• We present high-precision spectro-polarimetric data with high spatial resolution (0.4$''$) of the very quiet Sun at 1.56$\mu$m obtained with the GREGOR telescope to shed some light on this complex magnetism. Half of our observed quiet-Sun region is better explained by magnetic substructure within the resolution element. However, we cannot distinguish whether this substructure comes from gradients of the physical parameters along the line of sight or from horizontal gradients (across the surface). In these pixels, a model with two magnetic components is preferred, and we find two distinct magnetic field populations. The population with the larger filling factor has very weak ($\sim$150 G) horizontal fields similar to those obtained in previous works. We demonstrate that the field vector of this population is not constrained by the observations, given the spatial resolution and polarimetric accuracy of our data. The topology of the other component with the smaller filling factor is constrained by the observations for field strengths above 250 G: we infer hG fields with inclinations and azimuth values compatible with an isotropic distribution. The filling factors are typically below 30\%. We also find that the flux of the two polarities is not balanced. From the other half of the observed quiet-Sun area $\sim$50\% are two-lobed Stokes $V$ profiles, meaning that 23\% of the field of view can be adequately explained with a single constant magnetic field embedded in a non-magnetic atmosphere. The magnetic field vector and filling factor are reliable inferred in only 50\% based on the regular profiles. Therefore, 12\% of the field of view harbour hG fields with filling factors typically below 30\%. At our present spatial resolution, 70\% of the pixels apparently are non-magnetised.
  • Regardless of the physical origin of stellar magnetic fields - fossil or dynamo induced - an inclination angle between the magnetic and rotation axes is very often observed. Absence of observational evidence in this direction in the solar case has led to generally assume that its global magnetic field and rotation axes are well aligned. We present the detection of a monthly periodic signal of the photospheric solar magnetic field at all latitudes, and especially near the poles, revealing that the main axis of the Sun's magnetic field is not aligned with the surface rotation axis. This result reinforces the view of our Sun as a common intermediate-mass star. Furthermore this detection challenges and imposes a strong observational constraint to modern solar dynamo theories.
  • We study the polar magnetism near an activity maximum when these regions change their polarity, from which it is expected that its magnetism should be less affected by the global field. To fully characterise the magnetic field vector, we use deep full Stokes polarimetric observations of the 15648.5 {\AA} and 15652.8 {\AA} FeI lines. We observe the north pole as well as a quiet region at disc centre to compare their field distributions. In order to calibrate the projection effects, we observe an additional quiet region at the east limb. We find that the two limb datasets share similar magnetic field vector distributions. This means that close to a maximum, the poles look like typical limb, quiet-Sun regions. However, the magnetic field distributions at the limbs are different from the distribution inferred at disc centre. At the limbs, we infer a new population of magnetic fields with relatively strong intensities ($\sim$600-$\sim$800 G), inclined by 30 deg with respect to the line of sight, and with an azimuth aligned with the solar disc radial direction. We propose that this new population at the limbs is due to the observation of unresolved magnetic loops as seen close to the limb. These loops have typical granular sizes as measured in the disc centre. At the limbs, where the spatial resolution decreases, we observe them spatially unresolved, which explains the new population of magnetic fields that is inferred. This is the first (indirect) evidence of small-scale magnetic loops outside the disc centre and would imply that these small-scale structures are ubiquitous on the entire solar surface. This result has profound implications for the energetics not only of the photosphere, but also of the outer layers since these loops have been reported to reach the chromosphere and the low corona.
  • Tabetha S. Boyajian, Roi Alonso, Alex Ammerman, David Armstrong, A. Asensio Ramos, K. Barkaoui, Thomas G. Beatty, Z. Benkhaldoun, Paul Benni, Rory Bentley, Andrei Berdyugin, Svetlana Berdyugina, Serge Bergeron, Allyson Bieryla, Michaela G. Blain, Alicia Capetillo Blanco, Eva H. L. Bodman, Anne Boucher, Mark Bradley, Stephen M. Brincat, Thomas G. Brink, John Briol, David J. A. Brown, J.Budaj, A. Burdanov, B. Cale, Miguel Aznar Carbo, R. Castillo Garcia, Wendy J Clark, Geoffrey C. Clayton, James L. Clem, Phillip H Coker, Evan M. Cook, Chris M. Copperwheat, J. Curtis, R. M. Cutri, B. Cseh, C. H. Cynamon, Alex J. Daniels, James R. A. Davenport, Hans J. Deeg, Roberto De Lorenzo, Thomas De Jaeger, Jean-Bruno Desrosiers, John Dolan, D. J. Dowhos, Franky Dubois, R. Durkee, Shawn Dvorak, Lynn Easley, N. Edwards, Tyler G. Ellis, Emery Erdelyi, Steve Ertel, Rafael. G. Farfán, J. Farihi, Alexei V. Filippenko, Emma Foxell, Davide Gandolfi, Faustino Garcia, F. Giddens, M. Gillon, Juan-Luis González-Carballo, C. González-Fernández, J. I. González Hernández, Keith A. Graham, Kenton A. Greene, J. Gregorio, Na'ama Hallakoun, Ottó Hanyecz, G. R. Harp, Gregory W. Henry, E. Herrero, Caleb F. Hildbold, D. Hinzel, G. Holgado, Bernadett Ignácz, Valentin D. Ivanov, E. Jehin, Helen E. Jermak, Steve Johnston, S. Kafka, Csilla Kalup, Emmanuel Kardasis, Shai Kaspi, Grant M. Kennedy, F. Kiefer, C. L. Kielty, Dennis Kessler, H. Kiiskinen, T. L. Killestein, Ronald A. King, V. Kollar, H. Korhonen, C. Kotnik, Réka Könyves-Tóth, Levente Kriskovics, Nathan Krumm, Vadim Krushinsky, E. Kundra, Francois-Rene Lachapelle, D. Lacourse, P. Lake, Kristine Lam, Gavin P. Lamb, Dave Lane, Marie Wingyee Lau, Pablo Lewin, Chris Lintott, Carey Lisse, Ludwig Logie, Nicolas Longeard, M. Lopez Villanueva, E. Whit Ludington, A. Mainzer, Lison Malo, Chris Maloney, A. Mann, A. Mantero, Massimo Marengo, Jon Marchant, M. J. Martinez González, Joseph R. Masiero, Jon C. Mauerhan, James Mccormac, Aaron Mcneely, Huan Y. A. Meng, Mike Miller, Lawrence A. Molnar, J. C. Morales, Brett M. Morris, Matthew W. Muterspaugh, David Nespral, C. R. Nugent, Katherine M. Nugent, A. Odasso, Derek O'keeffe, A. Oksanen, John M. O'meara, András Ordasi, Hugh Osborn, John J. Ott, J. R. Parks, Diego Rodriguez Perez, Vance Petriew, R. Pickard, András Pál, P. Plavchan, C. Westendorp Plaza, Don Pollacco, F. Pozo Nuñez, F. J. Pozuelos, Steve Rau, Seth Redfield, Howard Relles, I. Ribas, Jon Richards, Joonas L. O. Saario, Emily J. Safron, J. Martin Sallai, Krisztián Sárneczky, Bradley E. Schaefer, Clea F. Schumer, Madison Schwartzendruber, Michael H. Siegel, Andrew P. V. Siemion, Brooke D. Simmons, Joshua D. Simon, S. Simón-Diaz, Michael L. Sitko, Hector Socas-Navarro, Á. Sódor, Donn Starkey, Iain A. Steele, Geoff Stone, R.A. Street, Tricia Sullivan, J. Suomela, J. J. Swift, Gyula M. Szabó, Róbert Szabó, Róbert Szakáts, Tamás Szalai, Angelle M. Tanner, B. Toledo-Padrón, Tamás Tordai, Amaury H.M.J. Triaud, Jake D. Turner, Joseph H. Ulowetz, Marian Urbanik, Siegfried Vanaverbeke, Andrew Vanderburg, Krisztián Vida, Brad P. Vietje, József Vinkó, K. Von Braun, Elizabeth O. Waagen, Dan Walsh, Christopher A. Watson, R.C. Weir, Klaus Wenzel, Michael W. Williamson, Jason T. Wright, M. C. Wyatt, Weikang Zheng, Gabriella Zsidi
    Jan. 2, 2018 astro-ph.SR, astro-ph.EP
    We present a photometric detection of the first brightness dips of the unique variable star KIC 8462852 since the end of the Kepler space mission in 2013 May. Our regular photometric surveillance started in October 2015, and a sequence of dipping began in 2017 May continuing on through the end of 2017, when the star was no longer visible from Earth. We distinguish four main 1-2.5% dips, named "Elsie," "Celeste," "Skara Brae," and "Angkor", which persist on timescales from several days to weeks. Our main results so far are: (i) there are no apparent changes of the stellar spectrum or polarization during the dips; (ii) the multiband photometry of the dips shows differential reddening favoring non-grey extinction. Therefore, our data are inconsistent with dip models that invoke optically thick material, but rather they are in-line with predictions for an occulter consisting primarily of ordinary dust, where much of the material must be optically thin with a size scale <<1um, and may also be consistent with models invoking variations intrinsic to the stellar photosphere. Notably, our data do not place constraints on the color of the longer-term "secular" dimming, which may be caused by independent processes, or probe different regimes of a single process.
  • Stellar prominences detected in rapidly rotating stars serve as probes of the magnetism in the corona of cool stars. We have synthesized the temporal evolution of the Stokes profiles generated in the He I 10830 and 5876 A triplets during the rotation of a prominence around a star. The synthesis was performed with the HAZEL code using a cloud model in which the prominence is characterized by a slab located at a fixed latitude and height. It accounts for the scattering polarization and Zeeman and Hanle effects. Several cases with different prominence magnetic field strengths and orientations have been analyzed. The results show an emission feature that drifts across the profile while the prominence is out of the stellar disk. When the prominence eclipses the star, the intensity profile shows an absorption. The scattering induced by the prominence generates linear polarization signals in Stokes Q and U profiles, which are modified by the Hanle effect when a magnetic field is present. Due to the Zeeman effect, Stokes V profiles show a signal with very low amplitude when the magnetic field along the line-of-sight is different from zero. The estimated linear polarization signals could potentially be detected with the future spectropolarimeter MIRADAS, to be attached to GTC telescope.
  • The origin of the unification model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) was the detection of broad hydrogen recombination lines in the optical polarized spectrum of the Seyfert 2 galaxy (Sy2) NGC 1068. Since then, a search for the hidden broad-line region (HBLR) of nearby Sy2s started, but polarized broad lines have only been detected in 30-40% of the nearby Sy2s observed to date. Here we present new VLT/FORS2 optical spectropolarimetry of a sample of 15 Sy2s, including Compton-thin and Compton-thick sources. The sample includes six galaxies without previously published spectropolarimetry, some of them normally treated as non-hidden BLR (NHBLR) objects in the literature, four classified as NHBLR, and five as HBLR based on previous data. We report >=4{\sigma} detections of a HBLR in 11 of these galaxies (73% of the sample) and a tentative detection in NGC 5793, which is Compton-thick according to the analysis of X-ray data performed here. Our results confirm that at least some NHBLRs are misclassified, bringing previous publications reporting differences between HBLR and NHBLR objects into question. We detect broad H{\alpha} and H{\beta} components in polarized light for 10 targets, and just broad H{\alpha} for NGC 5793 and NGC 6300, with line widths ranging between 2100 and 9600 km/s. High bolometric luminosities and low column densities are associated with higher polarization degrees, but not necessarily with the detection of the scattered broad components.
  • Solar tornadoes are dark vertical filamentary structures observed in the extreme ultraviolet associated with prominence legs and filament barbs. Their true nature and relationship to prominences requires understanding their magnetic structure and dynamic properties. Recently, a controversy has arisen: is the magnetic field organized forming vertical, helical structures or is it dominantly horizontal? And concerning their dynamics, are tornadoes really rotating or is it just a visual illusion? Here, we analyze four consecutive spectropolarimetric scans of a prominence hosting tornadoes on its legs which help us shed some light on their magnetic and dynamical properties. We show that the magnetic field is very smooth in all the prominence, probably an intrinsic property of the coronal field. The prominence legs have vertical helical fields that show slow temporal variation probably related to the motion of the fibrils. Concerning the dynamics, we argue that 1) if rotation exists, it is intermittent, lasting no more than one hour, and 2) the observed velocity pattern is also consistent with an oscillatory velocity pattern (waves).
  • Recent spectropolarimetric observations of active region filaments have revealed polarization profiles with signatures typical of the strong field Zeeman regime. The conspicuous absence in those observations of scattering polarization and Hanle effect signatures was then pointed out by some authors. This was interpreted either as a signature of mixed "turbulent" field components or as a result of optical thickness. In this article, we present a natural scenario to explain these Zeeman-only spectro-polarimetric observations of active region filaments. We propose a two-component model, one on top of the other. Both components have horizontal fields, the azimuth difference between them being close to 90 degrees. The component that lies lower in the atmosphere is permeated by a strong field of the order of 600 G, while the upper component has much weaker fields, of the order of 10 G. The ensuing scattering polarization signatures of the individual components have opposite signs, so that its combination along the line of sight reduces --and even can cancel out-- the Hanle signatures, giving rise to an apparent only-Zeeman profile. This model is also applicable to other chromospheric structures seen in absorption above active regions.
  • Solar prominences are clouds of cool plasma levitating above the solar surface and insulated from the million-degree corona by magnetic fields. They form in regions of complex magnetic topology, characterized by non-potential fields, which can evolve abruptly, disintegrating the prominence and ejecting magnetized material into the heliosphere. However, their physics is not yet fully understood because mapping such complex magnetic configurations and their evolution is extremely challenging, and must often be guessed by proxy from photometric observations.Using state-of-the-art spectro-polarimetric data, we reconstruct the structure of the magnetic field in a prominence. We find that prominence feet harbor helical magnetic fields connecting the prominence to the solar surface below.
  • We carried out high-sensitivity spectropolarimetric observations of the central star of the Red Rectangle proto-planetary nebula with the aim of constraining the mechanism that gives its biconical shape. The stellar light of the central binary system is linearly polarised since it is scattered on the dust particles of the nebula. Surprisingly, the linear polarisation in the continuum is aligned with one of the spikes of the biconical outflow. Also, the observed Balmer lines as well as the Ca II K lines are polarised. These observational constraints are used to confirm or reject current theoretical models for the shaping mechanism of the Red Rectangle. We propose that the observed polarisation is very unlikely generated by a uniform biconical stellar wind. Also, the hypothesis of a precessing jet does not completely match the observations since it will require a jet aperture larger than that of the nebula.
  • We derive exact expressions for the degree of lineal polarization over a resolved or integrated stellar disc due to resonance scattering and the Hanle effect from a dipolar or quadrupolar distribution of magnetic fields. We apply the theory of scattering polarization within the formalism of the spherical tensors representation for the density matrix and radiation field. The distribution of linear polarization over the stellar disk for different configurations of the magnetic field is studied and its topology discussed. For an unresolved dipole, the resulting polarization can be expressed in terms of just three functions (of the inclination angle and effective dipole strength), that are calculated numerically and their behaviour discussed. Dipolar and (aligned) quadrupoles are considered in some detail, but the techniques here ---in particular, the extensive use of the spherical tensor formalism for polarization---, can easily be applied to more general field configurations.
  • We analyze the spectral asymmetry of Stokes V (circularly polarized) profiles of an individual network patch in the quiet Sun observed by Sunrise/IMaX. At a spatial resolution of 0.15"-0.18", the network elements contain substructure which is revealed by the spatial distribution of Stokes V asymmetries. The area asymmetry between the red and blue lobes of Stokes V increases from nearly zero at the core of the structure to values close to unity at its edges (one-lobed profiles). Such a distribution of the area asymmetry is consistent with magnetic fields expanding with height, i.e., an expanding magnetic canopy (which is required to fulfill pressure balance and flux conservation in the solar atmosphere). Inversion of the Stokes I and V profiles of the patch confirms this picture, revealing a decreasing field strength and increasing height of the canopy base from the core to the periphery of the network patch. However, the non-roundish shape of the structure and the presence of negative area and amplitude asymmetries reveal that the scenario is more complex than a canonical flux tube expanding with height surrounded by downflows.
  • We report Stokes vector observations of solar spicules and a prominence in the He I 1083 nm multiplet carried out with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter. The observations show linear polarization profiles that are produced by scattering processes in the presence of a magnetic field. After a careful data reduction, we demonstrate the existence of extremely asymmetric Stokes V profiles in the spicular material that we are able to model with two magnetic components along the line of sight, and under the presence of atomic orientation in the energy levels that give rise to the multiplet. We discuss some possible scenarios that can generate the atomic orientation in spicules. We stress the importance of spectropolarimetric observations across the limb to distinguish such signals from observational artifacts.
  • We analyze two regions of the quiet Sun (35.6 x 35.6 Mm^2) observed at high spatial resolution (~100 km) in polarized light by the IMaX spectropolarimeter onboard the Sunrise balloon. We identify 497 small-scale (~400 km) magnetic loops, appearing at an effective rate of 0.25 loop h^{-1} arcsec^{-2}; further, we argue that this number and rate are underestimated by ~30%. However, we find that these small dipoles do not appear uniformly on the solar surface: their spatial distribution is rather filamentary and clumpy, creating dead calm areas, characterized by a very low magnetic signal and a lack of organized loop-like structures at the detection level of our instruments, that cannot be explained as just statistical fluctuations of a Poisson spatial process. We argue that this is an intrinsic characteristic of the mechanism that generates the magnetic fields in the very quiet Sun. The spatio-temporal coherences and the clumpy structure of the phenomenon suggest a recurrent, intermittent mechanism for the generation of magnetic fields in the quietest areas of the Sun.
  • The observation of the polarization emerging from a rotating star at different phases opens up the possibility to map the magnetic field in the stellar surface thanks to the well-known Zeeman Doppler Imaging. When the magnetic field is sufficiently weak, the circular and linear polarization profiles locally in each point of the star are proportional to the first and second derivatives of the unperturbed intensity profile, respectively. We show that the weak-field approximation (for weak lines in the case of linear polarization) can be generalized to the case of a rotating star including the Doppler effect and taking into account the integration on the stellar surface. The Stokes profiles are written as a linear combination of wavelength-dependent terms expressed as series expansions in terms of Hermite polynomials. These terms contain the surface integrated magnetic field and velocity components. The direct numerical evaluation of these quantities is limited to rotation velocities not larger than 8 times the Doppler width of the local absorption profiles. Additionally, we demonstrate that, in a rotating star, the circular polarization flux depends on the derivative of the intensity flux with respect to the wavelength and also on the profile itself. Likewise, the linear polarization depends on the profile and on its first and second derivative with respect to the wavelength. We particularize the general expressions to a rotating dipole.
  • Inferring magnetic and thermodynamic information from spectropolarimetric observations relies on the assumption of a parameterized model atmosphere whose parameters are tuned by comparison with observations. Often, the choice of the underlying atmospheric model is based on subjective reasons. In other cases, complex models are chosen based on objective reasons (for instance, the necessity to explain asymmetries in the Stokes profiles) but it is not clear what degree of complexity is needed. The lack of an objective way of comparing models has, sometimes, led to opposing views of the solar magnetism because the inferred physical scenarios are essentially different. We present the first quantitative model comparison based on the computation of the Bayesian evidence ratios for spectropolarimetric observations. Our results show that there is not a single model appropriate for all profiles simultaneously. Data with moderate signal-to-noise ratios favor models without gradients along the line-of-sight. If the observations shows clear circular and linear polarization signals above the noise level, models with gradients along the line are preferred. As a general rule, observations with large signal-to-noise ratios favor more complex models. We demonstrate that the evidence ratios correlate well with simple proxies. Therefore, we propose to calculate these proxies when carrying out standard least-squares inversions to allow for model comparison in the future.
  • Full Stokes filter-polarimeters are key instruments for investigating the rapid evolution of magnetic structures on the solar surface. To this end, the image quality is routinely improved using a-posteriori image reconstruction methods. We analyze the robustness of circular polarization asymmetries to phase-diversity image reconstruction techniques. We use snapshots of magneto-hydrodynamical simulations carried out with different initial conditions to synthesize spectra of the magnetically sensitive Fe I line at 5250.2 A. We degrade the synthetic profiles spatially and spectrally to simulate observations with the IMaX full Stokes filter-polarimeter. We also simulate the focused/defocused pairs of images used by the phase-diversity algorithm for reconstruction and the polarimetric modulation scheme. We assume that standard optimization methods are able to infer the projection of the wavefront on the Zernike polynomials with 10% precision. We also consider the less favorable case of 25% precision. We obtain reconstructed monochromatic modulated images that are later demodulated and compared with the original maps. Although asymmetries are often difficult to define in the quiet Sun due to the complexity of the Stokes V profiles, we show how asymmetries are degraded with spatial and spectral smearing. The results indicate that, although image reconstruction techniques reduce the spatial smearing, they can modify the asymmetries of the profiles, mainly caused by the appearance of spatially-correlated noise.
  • The polarised spectrum of stellar radiation encodes valuable information on the conditions of stellar atmospheres and the magnetic fields that permeate them. In this paper, we give explicit expressions to estimate the magnetic field vector and its associated error from the observed Stokes parameters. We study the solar case where specific intensities are observed and then the stellar case, where we receive the polarised flux. In this second case, we concentrate on the explicit expression for the case of a slow rotator with a dipolar magnetic field geometry. Moreover, we also give explicit formulae to retrieve the magnetic field vector from the LSD profiles without assuming mean values for the LSD artificial spectral line. The formulae have been obtained assuming that the spectral lines can be described in the weak field regime and using a maximum likelihood approach. The errors are recovered by means of the hermitian matrix. The bias of the estimators are analysed in depth.
  • The presence of magnetic fields is an attractive hypothesis for shaping PNe. We report on observations of the central star of the two Planetary Nebulae NGC1360 and LSS1326. We performed spectroscopy on circularly polarized light with the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory. Contrary to previous reports (Jordan et al. 2005, A&A, 432, 273), we find that the effective magnetic field, that is the average over the visible stellar disk of longitudinal components of the magnetic fields, is null within errors for both stars. We conclude that a direct evidence of magnetic fields on the central stars of PNe is still missing --- either the magnetic field is much weaker (< 600 G) than previously reported, or more complex (thus leading to cancellations), or both. Certainly, indirect evidences (e.g., MASER emission) fully justify further efforts to study the strength and morphology of such magnetic fields.
  • We present observational evidence for oscillations of magnetic flux density in the quiet areas of the Sun. The majority of magnetic fields on the solar surface have strengths of the order of or lower than the equipartition field (300-500 G). This results in a myriad of magnetic fields whose evolution is largely determined by the turbulent plasma motions. When granules evolve they squash the magnetic field lines together or pull them apart. Here we report on the periodic deformation of the shapes of features in circular polarization observed at high resolution with Sunrise. In particular, we note that the area of patches with constant magnetic flux oscillates with time, which implies that the apparent magnetic field intensity oscillates in antiphase. The periods associated to this oscillatory pattern is compatible with the granular life-time and change abruptly, which suggests that these oscillations might not correspond to characteristic oscillatory modes of magnetic structures, but to the forcing by granular motions. In one particular case, we find three patches around the same granule oscillating in phase, which means that the spatial coherence of these oscillations can reach 1600 km. Interestingly, the same kind of oscillatory phenomenon is found also in the upper photosphere.
  • Sunspots are the most spectacular manifestation of solar magnetism, yet, 99% of the solar surface remains 'quiet' at any time of the solar cycle. The quiet sun is not void of magnetic fields, though; they are organized at smaller spatial scales and evolve relatively fast, which makes them difficult to detect. Thus, although extensive quiet Sun magnetism would be a natural driver to a uniform, steady heating of the outer solar atmosphere, it is not clear what the physical processes involved would be due to lack of observational evidence. We report the topology and dynamics of the magnetic field in very quiet regions of the Sun from spectropolarimetric observations of the Hinode satellite, showing a continuous injection of magnetic flux with a well organized topology of Omega-loop from below the solar surface into the upper layers. At first stages, when the loop travels across the photosphere, it has a flattened (staple-like) geometry and a mean velocity ascent of $\sim3$ km/s. When the loop crosses the minimum temperature region, the magnetic fields at the footpoints become almost vertical and the loop topology ressembles a potential field. The mean ascent velocity at chromospheric height is $\sim12$ km/s. The energy input rate of these small-scale loops in the lower boundary of the chromosphere is (at least) of 1.4x10^6-2.2x10^7 erg cm-2 s-1. Our findings provide empirical evidence for solar magnetism as a multi-scale system, in which small-scale low-flux magnetism plays a crucial role, at least as important as active regions, coupling different layers of the solar atmosphere and being an important ingredient for chromospheric and coronal heating models.
  • The behavior of the observed polarization amplitudes with spatial resolution is a strong constraint on the nature and organization of solar magnetic fields below the resolution limit. We study the polarization of the very quiet Sun at different spatial resolutions using ground- and space-based observations. It is shown that 80% of the observed polarization signals do not change with spatial resolution, suggesting that, observationally, the very quiet Sun magnetism remains the same despite the high spatial resolution of space-based observations. Our analysis also reveals a cascade of spatial scales for the magnetic field within the resolution element. It is manifest that the Zeeman effect is sensitive to the microturbulent field usually associated to Hanle diagnostics. This demonstrates that Zeeman and Hanle studies show complementary perspectives of the same magnetism.
  • We investigate the emergence of magnetic flux in the quiet Sun at very small spatial scales, focusing on the magnetic connection between the photosphere and chromosphere. The observational data consist of spectropolarimetric measurements and filtergrams taken with the Hinode satellite and the Dutch Open Telescope. We find that a significant fraction of the magnetic flux present in internetwork regions appears in the form of Omega-shaped loops. The emergence rate is 0.02 loops per hour and arcsec^{-2}, which brings 1.1 x 10^12 Mx s^{-1} arcsec^{-2} of new flux to the solar surface. Initially, the loops are observed as small patches of linear polarization above a granular cell. Shortly afterwards, two footpoints of opposite polarity become visible in circular polarization within or at the edges of the granule and start to move toward the adjacent intergranular space. The orientation of the footpoints does not seem to obey Hale's polarity rules. The loops are continuously buffeted by convective motions, but they always retain a high degree of coherence. Interestingly, 23% of the loops that emerge in the photosphere reach the chromosphere (16 cases out of 69). They are first detected in Fe I 630 nm magnetograms and 5 minutes later in Mg I b 517.3 nm magnetograms. After about 8 minutes, some of them are also observed in Ca II H line-core images, where the footpoints produce small brightness enhancements.
  • Our main objective is to develop a denoising strategy to increase the signal to noise ratio of individual spectral lines of stellar spectropolarimetric observations. We use a multivariate statistics technique called Principal Component Analysis. The cross-product matrix of the observations is diagonalized to obtain the eigenvectors in which the original observations can be developed. This basis is such that the first eigenvectors contain the greatest variance. Assuming that the noise is uncorrelated a denoising is possible by reconstructing the data with a truncated basis. We propose a method to identify the number of eigenvectors for an efficient noise filtering. Numerical simulations are used to demonstrate that an important increase of the signal to noise ratio per spectral line is possible using PCA denoising techniques. It can be also applied for detection of magnetic fields in stellar atmospheres. We analyze the relation between PCA and commonly used well-known techniques like line addition and least-squares deconvolution. Moreover, PCA is very robust and easy to compute.
  • We study the contradictory magnetic field strength distributions retrieved from independent analyses of spectropolarimetric observations in the near-infrared (1.56 micron) and in the visible (630 nm) at internetwork regions. In order to solve this apparent controversy, we present simultaneous and co-spatial 1.56 micron and 630 nm observations of an internetwork area. The properties of the circular and linear polarization signals, as well as the Stokes V area and amplitude asymmetries, are discussed. As a complement, inversion techniques are also used to infer the physical parameters of the solar atmosphere. As a first step, the infrared and visible observations are analysed separately to check their compatibility. Finally, the simultaneous inversion of the two data sets is performed. The magnetic flux densities retrieved from the individual analysis of the infrared and visible data sets are strongly correlated. The polarity of the Stokes V profiles is the same at co-spatial pixels in both wavelength ranges. This indicates that both 1.56 micron and 630 nm observations trace the same magnetic structures on the solar surface. The simultaneous inversion of the two pairs of lines reveals an internetwork full of sub-kG structures that fill only 2 % of the resolution element. A correlation is found between the magnetic field strength and the continuum intensity: equipartition fields (B ~500 G) tend to be located in dark intergranular lanes, whereas weaker field structures are found inside granules. The most probable unsigned magnetic flux density is 10 Mx/cm2. The net magnetic flux density in the whole field of view is nearly zero. This means that both polarities cancel out almost exactly in our observed internetwork area.