• There has been considerable interest in topological semi-metals that exhibit extreme magnetoresistance (XMR). These have included materials lacking inversion symmetry such as TaAs, as well Dirac semi-metals such as Cd3As2. However, it was reported recently that LaSb and LaBi also exhibit XMR, even though the rock-salt structure of these materials has inversion symmetry, and the band-structure calculations do not show a Dirac dispersion in the bulk. Here, we present magnetoresistance and specific heat measurements on NdSb, which is isostructural with LaSb. NdSb has an antiferromagnetic groundstate, and in analogy with the lanthanum monopnictides, is expected to be a topologically non-trivial semi-metal. We show that NdSb has an XMR of 10^4 %, even within the AFM state, illustrating that XMR can occur independently of the absence of time reversal symmetry breaking in zero magnetic field. The persistence of XMR in a magnetic system offers promise of new functionality when combining topological matter with electronic correlations. We also find that in an applied magnetic field below the Neel temperature there is a first order transition, consistent with evidence from previous neutron scattering work.
  • Via angular Shubnikov-de Hass (SdH) quantum oscillations measurements, we determine the Fermi surface topology of NbAs, a Weyl semimetal candidate. The SdH oscillations consist of two frequencies, corresponding to two Fermi surface extrema: 20.8 T ($\alpha$-pocket) and 15.6 T ($\beta$-pocket). The analysis, including a Landau fan plot, shows that the $\beta$-pocket has a Berry phase of $\pi$ and a small effective mass $\sim$0.033 $m_0$, indicative of a nontrivial topology in momentum space; whereas the $\alpha$-pocket has a trivial Berry phase of 0 and a heavier effective mass $\sim$0.066 $m_0$. From the effective mass and the $\beta$-pocket frequency we determine that the Weyl node is 110.5 meV from the chemical potential. A novel electron-hole compensation effect is discussed in this system, and its impact on magneto-transport properties is addressed. The difference between NbAs and other monopnictide Weyl semimetals is also discussed.
  • We report transport measurement in zero and applied magnetic field on a single crystal of NbAs. Transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance in the plane of this tetragonal structure does not saturate up to 9 T. In the transverse configuration ($H \parallel c$, $I \perp c$) it is 230,000 \% at 2 K. The Hall coefficient changes sign from hole-like at room temperature to electron-like below $\sim$ 150 K. The electron carrier density and mobility calculated at 2 K based on a single band approximation are 1.8 x 10$^{19}$ cm$^{-3}$ and 3.5 x 10$^{5}$ cm$^2$/Vs, respectively. These values are similar to reported values for TaAs and NbP, and further emphasize that this class of noncentrosymmetric, transition-metal monopnictides is a promising family to explore the properties of Weyl semimetals and the consequences of their novel electronic structure.
  • A topological Dirac semimetal is a novel state of quantum matter which has recently attracted much attention as an apparent 3D version of graphene. In this paper, we report critically important results on the electronic structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal Na3Bi at a surface that reveals its nontrivial groundstate. Our studies, for the first time, reveal that the two 3D Dirac cones go through a topological change in the constant energy contour as a function of the binding energy, featuring a Lifshitz point, which is missing in a strict 3D analog of graphene (in other words Na3Bi is not a true 3D analog of graphene). Our results identify the first example of a band saddle point singularity in 3D Dirac materials. This is in contrast to its 2D analogs such as graphene and the helical Dirac surface states of a topological insulator. The observation of multiple Dirac nodes in Na3Bi connecting via a Lifshitz point along its crystalline rotational axis away from the Kramers point serves as a decisive signature for the symmetry-protected nature of the Dirac semimetal's topological groundstate.
  • Possible topological nature of Kondo and mixed valence insulators has been a recent topic of interest in condensed matter physics. Attention has focused on SmB6, which has long been known to exhibit low temperature transport anomaly, whose origin is of independent interest. We argue that it is possible to resolve the topological nature of surface states by uniquely accessing the surface electronic structure of the low temperature anomalous transport regime through combining state-of-the-art laser- and synchrotron-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with or without spin resolution. A combination of low temperature and ultra-high resolution (laser) which is lacking in previous ARPES studies of this compound is the key to resolve the possible existence of topological surface state in SmB6. Here we outline an experimental algorithm to systematically explore the topological versus trivial or mixed (topological and trivial surface state admixture as in the first 3D TI Bi$_{1-x}$Sb$_x$) nature of the surface states in Kondo and mixed valence insulators. We conclude based on this methodology that the observed topology of the surface Fermi surface in our low temperature data considered within the level of current resolution is consistent with the theoretically predicted topological picture, suggesting a topological origin of the dominant in-gap ARPES signal in SmB6.}
  • Symmetry or topology protected Dirac fermion states in two and three dimensions constitute novel quantum systems that exhibit exotic physical phenomena. However, none of the studied spin-orbit materials are suitable for realizing bulk multiplet Dirac states for the exploration of interacting Dirac physics. Here we present experimental evidence, for the first time, that the compound Na3Bi hosts a bulk spin-orbit Dirac multiplet and their interaction or overlap leads to a Lifshitz transition in momentum space - a condition for realizing interactions involving Dirac states. By carefully preparing the samples at a non-natural-cleavage (100) crystalline surface, we uncover many novel electronic and spin properties in Na3Bi by utilizing high resolution angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements. We observe two bulk 3D Dirac nodes that locate on the opposite sides of the bulk zone center point $\Gamma$, which exhibit a Fermi surface Lifshitz transition and a saddle point singularity. Furthermore, our data shows evidence for the possible existence of theoretically predicted weak 2D nontrivial spin-orbit surface state with helical spin polarization that are nestled between the two bulk Dirac cones, consistent with the theoretically calculated (100) surface-arc-modes. Our main experimental observation of a rich multiplet of Dirac structure and the Lifshitz transition opens the door for inducing electronic instabilities and correlated physical phenomena in Na3Bi, and paves the way for the engineering of novel topological states using Na3Bi predicted in recent theory.
  • The advent of Dirac materials has made it possible to realize two dimensional gases of relativistic fermions with unprecedented transport properties in condensed matter. Their photoconductive control with ultrafast light pulses is opening new perspectives for the transmission of current and information. Here we show that the interplay of surface and bulk transient carrier dynamics in a photoexcited topological insulator can control an essential parameter for photoconductivity - the balance between excess electrons and holes in the Dirac cone. This can result in a strongly out of equilibrium gas of hot relativistic fermions, characterized by a surprisingly long lifetime of more than 50 ps, and a simultaneous transient shift of chemical potential by as much as 100 meV. The unique properties of this transient Dirac cone make it possible to tune with ultrafast light pulses a relativistic nanoscale Schottky barrier, in a way that is impossible with conventional optoelectronic materials.
  • Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy is used to observe changes in the electronic structure of bulk-doped topological insulator Cu$_x$Bi$_2$Se$_3$ as additional copper atoms are deposited onto the cleaved crystal surface. Carrier density and surface-normal electrical field strength near the crystal surface are estimated to consider the effect of chemical surface gating on atypical superconducting properties associated with topological insulator order, such as the dynamics of theoretically predicted Majorana Fermion vortices.
  • Using circular dichroism-angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (CD-ARPES), we report a study of the effect of angular momentum transfer between polarized photons and topological surface states on the surface of highly bulk insulating topological insulator Bi2Te2Se. The photoelectron dichroism is found to be strongly modulated by the frequency of the helical photons including a dramatic sign-flip. Our results suggest that the observed dichroism and its sign-flip are consequences of strong coupling between the photon field and the spin-orbit nature of the Dirac modes on the surface. Our studies reveal the intrinsic dichroic behavior of topological surface states and point toward the potential utility of bulk insulating topological insulators in device applications.
  • Quantitative understanding of the relationship between quantum tunneling and Fermi surface spin polarization is key to device design using topological insulator surface states. By using spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with p-polarized light in topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin films across the metal-to-insulator transition, we observe that for a given film thickness, the spin polarization is large for momenta far from the center of the surface Brillouin zone. In addition, the polarization decreases significantly with enhanced tunneling realized systematically in thin insulating films, whereas magnitude of the polarization saturates to the bulk limit faster at larger wavevectors in thicker metallic films. Our theoretical model calculations capture this delicate relationship between quantum tunneling and Fermi surface spin polarization. Our results suggest that the polarization current can be tuned to zero in thin insulating films forming the basis for a future spin-switch nano-device.
  • The Kondo insulator SmB6 has long been known to exhibit low temperature (T < 10K) transport anomaly and has recently attracted attention as a new topological insulator candidate. By combining low-temperature and high energy-momentum resolution of the laser-based ARPES technique, for the first time, we probe the surface electronic structure of the anomalous conductivity regime. We observe that the bulk bands exhibit a Kondo gap of 14 meV and identify in-gap low-lying states within a 4 meV window of the Fermi level on the (001)-surface of this material. The low-lying states are found to form electron-like Fermi surface pockets that enclose the X and the Gamma points of the surface Brillouin zone. These states disappear as temperature is raised above 15K in correspondence with the complete disappearance of the 2D conductivity channels in SmB6. While the topological nature of the in-gap metallic states cannot be ascertained without spin (spin-texture) measurements our bulk and surface measurements carried out in the transport-anomaly-temperature regime (T < 10K) are consistent with the first-principle predicted Fermi surface behavior of a topological Kondo insulator phase in this material.
  • We present first principles calculations of the nontrivial surface states and their spin-textures in the topological crystalline insulator SnTe. The surface state dispersion on the [001] surface exhibits four Dirac-cones centered along the intersection of the mirror plane and the surface plane. We propose a simple model of two interacting coaxial Dirac cones to describe both the surface state dispersion and the associated spin-texture. While the out-of-the-plane spin polarization is zero due to the crystalline and time-reversal symmetries, the in-plane spin texture shows helicity with some distortion due to the interaction of the two coaxial Dirac cones, indicating a nontrivial mirror Chern number of -2, distinct from the value of -1 in $Z_{2}$ topological insulator such as Bi/Sb alloys or Bi$_2$Se$_3$. The surface state dispersion and its spin-texture would provide an experimentally accessible way to determine the nontrivial mirror Chern number.
  • Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we report electronic structure for representative members of ternary topological insulators. We show that several members of this family, such as Bi2Se2Te, Bi2Te2Se, and GeBi2Te4, exhibit a singly degenerate Dirac-like surface state, while Bi2Se2S is a fully gapped insulator with no measurable surface state. One of these compounds, Bi2Se2Te, shows tunable surface state dispersion upon its electronic alloying with Sb (SbxBi2-xSe2Te series). Other members of the ternary family such as GeBi2Te4 and BiTe1.5S1.5 show an in-gap surface Dirac point, the former of which has been predicted to show nonzero weak topological invariants such as (1;111); thus belonging to a different topological class than BiTe1.5S1.5. The measured band structure presented here will be a valuable guide for interpreting transport, thermoelectric, and thermopower measurements on these compounds. The unique surface band topology observed in these compounds contributes towards identifying designer materials with desired flexibility needed for thermoelectric and spintronic device fabrication.
  • It is predicted that electrons on the surface of a topological insulator can acquire a mass (massive Dirac fermion) by opening up a gap at the Dirac point when time-reversal symmetry is broken via the out-of-plane magnetization. We report photoemission studies on a series of topological insulator materials focusing on the spectral behavior in the vicinity of the Dirac node. Our results show that the spectral intensity is suppressed resulting in a "gap"-like feature in materials with or without any magnetic impurity or doping. The Zeeman gap in magnetically doped samples, expected to be rather small, is likely masked by the non-magnetic strong spectral weight suppression involving a large energy scale we report. The photoemission spectral weight suppression observed around the Dirac node thus cannot be taken as the sole evidence for a time-reversal symmetry breaking magnetic gap. We discuss a few possible extrinsic and kinematic origins of the Dirac point spectral weight suppression ("gap") observed in many commonly studied topological materials.
  • The surface of topological insulators is proposed as a promising platform for spintronics and quantum information applications. In particular, when time- reversal symmetry is broken, topological surface states are expected to exhibit a wide range of exotic spin phenomena for potential implementation in electronics. Such devices need to be fabricated using nanoscale artificial thin films. It is of critical importance to study the spin behavior of artificial topological MBE thin films associated with magnetic dopants, and with regards to quantum size effects related to surface-to-surface tunneling as well as experimentally isolate time-reversal breaking from non-intrinsic surface electronic gaps. Here we present observation of the first (and thorough) study of magnetically induced spin reorientation phenomena on the surface of a topological insulator. Our results reveal dramatic rearrangements of the spin configuration upon magnetic doping contrasted with chemically similar nonmagnetic doping as well as with quantum tunneling phenomena in ultra-thin high quality MBE films. While we observe that the spin rearrangement induced by quantum tunneling occurs in a time-reversal invariant fashion, we present critical and systematic observation of an out-of-plane spin texture evolution correlated with magnetic interactions, which breaks time-reversal symmetry, demonstrating microscopic TRB at a Kramers' point on the surface.
  • We perform systematic angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopic measurements on the lead tin telluride Pb1-xSnxTe pseudobinary alloy system. We show that the (001) crystalline surface, which is a crystalline surface symmetric about the (110) mirror planes of the Pb1-xSnxTe crystal, pos- sesses four metallic surface states within its surface Brillouin zone. Our systematic Fermi surface and band topology measurements show that the observed Dirac-like surface states lie on the symmetric momentum-space cuts. We further show that upon going to higher electron binding energies, the surface states' isoenergetic countours in close vicinity of each X point are observed to hybridize with each other, leading to a Fermi surface fractionalization and the Lifshitz transition. In addition, systematic incident photon energy dependent measurements are performed, which enable us to un- ambiguously identify the surface states from the bulk bands. These systematic measurements of the surface and bulk electronic structure on Pb1-xSnxTe, supported by our first principles calculation results, for the first time, show that the Pb1-xSnxTe system belongs to the topological crystalline insulator phase due to the four band inversions at the L points in its Brillouin zone, which has been recently theoretically predicted.
  • Topological insulators (TIs) are novel materials that manifest spin-polarized Dirac states on their surfaces or at interfaces made with conventional matter. We have measured the electron kinetics of bulk doped TI Bi$_2$Se$_3$ with angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy while depositing cathodic and anodic adatoms on the TI surfaces to add charge carriers of the opposite sign from bulk dopants. These P-N overlayer interfaces create Dirac point transport regimes and larger interface potentials than previous N-N type surface deposition studies, revealing unconventional Rashba-like and surface-bulk electron interactions, and an unusual characteristic distribution of spectral weight near the Dirac point in TI Dirac point interfaces. The electronic structures of P-N doped topological interfaces observed in these experiments are an important step towards the understanding of solid interfaces with topological materials.
  • We describe the crystal growth, crystal structure, and basic electrical properties of Bi2Te1.6S1.4, which incorporates both S and Te in its Tetradymite quintuple layers in the motif -[Te0.8S0.2]-Bi-S-Bi-[Te0.8S0.2]-. This material differs from other Tetradymites studied as topological insulators due to the increased ionic character that arises from its significant S content. Bi2Te1.6S1.4 forms high quality crystals from the melt and is the S-rich limit of the ternary Bi-Te-S {\gamma}-Tetradymite phase at the melting point. The native material is n-type with a low resistivity; Sb substitution, with adjustment of the Te to S ratio, results in a crossover to p-type and resistive behavior at low temperatures. Angle resolved photoemission study shows that topological surface states are present, with the Dirac point more exposed than it is in Bi2Te3 and similar to that seen in Bi2Te2Se. Single crystal structure determination indicates that the S in the outer chalcogen layers is closer to the Bi than the Te, and therefore that the layers supporting the surface states are corrugated on the atomic scale.
  • We perform spin-resolved and spin-integrated angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on a series of compositions in the BiTl(S1-xSex)2 system, focusing on x-values in the vicinity of the critical point for the topological phase transition (the band inversion composition). We observe quasi two dimensional (2D) states on the outer boundary of the bulk electronic bands in the trivial side (non-inverted regime) of the transition. Systematic spin-sensitive measurements reveal that the observed 2D states are spin-momentum locked, whose spin texture resembles the helical spin texture on the surface of a topological insulator. These anomalous states are observed to be only prominent near the critical point, thus are possibly related to strong precursor states of topological phase transition near the relaxed surface.
  • We demonstrate that the layered room temperature ferromagnet Fe7Se8 and the topological insulator Bi2Se3 form crystallographically oriented bulk composite intergrowth crystals. The morphology of the intergrowth in real space and reciprocal space is described. Critically, the basal planes of Bi2Se3 and Fe7Se8 are parallel and hence the good cleavage inherent in the bulk phases is retained. The intergrowth is on the micron scale. Both phases in the intergrowth crystals display their intrinsic bulk properties: the ferromagnetism of the Fe7Se8 is anisotropic, with magnetization easy axis in the plane of the crystals, and ARPES characterization shows that the topological surface states remain present on the Bi2Se3. Analogous behavior is found for what has been called "Fe-doped Bi2Se3."
  • We report a first study of low energy electronic structure and Fermi surface topology for the recently discovered iron-based superconductor Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5 (the 10-3-8 phase, with Tc = 8K), via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Despite its triclinic crystal structure, ARPES results reveal a fourfold symmetric band structure with the absence of Dirac-cone-like Fermi dots (related to magnetism) found around the Brillouin zone corners in other iron-based superconductors. Considering that the triclinic lattice and structural supercell arising from the Pt3As8 intermediary layers, these results indicate that those layers couple only weakly to the FeAs layers in this new superconductor, which has implications for the determination of its potentially novel pairing mechanism.
  • High-temperature superconductivity in iron-arsenic materials (pnictides) near an antiferromagnetic phase raises the possibility of spin-fluctuation-mediated pairing. However, the interplay between antiferromagnetic fluctuations and superconductivity remains unclear in the underdoped regime, which is closer to the antiferromagnetic phase. Here we report that the superconducting gap of the underdoped pnictides scales linearly with the transition temperature, and that a distinct pseudogap coexisting with the SC gap develops on underdoping. This pseudogap occurs on Fermi surface sheets connected by the antiferromagnetic wavevector, where the superconducting pairing is stronger as well, suggesting that antiferromagnetic fluctuations drive both the pseudogap and superconductivity. Interestingly, we found that the pseudogap and the spectral lineshape vary with the Fermi surface quasi-nesting conditions in a fashion that shares similarities with the nodal-antinodal dichotomous behaviour observed in underdoped copper oxide superconductors.
  • The development of spin-based applications of topological insulators requires the knowledge and understanding of spin texture configuration maps as they change via gating in the vicinity of an isolated Dirac node. An isolated (graphene-like) Dirac node, however, does not exist in Bi2Te3. While the isolation of surface states via transport channels has been promisingly achieved in Bi2Te3, it is not known how spin textures modulate while gating the surface. Another drawback of Bi2Te3 is that it features multiple band crossings while chemical potential is placed near the Dirac node (at least 3 not one as in Bi2Se3 and many other topological insulators) and its buried Dirac point is not experimentally accessible for the next generation of experiments which require tuning the chemical potential near an isolated (graphene-like) Dirac node. Here, we image the spin texture of Bi2Te3 and suggest a simple modification to realize a much sought out isolated Dirac node regime critical for almost all potential applications (of topological nature) of Bi2Te3. Finally, we demonstrate carrier control in magnetically and nonmagnetically doped Bi2Te3 essential for realizing giant magneto-optical effects and dissipationless spin current devices involving a Bi2Te3-based platform.
  • We have performed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on the overdoped Ba$_{0.3}$K$_{0.7}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ superconductor ($T_c$ = 22 K). We demonstrate that the superconducting (SC) gap on each Fermi surface (FS) is nearly isotropic whereas the gap value varies from 4.4 to 7.9 meV on different FSs. By comparing with under- and optimally-doped Ba$_{1-x}$K$_x$Fe$_2$As$_2$, we find that the gap value on each FS nearly scales with $T_c$ over a wide doping range (0.25 $\textyen leq$ $x$ $\textyen leq$ 0.7). Although the FS volume and the SC gap magnitude are strongly doping dependent, the multiple nodeless gaps can be commonly fitted by a single gap function assuming pairing up to the second-nearest-neighbor, suggesting the universality of the short-range pairing states with the $s_{\yenpm}$-wave symmetry.
  • We have performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of a new iron-based superconductor Sr4V2O6Fe2As2. While V 3d orbitals are found to be in a Mott insulator state and show an incoherent peak at ~ 1 eV below the Fermi level, the dispersive Fe 3d bands form several hole- and electron-like Fermi surfaces (FSs), some of which are quasi-nested by the (pi, 0) wave vector. This differs from the local density approximation (LDA) calculations, which predict non-nested FSs for this material. However, LDA+U with a large effective Hubbard energy U on V 3d electrons can reproduce the experimental observation reasonably well. The observed fermiology in superconducting Sr4V2O6Fe2As2 strongly supports that (pi, 0) interband scattering between quasi-nested FSs is indispensable to superconductivity in pnictides.