• We made near infrared multicolor imaging observations of a disk around Herbig Be star HD100546 using Gemini/NICI. K (2.2\,$\mu$m), H$_2$O ice (3.06\,$\mu$m), and L'(3.8\,$\mu$m) disk images were obtained and we found the 3.1\,$\mu$m absorption feature in the scattered light spectrum, likely due to water ice grains at the disk surface. We compared the observed depth of the ice absorption feature with the disk model based on \cite{Oka2012} including water ice photodesorption effect by stellar UV photons. The observed absorption depth can be explained by the both disk models with/without photodesorption effect within the measurement accuracy, but slightly favors the model with photodesorption effects, implying that the UV photons play an important role on the survival/destruction of ice grains at the Herbig Ae/Be disk surface. Further improvement on the accuracy of the observations of the water ice absorption depth is needed to constrain the disk models.
  • In this paper, we extend the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux~\cite{hkkm2004,hkkms2006,hkkm2011} to the sites in polar and tropical regions. In our earliest full 3D-calculation~\cite{hkkm2004}, we used DPMJET-III~\cite{dpm} for the hadronic interaction model above 5~GeV, and NUCRIN~\cite{nucrin} below 5~GeV. We modified DPMJET-III as in Ref.~\cite{hkkms2006} to reproduce the experimental muon spectra better, mainly using the data observed by BESS group~\cite{BESSTeVpHemu}. In a recent work~\cite{hkkm2011}, we introduced JAM interaction model for the low energy hadronic interactions. JAM is a nuclear interaction model developed with PHITS (Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System)~\cite{phits}. In Ref.~\cite{hkkm2011}, we could reproduce the observed muon flux at the low energies at balloon altitude with DPMJET-III above 32 GeV and JAM below that better than the combination of DPMJET-III above 5~GeV and NUCRIN below that. Besides the interaction model, we have also improved the calculation scheme according to the increase of available computational power, such as the "virtual detector correction" introduced in Ref.~\cite{hkkms2006} and the optimization of it in Ref.~\cite{hkkm2011}. The statistics of the Monte Carlo simulation is also improved at every step of the work.
  • We imaged circumstellar disks around 22 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 25 \mu m using Subaru/COMICS and Gemini/T-ReCS. Our sample consists of equal numbers of objects belonging to the two categories defined by Meeus et al. (2001); 11 group I (flaring disk) and II (at disk) sources. We find that group I sources tend to show more extended emission than group II sources. Previous studies have shown that the continuous disk is hard to be resolved with 8 meter class telescopes in Q-band due to the strong emission from the unresolved innermost region of the disk. It indicates that the resolved Q-band sources require a hole or gap in the disk material distribution to suppress the contribution from the innermost region of the disk. As many group I sources are resolved at 25 \mu m, we suggest that many, not all, group I Herbig Ae/Be disks have a hole or gap and are (pre-)transitional disks. On the other hand, the unresolved nature of many group II sources at 25 \mu m supports that group II disks have continuous at disk geometry. It has been inferred that group I disks may evolve into group II through settling of dust grains to the mid-plane of the proto-planetary disk. However, considering growing evidence for the presence of a hole or gaps in the disk of group I sources, such an evolutionary scenario is unlikely. The difference between groups I and II may reflect different evolutionary pathways of protoplanetary disks.
  • *Context The evolution of young massive protoplanetary disks toward planetary systems is expected to include the formation of gaps and the depletion of dust and gas. *Aims A special group of flaring disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars do not show prominent silicate emission features. We focus our attention on four key Herbig Ae/Be stars to understand the structural properties responsible for the absence of silicate feature emission. *Methods We investigate Q- and N-band images taken with Subaru/COMICS, Gemini South/T-ReCS and VLT/VISIR. Our radiative transfer modeling solutions require a separation of inner- and outer- disks by a large gap. From this we characterize the radial density structure of dust and PAHs in the disk. *Results The inner edge of the outer disk has a high surface brightness and a typical temperature between ~100-150 K and therefore dominates the emission in the Q-band. We derive radii of the inner edge of the outer disk of 34, 23, 30 and 63 AU for HD97048, HD169142, HD135344B and Oph IRS 48 respectively. For HD97048 this is the first detection of a disk gap. The continuum emission in the N-band is not due to emission in the wings of PAHs. This continuum emission can be due to VSGs or to thermal emission from the inner disk. We find that PAH emission is not always dominated by PAHs on the surface of the outer disk. *Conclusions. The absence of silicate emission features is due to the presence of large gaps in the critical temperature regime. Many, if not all Herbig disks with Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) classification `group I' are disks with large gaps and can be characterized as (pre-) transitional. An evolutionary path from the observed group I to the observed group II sources seems no longer likely. Instead, both might derive from a common ancestor.
  • We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes for the neutrino experiments proposed at INO, South Pole and Pyh\"asalmi. Neutrino fluxes have been obtained using ATMNC, a simulation code for cosmic ray in the atmosphere. Even using the same primary flux model and the interaction model, the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes are different for the different sites due to the geomagnetic field. The prediction of these fluxes in the present paper would be quite useful in the experimental analysis.
  • We present high resolution H-band polarized intensity (PI; FWHM = 0."1: 14 AU) and L'-band imaging data (FWHM = 0."11: 15 AU) of the circumstellar disk around the weak-lined T Tauri star PDS 70 in Centaurus at a radial distance of 28 AU (0."2) up to 210 AU (1."5). In both images, a giant inner gap is clearly resolved for the first time, and the radius of the gap is ~70 AU. Our data show that the geometric center of the disk shifts by ~6 AU toward the minor axis. We confirm that the brown dwarf companion candidate to the north of PDS 70 is a background star based on its proper motion. As a result of SED fitting by Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling, we infer the existence of an optically thick inner disk at a few AU. Combining our observations and modeling, we classify the disk of PDS 70 as a pre-transitional disk. Furthermore, based on the analysis of L'-band imaging data, we put an upper limit mass of companions at ~30 to ~50MJ within the gap. Taking account of the presence of the large and sharp gap, we suggest that the gap could be formed by dynamical interactions of sub-stellar companions or multiple unseen giant planets in the gap.
  • We present H-band polarimetric imagery of UX Tau A taken with HiCIAO/AO188 on the Subaru Telescope. UX Tau A has been classified as a pre-transitional disk object, with a gap structure separating its inner and outer disks. Our imagery taken with the 0.15 (21 AU) radius coronagraphic mask has revealed a strongly polarized circumstellar disk surrounding UX Tau A which extends to 120 AU, at a spatial resolution of 0.1 (14 AU). It is inclined by 46 \pm 2 degree as the west side is nearest. Although SED modeling and sub-millimeter imagery suggested the presence of a gap in the disk, with the inner edge of the outer disk estimated to be located at 25 - 30 AU, we detect no evidence of a gap at the limit of our inner working angle (23 AU) at the near-infrared wavelength. We attribute the observed strong polarization (up to 66 %) to light scattering by dust grains in the disk. However, neither polarization models of the circumstellar disk based on Rayleigh scattering nor Mie scattering approximations were consistent with the observed azimuthal profile of the polarization degrees of the disk. Instead, a geometric optics model of the disk with nonspherical grains with the radii of 30 micron meter is consistent with the observed profile. We suggest that the dust grains have experienced frequent collisional coagulations and have grown in the circumstellar disk of UX Tau A.
  • The disk around the Herbig Ae star HD\,169142 was imaged and resolved at 18.8 and 24.5\,$\mu$m using Subaru/COMICS. We interpret the observations using a 2D radiative transfer model and find evidence for the presence of a large gap. The MIR images trace dust that emits at the onset of the strong rise in the spectral energy distribution (SED) at 20\,$\mu$m, therefore are very sensitive to the location and characteristics of the inner wall of the outer disk and its dust. We determine the location of the wall to be 23$^{+3}_{-5}$\,AU from the star. An extra component of hot dust must exist close to the star. We find that a hydrostatic optically thick inner disk does not produce enough flux in the NIR and an optically thin geometrically thick component is our solution to fit the SED. Considering the recent findings of gaps and holes in a number of Herbig Ae/Be group I disks, we suggest that such disk structures may be common in group I sources. Classification as group I should be considered a support for classification as a transitional disk, though improved imaging surveys are needed to support this speculation.
  • We present high-resolution, H-band, imaging observations, collected with Subaru/HiCIAO, of the scattered light from the transitional disk around SAO 206462 (HD 135344B). Although previous sub-mm imagery suggested the existence of the dust-depleted cavity at r~46AU, our observations reveal the presence of scattered light components as close as 0.2" (~28AU) from the star. Moreover, we have discovered two small-scale spiral structures lying within 0.5" (~70AU). We present models for the spiral structures using the spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h~0.1, which is consistent with previous sub-mm observations. This model can potentially give estimates of the temperature and rotation profiles of the disk based on dynamical processes, independently from sub-mm observations. It also predicts the evolution of the spiral structures, which can be observable on timescales of 10-20 years, providing conclusive tests of the model. While we cannot uniquely identify the origin of these spirals, planets embedded in the disk may be capable of exciting the observed morphology. Assuming that this is the case, we can make predictions on the locations and, possibly, the masses of the unseen planets. Such planets may be detected by future multi-wavelengths observations.
  • Transitional circumstellar disks around young stellar objects have a distinctive infrared deficit around 10 microns in their Spectral Energy Distributions (SED), recently measured by the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), suggesting dust depletion in the inner regions. These disks have been confirmed to have giant central cavities by imaging of the submillimeter (sub-mm) continuum emission using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). However, the polarized near-infrared scattered light images for most objects in a systematic IRS/SMA cross sample, obtained by HiCIAO on the Subaru telescope, show no evidence for the cavity, in clear contrast with SMA and Spitzer observations. Radiative transfer modeling indicates that many of these scattered light images are consistent with a smooth spatial distribution for micron-sized grains, with little discontinuity in the surface density of the micron-sized grains at the cavity edge. Here we present a generic disk model that can simultaneously account for the general features in IRS, SMA, and Subaru observations. Particularly, the scattered light images for this model are computed, which agree with the general trend seen in Subaru data. Decoupling between the spatial distributions of the micron-sized dust and mm-sized dust inside the cavity is suggested by the model, which, if confirmed, necessitates a mechanism, such as dust filtration, for differentiating the small and big dust in the cavity clearing process. Our model also suggests an inwardly increasing gas-to-dust-ratio in the inner disk, and different spatial distributions for the small dust inside and outside the cavity, echoing the predictions in grain coagulation and growth models.
  • We present a study of the radial distribution of dust species in young brown dwarf disks. Our work is based on a compositional analysis of the 10 and 20 micron silicate emission features for brown dwarfs in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. A fundamental finding of our work is that brown dwarfs exhibit stronger signs of dust processing in the cold component of the disk, compared to the higher mass T Tauri stars in Taurus. For nearly all of our targets, we find a flat disk structure, which is consistent with the stronger signs of dust processing observed in these disks. For the case of one brown dwarf, 2M04230607, we find the forsterite mass fraction to be a factor of ~3 higher in the outer disk compared to the inner disk region. Simple large-scale radial mixing cannot account for this gradient in the dust chemical composition, and some local crystalline formation mechanism may be effective in this disk. The relatively high abundance of crystalline silicates in the outer cold regions of brown dwarf disks provides an interesting analogy to comets. In this context, we have discussed the applicability of the various mechanisms that have been proposed for comets on the formation and the outward transport of high-temperature material. We also present Chandra X-ray observations for two Taurus brown dwarfs, 2M04414825 and CFHT-BD-Tau 9. We find 2M04414825, which has a ~12% crystalline mass fraction, to be more than an order of magnitude brighter in X-ray than CFHT-BD-Tau 9, which has a ~35% crystalline mass fraction. Combining with previous X-ray data, we find the inner disk crystalline mass fractions to be anti-correlated with the X-ray strength.
  • We present the SPICA Coronagraphic Instrument (SCI), which has been designed for a concentrated study of extra-solar planets (exoplanets). SPICA mission provides us with a unique opportunity to make high contrast observations because of its large telescope aperture, the simple pupil shape, and the capability for making infrared observations from space. The primary objectives for the SCI are the direct coronagraphic detection and spectroscopy of Jovian exoplanets in infrared, while the monitoring of transiting planets is another important target. The specification and an overview of the design of the instrument are shown. In the SCI, coronagraphic and non-coronagraphic modes are applicable for both an imaging and a spectroscopy. The core wavelength range and the goal contrast of the coronagraphic mode are 3.5--27$\mu$m, and 10$^{-6}$, respectively. Two complemental designs of binary shaped pupil mask coronagraph are presented. The SCI has capability of simultaneous observations of one target using two channels, a short channel with an InSb detector and a long wavelength channel with a Si:As detector. We also give a report on the current progress in the development of key technologies for the SCI.
  • We report high-resolution 1.6 $\micron$ polarized intensity ($PI$) images of the circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur at a radial distance of 22 AU ($0."15$) up to 554 AU (3.$"$85), which have been obtained by the high-contrast instrument HiCIAO with the dual-beam polarimetry. We revealed complicated and asymmetrical structures in the inner part ($\lesssim$140 AU) of the disk, while confirming the previously reported outer ($r$ $\gtrsim$200 AU) spiral structure. We have imaged a double ring structure at $\sim$40 and $\sim$100 AU and a ring-like gap between the two. We found a significant discrepancy of inclination angles between two rings, which may indicate that the disk of AB Aur is warped. Furthermore, we found seven dips (the typical size is $\sim$45 AU or less) within two rings as well as three prominent $PI$ peaks at $\sim$40 AU. The observed structures, including a bumpy double ring, a ring-like gap, and a warped disk in the innermost regions, provide essential information for understanding the formation mechanism of recently detected wide-orbit ($r$ $>$20 AU) planets.
  • The recent findings of gas giant planets around young A-type stars suggest that disks surrounding Herbig Ae/Be stars will develop planetary systems. An interesting case is HD142527, for which previous observations revealed a complex circumstellar environment and an unusually high ratio of infrared to stellar luminosity. Its properties differ considerably from other Herbig Ae/Be stars. This suggests that the disk surrounding HD142527 is in an uncommon evolutionary stage. We aim for a better understanding of the geometry and evolutionary status of the circumstellar material around the Herbig Ae/Be star HD142527. We map the composition and spatial distribution of the dust around HD142527. We analyze SEST and ATCA millimeter data, VISIR N and Q-band imaging and spectroscopy. We gather additional relevant data from the literature. We use the radiative transfer code MCMax to construct a model of the geometry and density structure of the circumstellar matter, which fits all of the observables satisfactorily. We find that the disk of HD142527 has three geometrically distinct components separated by a disk gap running from 30 to 130 AU. There is a geometrically flat inner disk running from 0.3 AU up to 30 AU; an optically thin halo-like component of dust in the inner disk regions; and a massive self-shadowed outer disk running from 130 AU up to 200 AU. We derived a total dust mass in small grains of 10^-3 M0 and a vertical height of the inner wall of the outer disk of h = 60 AU. ....
  • The disk around AB Aur was imaged and resolved at 24.6\,$\mu$m using the Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer on the 8.2m Subaru Telescope. The gaussian full-width at half-maximum of the source size is estimated to be 90 $\pm$ 6 AU, indicating that the disk extends further out at 24.6\,$\mu$m than at shorter wavelengths. In order to interpret the extended 24.6\,$\mu$m image, we consider a disk with a reduced surface density within a boundary radius $R_c$, which is motivated by radio observations that suggest a reduced inner region within about 100 AU from the star. Introducing the surface density reduction factor $f_c$ for the inner disk, we determine that the best match with the observed radial intensity profile at 24.6\,$\mu$m is achieved with $R_c$=88 AU and $f_c$=0.01. We suggest that the extended emission at 24.6\,$\mu$m is due to the enhanced emission from a wall-like structure at the boundary radius (the inner edge of the outer disk), which is caused by a jump in the surface density at $R_c$. Such reduced inner disk and geometrically thick outer disk structure can also explain the more point-like nature at shorter wavelengths. We also note that this disk geometry is qualitatively similar to a pre-transitional disk, suggesting that the AB Aur disk is in a pre-transitional disk phase.
  • Blazars have been regarded as one of the most powerful sources of the highest energy cosmic rays and also their byproducts, neutrinos. Provided that a magnetized filamentary system is established in a blazar jet as well, we could apply the mechanism of multi-stage diffusive shock acceleration to a feasible TeV emitter, Mrk 501 to evaluate the achievable maximum energy of protons. Taking conceivable energy restriction into account systematically, it seems adequate to say that EeV-protons are produced at this site by our present model. We also estimate neutrino fluxes generated by these accelerated protons and discuss the detectability based on an updated kilometre-scale telescope such as IceCube.
  • We made mid-infrared observations of the 10Msun Herbig Be star HD200775 with the Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer (COMICS) on the 8.2m Subaru Telescope. We discovered diffuse emission of an elliptical shape extended in the north-south direction inabout 1000AU radius around unresolved excess emission. The diffuse emission is perpendicular to the cavity wall formed by the past outflow activity and is parallel to the projected major axis of the central close binary orbit. The centers of the ellipse contours of the diffuse emission are shifted from the stellar position and the amount of the shift increases as the contour brightness level decreases. The diffuse emission is well explained in all of geometry, size, and configuration by an inclined flared disk where only its surface emits the mid-infrared photons. Our results give the first well-resolved infrared disk images around a massive star and strongly support that HD200775 is formed through the disk accretion. The disk survives the main accretion phase and shows a structure similar to that around lower-mass stars with 'disk atmosphere'. At the same time, the disk also shows properties characteristic to massive stars such as photoevaporation traced by the 3.4mm free-free emission and unusual silicate emission with a peak at 9.2micron, which is shorter than that of many astronomical objects. It provides a good place to compare the disk properties between massive and lower-mass stars.
  • Massive young stellar objects (MYSO) are surrounded by massive dusty envelopes. Our aim is to establish their density structure on scales of ~1000 AU, i.e. a factor 10 increase in angular resolution compared to similar studies performed in the (sub)mm. We have obtained diffraction-limited (0.6") 24.5 micron images of 14 well-known massive star formation regions with Subaru/COMICS. The images reveal the presence of discrete MYSO sources which are resolved on arcsecond scales. For many sources, radiative transfer models are capable of satisfactorily reproducing the observations. They are described by density powerlaw distributions (n(r) ~ r^(-p)) with p = 1.0 +/-0.25. Such distributions are shallower than those found on larger scales probed with single-dish (sub)mm studies. Other sources have density laws that are shallower/steeper than p = 1.0 and there is evidence that these MYSOs are viewed near edge-on or near face-on, respectively. The images also reveal a diffuse component tracing somewhat larger scale structures, particularly visible in the regions S140, AFGL 2136, IRAS 20126+4104, Mon R2, and Cep A. We thus find a flattening of the MYSO envelope density law going from ~10 000 AU down to scales of ~1000 AU. We propose that this may be evidence of rotational support of the envelope (abridged).
  • We present diffraction limited (0.6") 24.5micron Subaru/COMICS images of the red supergiant mu Cep. We report the detection of a circumstellar nebula, that was not detected at shorter wavelengths. It extends to a radius of at least 6" in the thermal infrared. On these angular scales, the nebula is roughly spherical, in contrast, it displays a pronounced asymmetric morphology closer in. We simultaneously model the azimuthally averaged intensity profile of the nebula and the observed spectral energy distribution using spherical dust radiative transfer models. The models indicate a constant mass-loss process over the past 1000 years, for mass-loss rates a few times 10^(-7) Msun/yr. This work supports the idea that at least part of the asymmetries in shells of evolved massive stars and supernovae may be due to the mass-loss process in the red supergiant phase.
  • Using the ``modified DPMJET-III'' model explained in the previous paper, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux. The calculation scheme is almost the same as HKKM04 \cite{HKKM2004}, but the usage of the ``virtual detector'' is improved to reduce the error due to it. Then we study the uncertainty of the calculated atmospheric neutrino flux summarizing the uncertainties of individual components of the simulation. The uncertainty of $K$-production in the interaction model is estimated by modifying FLUKA'97 and Fritiof 7.02 so that they also reproduce the atmospheric muon flux data correctly, and the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux with those modified interaction models. The uncertainties of the flux ratio and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrino flux are also studied.
  • We have studied the hadronic interaction for the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux by summarizing the accurately measured atmospheric muon flux data and comparing with simulations. We find the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes respond to errors in the $\pi$-production of the hadronic interaction similarly, and compare the atmospheric muon flux calculated using the HKKM04 code with experimental measurements. The $\mu^++\mu^-$ data show good agreement in the 1$\sim$30 GeV/c range, but a large disagreement above 30 GeV/c. The the $\mu^+/\mu^-$ ratio shows sizable differences at lower and higher momenta for opposite directions. As the disagreements are considered to be due to assumptions in the hadronic interaction model, we try to improve it phenomenologically based on the quark parton model. The improved interaction model reproduces the observed muon flux data well. The calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux will be reported in the following paper
  • We report centimeter continuum observations with the VLA and the VLBA as well as mid-infrared observations with COMICS/SUBARU toward the components of the YLW 15 very young binary system, VLA 1 and VLA 2. The centimeter emission of the two components traces partially thick free-free emission, likely due to collimated, ionized winds. VLA 1 is an embedded protostar, undetected in the near-IR, and possibly in the Class 0 to Class I transition and powering a Herbig-Haro outflow. Its mid-IR emission appears slightly resolved with a diameter of ~16 AU, possibly tracing circumstellar material from both the envelope and the disk. VLA 2 is a typical Class I object, unresolved in the mid-IR, and is the responsible of the strong X-ray emission associated with YLW 15. The expected centimeter ''peri-stellar'' emission associated with the X-ray emission is not detected with the VLBA at 6 cm likely due to the high optical depth of the free-free emission. Strikingly, the near to mid-IR properties of YLW 15 suggest that VLA 1 is a more embedded YSO, or alternatively, less luminous than VLA 2, whereas orbital proper motions of this binary system indicate that VLA 1 is more massive than VLA 2. This result is apparently against the expected evolutionary scenario, where one expects that the more massive YSO in a binary system is the more evolved and luminous YSO. Finally, the nearby source YLW 16A is detected with the VLA, its position coincides with reported near-IR and X-ray sources.
  • Precise knowledge of the hadronic interaction between primary cosmic rays and atmospheric nuclei is very important and fundamental to study atmospheric neutrinos and their oscillations. We studied hadronic interaction models using the data of primary and secondary cosmic rays observed by BESS experiments. By comparing the observed spectra with the ones calculated by several interaction models, we found DPMJET-III is most favored among them.
  • A cosmic ray detection system, consisting of standardized detector stations connected through the Internet, is described. The system can be used for detecting air showers that arrive over a wide area with correlated time. The data at each site are exchanged in (quasi) real time, which makes the system suitable for displaying cosmic ray arrivals at museumns and schools.
  • We analyze the data of the gravitational microlensing survey carried out by by the MOA group during 2000 towards the Galactic Bulge (GB). Our observations are designed to detect efficiently high magnification events with faint source stars and short timescale events, by increasing the the sampling rate up to 6 times per night and using Difference Image Analysis (DIA). We detect 28 microlensing candidates in 12 GB fields corresponding to 16 deg^2. We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate our microlensing event detection efficiency, where we construct the I-band extinction map of our GB fields in order to find dereddened magnitudes. We find a systematic bias and large uncertainty in the measured value of the timescale $t_{\rm Eout}$ in our simulations. They are associated with blending and unresolved sources, and are allowed for in our measurements. We compute an optical depth tau = 2.59_{-0.64}^{+0.84} \times 10^{-6} towards the GB for events with timescales 0.3<t_E<200 days. We consider disk-disk lensing, and obtain an optical depth tau_{bulge} = 3.36_{-0.81}^{+1.11} \times 10^{-6}[0.77/(1-f_{disk})] for the bulge component assuming a 23% stellar contribution from disk stars. These observed optical depths are consistent with previous measurements by the MACHO and OGLE groups, and still higher than those predicted by existing Galactic models. We present the timescale distribution of the observed events, and find there are no significant short events of a few days, in spite of our high detection efficiency for short timescale events down to t_E = 0.3 days. We find that half of all our detected events have high magnification (>10). These events are useful for studies of extra-solar planets.