• An outstanding problem in the field of high-transition-temperature (high Tc) superconductivity is the identification of the normal state out of which superconductivity emerges in the mysterious underdoped regime. The normal state uncomplicated by thermal fluctuations is effectively accessed by the use of applied magnetic fields sufficiently strong to suppress long-range superconductivity at low temperatures. Proposals in which the normal ground state is characterised by small Fermi surface pockets that exist in the absence of symmetry breaking have been superseded by models based on the existence of a superlattice that breaks the translational symmetry of the underlying lattice. Recently, a charge superlattice model that positions a small electron-like Fermi pocket in the vicinity of the nodes (where the superconducting gap is minimum) has been proposed a replacement for the prevalent superlattice models that position the Fermi pocket in the vicinity of the pseudogap at the antinodes (where the superconducting gap is maximum). Although some ingredients of symmetry breaking have been recently revealed by crystallographic studies, their relevance to the electronic structure remains unresolved. Here we report angle-resolved quantum oscillation measurements in the underdoped copper oxide YBa2Cu3O6+x. These measurements reveal a normal ground state comprising electron-like Fermi surface pockets located in the vicinity of the superconducting gap minima (or nodes), and further point to an underlying superlattice structure of low frequency and long wavelength with features in common with the charge order identified recently by complementary spectroscopic techniques.
  • We present magnetization and magnetostriction studies of the insulating perovskite LaCoO3 in magnetic fields approaching 100 T. In marked contrast with expectations from single-ion models, the data reveal two distinct first-order spin transitions and well-defined magnetization plateaux. The magnetization at the higher plateau is only about half the saturation value expected for spin-1 Co3+ ions. These findings strongly suggest collective behavior induced by strong interactions between different electronic -- and therefore spin -- configurations of Co3+ ions. We propose a model of these interactions that predicts crystalline spin textures and a cascade of four magnetic phase transitions at high fields, of which the first two account for the experimental data.
  • In this article we review our studies of the K0.80Fe1.76Se2 superconductor, with an attempt to elucidate the crystal growth details and basic physical properties over a wide range of temperatures and applied magnetic field, including anisotropic magnetic and electrical transport properties, thermodynamic, London penetration depth, magneto-optical imaging and Mossbauer measurements. We find that: (i) Single crystals of similar stoichiometry can be grown both by furnace-cooled and decanted methods; (ii) Single crystalline K0.80Fe1.76Se2 shows moderate anisotropy in both magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity and a small modulation of stoichiometry of the crystal, which gives rise to broadened transitions; (iii) The upper critical field, Hc2(T) is ~ 55 T at 2 K for H||c, manifesting a temperature dependent anisotropy that peaks near 3.6 at 27 K and drops to 2.5 by 18 K; (iv) Mossbauer measurements reveal that the iron sublattice in K0.80Fe1.76Se2 clearly exhibits magnetic order, probably of the first order, from well below Tc to its Neel temperature of Tn = 532 +/- 2 K. It is very important to note that, although, at first glance there is an apparent dilemma posed by these data: high Tc superconductivity in a near insulating, large ordered moment material, analysis indicates that the sample may well consist of two phases with the minority superconducting phase (that does not exhibit magnetic order) being finely distributed, but connected with in an antiferromagnetic, poorly conducting, matrix, essentially making a superconducting aerogel.
  • The upper critical fields, Hc2 of single crystals of Sr1-xEux(Fe0.89Co0.11)2As2(x=0.203 and 0.463) were determined by radio frequency penetration depth measurements in pulsed magnetic fields. Hc2 approaches the Pauli limiting field but shows an upward curvature with an enhancement from the orbital limited field as inferred from Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory. We discuss the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields and the decreasing anisotropy using a two-band BCS model.
  • We present a detailed study of quantum oscillations in the antiferromagnetically ordered pnictide compound SrFe$_2$As$_2$ as the angle between the applied magnetic field and crystalline axes is varied. Our measurements were performed on high quality single crystals in a superconducting magnet, and in pulsed magnetic fields up to 60 T, allowing us to observe orbits from several small Fermi surface pockets. We extract the cyclotron effective mass $m^{\star}$ and frequency $F$ for these orbits and track their values as the field is rotated away from the c-axis. While a constant ratio of $m^{\star}/F$ is observed for one orbit as expected for a parabolic band, a clear deviation is observed for another. We conclude that this deviation points to an orbit derived from a band with Dirac dispersion near the Fermi level.
  • We report the direct observation of multiple `spin zeroes' in angle-dependent magnetic quantum oscillations measured up to 85T in YBa2Cu3O6+x, at which the amplitude falls to a deep minimum accompanied by a phase inversion of the measured quantum oscillations, enabling the product of the effective mass and effective g-factor m*g* to be tightly constrained. We find an evolution of the location of the spin zeros with applied magnetic field, and suggest that this effect and the absence of a spin zero at low angles can be produced by more than one Fermi surface component, and an effective g-factor with a subtle anisotropy between in-plane and out-of-plane crystalline directions.
  • The mystery of the normal state in the underdoped cuprates has deepened with the use of newer and complementary experimental probes. While photoemission studies have revealed solely `Fermi arcs' centered on nodal points in the Brillouin zone at which holes aggregate upon doping, more recent quantum oscillation experiments have been interpreted in terms of an ambipolar Fermi surface, that includes sections containing electron carriers located at the antinodal region. To address the question of whether an ambipolar Fermi surface truly exists, here we utilize measurements of the second harmonic quantum oscillations, which reveal that the amplitude of these oscillations arises mainly from oscillations in the chemical potential, providing crucial information on the nature of the Fermi surface in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x. In particular, the detailed relationship between the second harmonic amplitude and the fundamental amplitude of the quantum oscillations leads us to the conclusion that there exists only a single underlying quasi-two dimensional Fermi surface pocket giving rise to the multiple frequency components observed via the effects of warping, bilayer splitting and magnetic breakdown. A range of studies suggest that the pocket is most likely associated with states near the nodal region of the Brillouin zone of underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x at high magnetic fields.
  • We report quantum oscillations in the underdoped high Tc YBCO over a wide range in magnetic field 28<B<85 T corresponding to ~12 oscillations, enabling the Fermi surface topology to be mapped to high resolution. As earlier reported by Sebastian et al., we find a Fermi surface comprising multiple pockets, as revealed by the additional distinct quantum oscillation frequencies and harmonics reported in this work. We find the originally reported broad low frequency Fourier peak at 535 T to be clearly resolved into three separate peaks at 460 T, 532 T and 602 T. Our increased resolution and angle-resolved measurements identify these frequencies to originate from two similarly sized pockets with greatly contrasting degrees of interlayer corrugation. The spectrally dominant frequency originates from a pocket (\alpha) that is almost ideally two-dimensional in form. In contrast, the newly resolved weaker adjacent spectral features originate from a deeply corrugated pocket (\gamma). On comparison with band structure, the d-wave symmetry of the interlayer dispersion locates the minimally corrugated \alpha pocket at the 'nodal' point where holes are located in a translational symmetry-broken scenario, and the significantly corrugated \gamma pocket at the 'antinodal' point in the Brillouin zone, where electrons are located in a translational symmetry-broken scenario. Translational symmetry breaking by an SDW is suggested from the strong suppression of Zeeman splitting for the spectrally dominant pocket, additional evidence for which is provided from the harmonics we resolve in the present experiments. Given the similarity in \alpha and \gamma pocket sizes, their opposite carrier type and the previous report of a diverging effective mass, we discuss the possibility of a secondary Fermi surface instability at low dopings of the excitonic insulator type, associated with the metal-insulator QCP.
  • We use magnetic quantum oscillations in the underdoped high Tc superconductor YBa_2Cu_3O_(6+x) (x=0.56) measured over a broad range of temperatures 100 mK<T<18 K to extract the form of the distribution function describing the low-lying quasiparticle excitations in high magnetic fields. Despite the proximity of YBa_2Cu_3O_(6+x) (x=0.56) to a Mott insulating state, various broken symmetry ground states and/or states with different quasiparticle statistics, we find that our experimental results can be understood in terms of quasiparticle excitations obeying Fermi-Dirac statistics as in the Landau Fermi liquid theory.
  • An enduring question in correlated systems concerns whether superconductivity is favoured at a quantum critical point (QCP) characterised by a divergent quasiparticle effective mass. Despite such a scenario being widely postulated in high Tc cuprates and invoked to explain non-Fermi liquid transport signatures, experimental evidence is lacking for a critical divergence under the superconducting dome. We use ultra-strong magnetic fields to measure quantum oscillations in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x, revealing a dramatic doping-dependent upturn in quasiparticle effective mass at a critical metal-insulator transition beneath the superconducting dome. Given the location of this QCP under a plateau in Tc in addition to a postulated QCP at optimal doping, we discuss the intriguing possibility of two intersecting superconducting subdomes, each centred at a critical Fermi surface instability.
  • We report high-pressure skin depth measurements on the heavy fermion material CeIn3 in magnetic fields up to 64 T using a self-resonant tank circuit based on a tunnel diode oscillator. At ambient pressure, an anomaly in the skin depth is seen at 45 T. The field where this anomaly occurs decreases with applied pressure until approximately 1.0 GPa, where it begins to increase before merging with the antiferromagnetic phase boundary. Possible origins for this transport anomaly are explored in terms of a Fermi surface reconstruction. The critical magnetic field at which the Neel ordered phase is suppressed is also mapped as a function of pressure and extrapolates to the previous ambient pressure measurements at high magnetic fields and high pressure measurements at zero magnetic field.