models one can find contributions to the long-range amplitude discussed previously in the literature, such as the left-right symmetric model or scalar leptoquarks, as well as some new models not considered before. The d=7 operators generate Majorana neutrino mass terms either at tree-level, 1-loop or 2-loop level. We systematically compare constraints derived from the mass mechanism to those derived from the long-range double beta decay amplitude and classify our list of models accordingly. We also study one particular example decomposition, which produces neutrino masses at 2-loop level, can fit oscillation data and yields a large contribution to the long-range double beta decay amplitude, in some detail.
  • We use LHC dijet data to derive constraints on neutrinoless double beta decay. Upper limits on cross sections for the production of "exotic" resonances, such as a right-handed W boson or a diquark, can be converted into lower limits on the double beta decay half-life for fixed choices of other parameters. Constraints derived from run-I data are already surprisingly strong and complementary to results from searches using same-sign dileptons plus jets. For the case of the left-right symmetric model, in case no new resonance is found in future runs of the LHC and assuming $g_L=g_R$, we estimate a lower limit on the double beta decay half-live larger than $10^{27}$ ys can be derived from future dijet data, except in the window of relatively light right-handed neutrino masses in the range $0.5$ MeV to $50$ GeV. Part of this mass window will be tested in the upcoming SHiP experiment. We also discuss current and future limits on possible scalar diquark contributions to double beta decay that can be derived from dijet data.
  • Neutrinoless double beta decay allows to constrain lepton number violating extensions of the standard model. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, the mass mechanism will always contribute to the decay rate, however, it is not a priori guaranteed to be the dominant contribution in all models. Here, we discuss whether the mass mechanism dominates or not from the theory point of view. We classify all possible (scalar-mediated) short-range contributions to the decay rate according to the loop level, at which the corresponding models will generate Majorana neutrino masses, and discuss the expected relative size of the different contributions to the decay rate in each class. Our discussion is general for models based on the SM group but does not cover models with an extended gauge. We also work out the phenomenology of one concrete 2-loop model in which both, mass mechanism and short-range diagram, might lead to competitive contributions, in some detail.
  • We systematically analyze the $d=5$ Weinberg operator at 2-loop order. Using a diagrammatic approach, we identify two different interesting categories of neutrino mass models: (i) Genuine 2-loop models for which both, tree-level and 1-loop contributions, are guaranteed to be absent. And (ii) finite 2-loop diagrams, which correspond to the 1-loop generation of some particular vertex appearing in a given 1-loop neutrino mass model, thus being effectively 2-loop. From the large list of all possible 2-loop diagrams, the vast majority are infinite corrections to lower order neutrino mass models and only a moderately small number of diagrams fall into these two interesting classes. Moreover, all diagrams in class (i) are just variations of three basic diagrams, with examples discussed in the literature before. Similarly, we also show that class (ii) diagrams consists of only variations of these three plus two more basic diagrams. Finally, we show how our results can be consistently and readily used in order to construct two-loop neutrino mass models.
  • Transient short-period <100s oscillations have been found in the X-ray light curves of three novae during their SSS phase and in one persistent SSS. We pursue an observational approach to determine possible driving mechanisms and relations to fundamental system parameters such as the white dwarf mass. We performed a systematic search for short-period oscillations in all available XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray light curves of persistent SSS and novae during their SSS phase. To study time evolution, we divided each light curve into short time segments and computed power spectra. We then constructed dynamic power spectra from which we identified transient periodic signals even when only present for a short time. From all time segments of each system, we computed fractions of time when periodic signals were detected. In addition to the previously known systems with short-period oscillations, RS Oph (35s), KT Eri (35s), V339 Del (54s), and Cal 83 (67s), we found one additional system, LMC 2009a (33s), and also confirm the 35s period from Chandra data of KT Eri. The amplitudes of oscillations are of order <15% of the respective count rates and vary without any clear dependence on the X-ray count rate. The fractions of the time when the respective periods were detected at 2-sigma significance (duty cycle) are 11.3%, 38.8%, 16.9%, 49.2%, and 18.7% for LMC 2009a, RS Oph, KT Eri, V339 Del, and Cal 83, respectively. The respective highest duty cycles found in a single observation are 38.1%, 74.5%, 61.4%, 67.8%, and 61.8%.
  • We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modeling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modeling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. In addition, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1 degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.
  • The minimal seesaw extension of the Standard SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) Model requires two electroweak singlet fermions in order to accommodate the neutrino oscillation parameters at tree level. Here we consider a next to minimal extension where light neutrino masses are generated radiatively by two electroweak fermions: one singlet and one triplet under SU(2). These should be odd under a parity symmetry and their mixing gives rise to a stable weakly interactive massive particle (WIMP) dark matter candidate. For mass in the GeV-TeV range, it reproduces the correct relic density, and provides an observable signal in nuclear recoil direct detection experiments. The fermion triplet component of the dark matter has gauge interactions, making it also detectable at present and near future collider experiments.
  • We compare the discovery potential of the LHC for lepton number violating (LNV) signals with the sensitivity of current and future double beta decay experiments, assuming 0\nu\beta\beta decay is dominated by heavy particle exchange. We consider charged scalar, leptoquark and diquark mechanisms of 0\nu\beta\beta-decay, covering the 0\nu\beta\beta-decay operators with both, the smallest and largest, possible rates. We demonstrate, if 0\nu\beta\beta-decay were found with a half-life below $10^{26}-10^{27}$ ys a positive signal should show up at the LHC, except for some particular cases of the leptoquark mechanism, and vice versa, if the LHC does not find any hints for LNV, a "short-range" explanation for a finite 0\nu\beta\beta-decay half-life will be ruled out in most cases. We argue, if a positive LNV signal were found at the LHC, it is possible to identify the dominant contribution to 0\nu\beta\beta. Two different kinds of observables which could provide such "model discriminating" power are discussed: Different invariant mass peaks and the charge asymmetry.
  • Lepton number violation (LNV) mediated by short range operators can manifest itself in both neutrinoless double beta decay and in processes with same sign dilepton final states at the LHC. We derive limits from existing LHC data at $\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV and compare the discovery potential of the forthcoming $\sqrt{s}=14$ TeV phase of the LHC with the sensitivity of current and future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments, assuming the short-range part of the decay amplitude dominates. We focus on the first of two possible topologies triggered by one fermion and two bosons in the intermediate state. In all cases, except for the pure leptoquark mechanism, the LHC will be more sensitive than neutrinoless double beta decay in the future. In addition, we propose to search for a charge asymmetry in the final state leptons and to use different invariant mass peaks as a possibility to discriminate the various possible mechanisms for LNV signals at the LHC.
  • In this paper we present results from the weak lensing shape measurement GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2010 (GREAT10) Galaxy Challenge. This marks an order of magnitude step change in the level of scrutiny employed in weak lensing shape measurement analysis. We provide descriptions of each method tested and include 10 evaluation metrics over 24 simulation branches. GREAT10 was the first shape measurement challenge to include variable fields; both the shear field and the Point Spread Function (PSF) vary across the images in a realistic manner. The variable fields enable a variety of metrics that are inaccessible to constant shear simulations including a direct measure of the impact of shape measurement inaccuracies, and the impact of PSF size and ellipticity, on the shear power spectrum. To assess the impact of shape measurement bias for cosmic shear we present a general pseudo-Cl formalism, that propagates spatially varying systematics in cosmic shear through to power spectrum estimates. We also show how one-point estimators of bias can be extracted from variable shear simulations. The GREAT10 Galaxy Challenge received 95 submissions and saw a factor of 3 improvement in the accuracy achieved by shape measurement methods. The best methods achieve sub-percent average biases. We find a strong dependence in accuracy as a function of signal-to-noise, and indications of a weak dependence on galaxy type and size. Some requirements for the most ambitious cosmic shear experiments are met above a signal-to-noise ratio of 20. These results have the caveat that the simulated PSF was a ground-based PSF. Our results are a snapshot of the accuracy of current shape measurement methods and are a benchmark upon which improvement can continue. This provides a foundation for a better understanding of the strengths and limitations of shape measurement methods.
  • We construct lists of supersymmetric models with extended gauge groups at intermediate steps, all of which are based on SO(10) unification. We consider three different kinds of setups: (i) The model has exactly one additional intermediate scale with a left-right (LR) symmetric group; (ii) SO(10) is broken to the LR group via an intermediate Pati-Salam (PS) scale; and (iii) the LR group is broken into $SU(3)_{c} \times SU(2)_{L} \times U(1)_{R} \times U(1)_{B-L}$, before breaking to the SM group. We use sets of conditions, which we call the "sliding mechanism", which yield unification with the extended gauge group(s) allowed at arbitrary intermediate energy scales. All models thus can have new gauge bosons within the reach of the LHC, in principle. We apply additional conditions, such as perturbative unification, renormalizability and anomaly cancellation and find that, despite these requirements, for the ansatz (i) with only one additional scale still around 50 different variants exist that can have an LR symmetry below 10 TeV. For the more complicated schemes (ii) and (iii) literally thousands of possible variants exist, and for scheme (ii) we have also found variants with very low PS scales. We also discuss possible experimental tests of the models from measurements of SUSY masses. Assuming mSugra boundary conditions we calculate certain combinations of soft terms, called "invariants", for the different classes of models. Values for all the invariants can be classified into a small number of sets, which contain information about the class of models and, in principle, the scale of beyond-MSSM physics, even in case the extended gauge group is broken at an energy beyond the reach of the LHC.
  • Motivated by the ATLAS and CMS discovery of a Higgs-like boson with a mass around 125 GeV, and by the need of explaining neutrino masses, we analyse the three canonical SUSY versions of the seesaw mechanism (type I, II and III) with CMSSM boundary conditions. In type II and III cases, SUSY particles are lighter than in the CMSSM (or the constrained type I seesaw), for the same set of input parameters at the universality scale. Thus, to explain $m_{h^0} \simeq 125 GeV$ at low energies, one is forced into regions of parameter space with very large values of $m_0$, $M_{1/2}$ or $A_0$. We compare the squark and gluino masses allowed by the ATLAS and CMS ranges for $m_{h^0}$ (extracted from the 2011-2012 data), and discuss the possibility of distinguishing seesaw models in view of future results on SUSY searches. In particular, we briefly comment on the discovery potential of LHC upgrades, for squark/gluino mass ranges required by present Higgs mass constraints. A discrimination between different seesaw models cannot rely on the Higgs mass data alone, therefore we also take into account the MEG upper limit on BR$(\mu \to e \gamma)$ and show that, in some cases, this may help to restrict the SUSY parameter space, as well as to set complementary limits on the seesaw scale.
  • These are the proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Flavor Symmetries and Consequences in Accelerators and Cosmology, held 30 June 2012 - 4 July 2012, Dortmund, Germany.
  • Lepton flavor violation (LFV) has been observed in neutrino oscillations. For charged lepton FV decays only upper limits are known, but sizable branching ratios are expected in many neutrino mass models. High scale models, such as the classical supersymmetric seesaw, usually predict that decays $l_i \to 3 l_j$ are roughly a factor $\alpha$ maller than the corresponding decays $l_i \to l_j \gamma$. Here we demonstrate that the $Z^0$-penguin diagram can give an enhancement for decays $l_i \to 3 l_j$ in many extensions of the MSSM. We first discuss why the $Z^0$-penguin is not dominant in the MSSM with seesaw and show that much larger contributions from the $Z^0$-penguin are expected in general. We then demonstrate the effect numerically in two example models, namely, the supersymmetric inverse seesaw and R-parity violating supersymmetry.
  • The SUSY Les Houches Accord (SLHA) 2 extended the first SLHA to include various generalisations of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) as well as its simplest next-to-minimal version. Here, we propose further extensions to it, to include the most general and well-established see-saw descriptions (types I/II/III, inverse, and linear) in both an effective and a simple gauged extension of the MSSM framework. In addition, we generalise the PDG numbering scheme to reflect the properties of the particles.
  • Supersymmetric models with bilinear R-parity violation (BRPV) can account for the observed neutrino masses and mixing parameters indicated by neutrino oscillation data. We consider minimal supergravity versions of BRPV where the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is a neutralino. This is unstable, with a large enough decay length to be detected at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We analyse the LHC potential to determine the LSP properties, such as mass, lifetime and branching ratios, and discuss their relation to neutrino properties.