• Hi-GAL is a large-scale survey of the Galactic plane, performed with Herschel in five infrared continuum bands between 70 and 500 $\mu$m. We present a band-merged catalogue of spatially matched sources and their properties derived from fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and heliocentric distances, based on the photometric catalogs presented in Molinari et al. (2016a), covering the portion of Galactic plane $-71.0^{\circ}< \ell < 67.0^{\circ}$. The band-merged catalogue contains 100922 sources with a regular SED, 24584 of which show a 70 $\mu$m counterpart and are thus considered proto-stellar, while the remainder are considered starless. Thanks to this huge number of sources, we are able to carry out a preliminary analysis of early stages of star formation, identifying the conditions that characterise different evolutionary phases on a statistically significant basis. We calculate surface densities to investigate the gravitational stability of clumps and their potential to form massive stars. We also explore evolutionary status metrics such as the dust temperature, luminosity and bolometric temperature, finding that these are higher in proto-stellar sources compared to pre-stellar ones. The surface density of sources follows an increasing trend as they evolve from pre-stellar to proto-stellar, but then it is found to decrease again in the majority of the most evolved clumps. Finally, we study the physical parameters of sources with respect to Galactic longitude and the association with spiral arms, finding only minor or no differences between the average evolutionary status of sources in the fourth and first Galactic quadrants, or between "on-arm" and "inter-arm" positions.
  • We present the first data release of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Plane Survey (JPS), the JPS Public Release 1 (JPSPR1). JPS is an 850-um continuum survey of six fields in the northern inner Galactic Plane in a longitude range of l=7-63, made with the Sub-millimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2). This first data release consists of emission maps of the six JPS regions with an average pixel-to-pixel noise of 7.19 mJy beam^-1, when smoothed over the beam, and a compact-source catalogue containing 7,813 sources. The 95 per cent completeness limits of the catalogue are estimated at 0.04 Jy beam^-1 and 0.3 Jy for the peak and integrated flux densities, respectively. The emission contained in the compact-source catalogue is 42 +- 5 per cent of the total and, apart from the large-scale (greater than 8') emission, there is excellent correspondence with features in the 500-um Herschel maps. We find that, with two-dimensional matching, 98 +- 2 per cent of sources within the fields centred at l=20, 30, 40 and 50 are associated with molecular clouds, with 91 +- 3 per cent of the l=30 and 40 sources associated with dense molecular clumps. Matching the JPS catalogue to Herschel 70-um sources, we find that 38 +- 1 per cent of sources show evidence of ongoing star formation. The images and catalogue will be a valuable resource for studies of star formation in the Galaxy and the role of environment and spiral arms in the star formation process.
  • We present the physical and evolutionary properties of prestellar and protostellar clumps in the Herschel Infrared GALactic plane survey (Hi-GAL) in two large areas centered in the Galactic plane and covering the tips of the long Galactic bar at the intersection with the spiral arms. The areas fall in the longitude ranges 19 < l < 33 and 340 < l < 350, while latitude is -1 < b < 1. Newly formed high mass stars and prestellar objects are identified and their properties derived and compared. A study is also presented on five giant molecular complexes at the further edge of the bar. The star-formation rate was estimated from the quantity of proto-stars expected to form during the collapse of massive turbulent clumps into star clusters. This new method was developed by applying a Monte Carlo procedure to an evolutionary model of turbulent cores and takes into account the wide multiplicity of sources produced during the collapse. The star-formation rate density values at the tips are 1.2 +- 0.3 10-3 Msol/yr/kpc2 and 1.5+-0.3 10-3 Msol/yr/kpc2 in the first and fourth quadrant, respectively. The same values estimated on the entire field of view, that is including the tips of the bar and background and foreground regions, are 0.9+-0.2 10-3 Msol/yr/kpc2 and 0.8+-0.2 10-3 Msol/yr/kpc2. The conversion efficiency is approximately 0.8% in the first quadrant and 0.5% in the fourth quadrant, and does not show a significant difference in proximity of the bar. The star forming regions identified through CO contours at the further edge of the bar show star-formation rate densities larger than the surrounding regions but their conversion efficiencies are comparable. Our results suggest that the star-formation activity at the bar is due to a large amount of dust and molecular material rather than being due to a triggering process.
  • We present the results of the first complete unbaised survey of the Galactic Plane for 6035-MHz excited-state hydroxyl masers undertaken as part of the Methanol Multibeam Survey. These observations cover the Galactic longitude ranges $186^{\circ}< l < 60^{\circ}$ including the Galactic Centre. We report the detection of 127 excited-state hydroxyl masers within the survey region, 47 being new sources. The positions of new detections were determined from interferometric observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We discuss the association of 6035-MHz masers in our survey with the 6668-MHz masers from the MMB Survey, finding 37 likely methanol-excited-state hydroxyl masers maser pairs with physical separations of <=0.03pc and 55 pairings separated by <=0.1pc. Using these we calculate for the first time an excited-state hydroxyl maser life time of between 3.3x10^3 and 8.3x10^3 years. We also discuss the variability of the 6035-MHz masers and detection rates of counterpart 6030-MHz excited-state hydroxyl masers (28% of our sample having detection at both frequencies).
  • (Abridged) We present the first public release of high-quality data products (DR1) from Hi-GAL, the {\em Herschel} infrared Galactic Plane Survey. Hi-GAL is the keystone of a suite of continuum Galactic Plane surveys from the near-IR to the radio, and covers five wavebands at 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron, encompassing the peak of the spectral energy distribution of cold dust for 8 < T < 50K. This first Hi-GAL data release covers the inner Milky Way in the longitude range 68{\deg} > l > -70{\deg} in a |b|<1{\deg} latitude strip. Photometric maps have been produced with the ROMAGAL pipeline, that optimally capitalizes on the excellent sensitivity and stability of the bolometer arrays of the {\em Herschel} PACS and SPIRE photometric cameras, to deliver images of exquisite quality and dynamical range, absolutely calibrated with {\em Planck} and {\em IRAS}, and recovering extended emission at all wavelengths and all spatial scales. The compact source catalogues have been generated with the CuTEx algorithm, specifically developed to optimize source detection and extraction in the extreme conditions of intense and spatially varying background that are found in the Galactic Plane in the thermal infrared. Hi-GAL DR1 images will be accessible via a dedicated web-based image cutout service. The DR1 Compact Source Catalogues are delivered as single-band photometric lists containing, in addition to source position, peak and integrated flux and source sizes, a variety of parameters useful to assess the quality and reliability of the extracted sources, caveats and hints to help this assessment are provided. Flux completeness limits in all bands are determined from extensive synthetic source experiments and depend on the specific line of sight along the Galactic Plane. Hi-GAL DR1 catalogues contain 123210, 308509, 280685, 160972 and 85460 compact sources in the five bands, respectively.
  • The Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) is a proposed radio continuum survey of the Southern Hemisphere up to declination +30 deg., with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). EMU will use an automated source identification and measurement approach that is demonstrably optimal, to maximise the reliability, utility and robustness of the resulting radio source catalogues. As part of the process of achieving this aim, a "Data Challenge" has been conducted, providing international teams the opportunity to test a variety of source finders on a set of simulated images. The aim is to quantify the accuracy of existing automated source finding and measurement approaches, and to identify potential limitations. The Challenge attracted nine independent teams, who tested eleven different source finding tools. In addition, the Challenge initiators also tested the current ASKAPsoft source-finding tool to establish how it could benefit from incorporating successful features of the other tools. Here we present the results of the Data Challenge, identifying the successes and limitations for this broad variety of the current generation of radio source finding tools. As expected, most finders demonstrate completeness levels close to 100% at 10sigma dropping to levels around 10% by 5sigma. The reliability is typically close to 100% at 10sigma, with performance to lower sensitivities varying greatly between finders. All finders demonstrate the usual trade-off between completeness and reliability, whereby maintaining a high completeness at low signal-to-noise comes at the expense of reduced reliability, and vice-versa. We conclude with a series of recommendations for improving the performance of the ASKAPsoft source-finding tool.
  • We present early results from the JCMT Plane Survey (JPS), which has surveyed the northern inner Galactic plane between longitudes l=7 and l=63 degrees in the 850-{\mu}m continuum with SCUBA-2, as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Legacy Survey programme. Data from the l=30 degree survey region, which contains the massive star-forming regions W43 and G29.96, are analysed after approximately 40% of the observations had been completed. The pixel-to-pixel noise is found to be 19 mJy/beam, after a smooth over the beam area, and the projected equivalent noise levels in the final survey are expected to be around 10 mJy/beam. An initial extraction of compact sources was performed using the FellWalker method resulting in the detection of 1029 sources above a 5-{\sigma} surface-brightness threshold. The completeness limits in these data are estimated to be around 0.2 Jy/beam (peak flux density) and 0.8 Jy (integrated flux density) and are therefore probably already dominated by source confusion in this relatively crowded section of the survey. The flux densities of extracted compact sources are consistent with those of matching detections in the shallower ATLASGAL survey. We analyse the virial and evolutionary state of the detected clumps in the W43 star-forming complex and find that they appear younger than the Galactic-plane average.
  • Our goal is to identify bipolar HII regions and to understand their morphology, their evolution, and the role they play in the formation of new generations of stars. We use the Spitzer and Herschel Hi-GAL surveys to identify bipolar HII regions. We search for their exciting star(s) and estimate their distances using near-IR data. Dense clumps are detected using Herschel-SPIRE data. MALT90 observations allow us to ascertain their association with the central HII region. We identify Class 0/I YSOs using their Spitzer and Herschel-PACS emissions. These methods will be applied to the entire sample of candidate bipolar HII regions. This paper focuses on two bipolar HII regions, one interesting in terms of its morphology, G319.88$+$00.79, and one in terms of its star formation, G010.32$-$00.15. Their exciting clusters are identified and their photometric distances estimated to be 2.6 kpc and 1.75 kpc, respectively. We suggest that these regions formed in dense and flat structures that contain filaments. They have a central ionized region and ionized lobes perpendicular to the parental cloud. The remains of the parental cloud appear as dense (more than 10^4 per cm^3) and cold (14-17 K) condensations. The dust in the PDR is warm (19-25 K). Dense massive clumps are present around the central ionized region. G010.32-00.14 is especially remarkable because five clumps of several hundred solar masses surround the central HII region; their peak column density is a few 10^23 per cm^2, and the mean density in their central regions reaches several 10^5 per cm^3. Four of them contain at least one massive YSO; these clumps also contain extended green objects and Class II methanol masers. This morphology suggests that the formation of a second generation of massive stars has been triggered by the central bipolar HII region. It occurs in the compressed material of the parental cloud.
  • We present a continuing study of a sample 44 molecular outflows, observed in 13CO lines, closely associated with 6.7GHz methanol masers, hence called Methanol Maser Associated Outflows (MMAOs). We compare MMAO properties with those of outflows from other surveys in the literature. In general, MMAOs follow similar trends, but show a deficit in number at low masses and momenta, with a corresponding higher fraction at the high end of the distributions. A similar trend is seen for the dynamical timescales of MMAOs. We argue that the lack of relatively low mass and young flows in MMAOs is due to the inherent selection-bias in the sample, i.e. its direct association with 6.7GHz methanol masers. This implies that methanol masers must switch on after the onset of outflows (hence accretion), and not before a sufficient abundance of methanol is liberated from icy dust mantles. Consequently the average dynamical age of MMAOs is older than for the general population of molecular outflows. We propose an adjusted evolutionary sequence of outflow and maser occurrence in the hot core phase, where methanol masers turn on after the onset of the outflow phase.
  • Observations of molecular clouds reveal a complex structure, with gas and dust often arranged in filamentary rather than spherical geometries. The associations of pre- and proto- stellar cores with the filaments suggest a direct link with the process of star formation. Any study of the properties of such filaments requires a representative samples from different enviroments and so an unbiased detection method. We developed such an approach using the Hessian matrix of a surface-brightness distribution to identify filaments and determine their physical and morphological properties. After testing the method on simulated, but realistic filaments, we apply the algorithms to column-density maps computed from Herschel observations of the Galactic Plane obtained by the Hi-GAL project. We identified ~500 filaments, in the longitude range of l=216.5 to l=225.5, with lengths from ~1 pc up to ~30 pc and widths between 0.1 pc and 2.5 pc. Average column densities are between 10^20 cm^-2 and 10^22 cm^-2. Filaments include the majority of dense material with N_H_2 > 6x10^21cm^-2. We find that the pre- and proto-stellar compact sources already identified in the same region are mostly associated with filaments. However, surface densities in excess of the expected critical values for high-mass star formation are only found on the filaments, indicating that these structures are necessary to channel material into the clumps. Furthermore, we analyze the gravitational stability of filaments and discuss their relationship with star formation.
  • We present a study of the structure of the Galactic interstellar medium through the Delta-variance technique, related to the power spectrum and the fractal properties of infrared/sub-mm maps. Through this method, it is possible to provide quantitative parameters which are useful to characterize different morphological and physical conditions, and to better constrain the theoretical models. In this respect, the Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey carried out at five photometric bands from 70 to 500 \mu m constitutes an unique database for applying statistical tools to a variety of regions across the Milky Way. In this paper, we derive a robust estimate of the power-law portion of the power spectrum of four contiguous 2{\deg}x2{\deg} Hi-GAL tiles located in the third Galactic quadrant (217{\deg} < l < 225{\deg}, -2{\deg} < b < 0{\deg}). The low level of confusion along the line of sight testified by CO observations makes this region an ideal case. We find very different values of the power spectrum slope from tile to tile but also from wavelength to wavelength (2 < \beta < 3), with similarities between fields attributable to components located at the same distance. Thanks to the comparison with models of turbulence, an explanation of the determined slopes in terms of the fractal geometry is also provided, and possible relations with the underlying physics are investigated. In particular, an anti-correlation between ISM fractal dimension and star formation efficiency is found for the two main distance components observed in these fields. A possible link between the fractal properties of the diffuse emission and the resulting clump mass function is discussed.
  • We present the results of Herschel HOBYS photometric mapping combined with BIMA observations and additional archival data, and perform an in-depth study of the evolutionary phases of the star-forming clumps in W 48A and their surroundings. Age estimates for the compact sources were derived from bolometric luminosities and envelope masses, which were obtained from the dust continuum emission, and agree within an order of magnitude with age estimates from molecular line and radio data. The clumps in W 48A are linearly aligned by age (east-old to west-young): we find a ultra compact (UC) HII region, a young stellar object (YSO) with class II methanol maser emission, a YSO with a massive outflow, and finally the NH_2D prestellar cores from Pillai et al. This remarkable positioning reflects the (star) formation history of the region. We find that it is unlikely that the star formation in the W 48A molecular cloud was triggered by the UCHII region and discuss the Aquila supershell expansion as a mayor influence on the evolution of W 48A. We conclude that the combination of Herschel continuum data with interferometric molecular line and radio continuum data is important to derive trustworthy age estimates and interpret the origin of large scale structures through kinematic information.
  • We wish to investigate the structure, velocity field, and stellar content of the G16.59-0.05 high-mass star-forming region, where previous studies have established the presence of two almost perpendicular (NE-SW and SE-NW), massive outflows, and a rotating disk traced by methanol maser emission. We performed Very Large Array observations of the radio continuum and ammonia line emission, complemented by COMICS/Subaru and Hi-GAL/Herschel images in the mid- and far-infrared (IR). Our centimeter continuum maps reveal a collimated radio jet that is oriented E-W and centered on the methanol maser disk, placed at the SE border of a compact molecular core. The spectral index of the jet is negative, indicating non-thermal emission over most of the jet, except the peak close to the maser disk, where thermal free-free emission is observed. We find that the ammonia emission presents a bipolar structure consistent (on a smaller scale) in direction and velocity with that of the NE-SW bipolar outflow detected in previous CO observations. After analyzing our previous N2H+(1-0) observations again, we conclude that two scenarios are possible. In one case both the radio jet and the ammonia emission would trace the root of the large-scale CO bipolar outflow. The different orientation of the jet and the ammonia flow could be explained by precession and/or a non-isotropic density distribution around the star. In the other case, the N2H+(1-0) and ammonia bipolarity is interpreted as two overlapping clumps moving with different velocities along the line of sight. The ammonia gas also seems to undergo rotation consistent with the maser disk. Our IR images complemented by archival data allow us to derive a bolometric luminosity of about 10^4 L_sun and to conclude that most of the luminosity is due to the young stellar object associated with the maser disk.
  • Context. Stars form in dense, dusty clumps of molecular clouds, but little is known about their origin, their evolution and their detailed physical properties. In particular, the relationship between the mass distribution of these clumps (also known as the "clump mass function", or CMF) and the stellar initial mass function (IMF), is still poorly understood. Aims. In order to better understand how the CMF evolve toward the IMF, and to discern the "true" shape of the CMF, large samples of bona-fide pre- and proto-stellar clumps are required. Two such datasets obtained from the Herschel infrared GALactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) have been described in paper I. Robust statistical methods are needed in order to infer the parameters describing the models used to fit the CMF, and to compare the competing models themselves. Methods. In this paper we apply Bayesian inference to the analysis of the CMF of the two regions discussed in Paper I. First, we determine the Bayesian posterior probability distribution for each of the fitted parameters. Then, we carry out a quantitative comparison of the models used to fit the CMF. Results. We have compared the results from several methods implementing Bayesian inference, and we have also analyzed the impact of the choice of priors and the influence of various constraints on the statistical conclusions for the preferred values of the parameters. We find that both parameter estimation and model comparison depend on the choice of parameter priors. Conclusions. Our results confirm our earlier conclusion that the CMFs of the two Hi-GAL regions studied here have very similar shapes but different mass scales. Furthermore, the lognormal model appears to better describe the CMF measured in the two Hi-GAL regions studied here. However, this preliminary conclusion is dependent on the choice of parameters priors.
  • Maser lines from different molecular species, including water, hydroxyl, and methanol, are common observational phenomena associated with massive star forming regions. In particular, the methanol maser appears as an ideal tool to study the early phases of massive star formation. However, it is difficult to establish the exact start of the methanol maser phase, and it would then be interesting to detect and study low-flux density methanol masers (i.e., < 0.1 Jy or even << 0.1 Jy), in order to determine if they can effectively be used to mark a specific evolutionary phase in high-mass star formation. Past surveys have been unable to systematically detect many low-flux density methanol masers, and thus we do not yet know how many such masers exist in the Galaxy and what is their physical nature. Out of a sample of 107 observed Hi-GAL sources we detected a total of 32 methanol masers, with 22 sources being new and weak (median peak flux density 0.07 Jy) detections, in the Galactic longitude range [32.0, 59.8]deg. We also detected 12 6.035-GHz OH maser, with 9 objects being new detections. Our survey covers a similar range of source distances as the "Arecibo Methanol Maser Galactic Plane Survey", but the methanol masers detected by us are clearly shifted towards lower integrated flux densities. The newly detected methanol masers are mostly of low-luminosity and, except for some sources, their weakness is not due to distance effects or positional offsets. No specific correlation is found with the physical parameters of the Hi-GAL clumps, except for sources with both CH3OH and OH masers which tend to have higher mass and luminosity. The intensity of the methanol masers correlates well with the velocity range of the maser emission, which suggests that the low brightness of these masers is related to the number of maser spots in the emitting region and their evolution with time.
  • We present the Herschel Gould Belt survey maps of the L1641 molecular clouds in Orion A. We extracted both the filaments and dense cores in the region. We identified which of dense sources are proto- or pre-stellar, and studied their association with the identified filaments. We find that although most (71%) of the pre-stellar sources are located on filaments there is still a significant fraction of sources not associated with such structures. We find that these two populations (on and off the identified filaments) have distinctly different mass distributions. The mass distribution of the sources on the filaments is found to peak at 4 Solar masses and drives the shape of the CMF at higher masses, which we fit with a power law of the form dN/dlogM \propto M^{-1.4+/-0.4}. The mass distribution of the sources off the filaments, on the other hand, peaks at 0.8 Solar masses and leads to a flattening of the CMF at masses lower than ~4 Solar masses. We postulate that this difference between the mass distributions is due to the higher proportion of gas that is available in the filaments, rather than in the diffuse cloud.
  • We present the first Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations in a portion of the outer Galaxy ($216.5^{\circ} \lesssim \ell \lesssim 225.5^{\circ}$ and $-2^{\circ} \lesssim b \lesssim 0^{\circ}$) as a part of the Hi-GAL survey. The maps between 70 and 500 $\mu$m, the derived column density and temperature maps, and the compact source catalog are presented. NANTEN CO(1-0) line observations are used to derive cloud kinematics and distances, so that we can estimate distance-dependent physical parameters of the compact sources (cores and clumps) having a reliable spectral energy distribution, that we separate in 255 proto-stellar and 688 starless. Both typologies are found in association with all the distance components observed in the field, up to $\sim 5.8$ kpc, testifying the presence of star formation beyond the Perseus arm at these longitudes. Selecting the starless gravitationally bound sources we identify 590 pre-stellar candidates. Several sources of both proto- and pre-stellar nature are found to exceed the minimum requirement for being compatible with massive star formation, based on the mass-radius relation. For the pre-stellar sources belonging to the Local arm ($d\lesssim1.5$ kpc) we study the mass function, whose high-mass end shows a power-law $N(\log M) \propto M^{-1.0 \pm 0.2}$. Finally, we use a luminosity vs mass diagram to infer the evolutionary status of the sources, finding that most of the proto-stellar are in the early accretion phase (with some cases compatible with a Class I stage), while for pre-stellar sources, in general, accretion has not started yet.
  • We present a study of the star formation histories of the Lupus I, III, and IV clouds using the Herschel 70-500 micron maps obtained by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey Key Project. By combining the new Herschel data with the existing Spitzer catalog we obtained an unprecedented census of prestellar sources and young stellar objects in the Lupus clouds, which allowed us to study the overall star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE). The high SFE of Lupus III, its decreasing SFR, and its large number of pre-main sequence stars with respect to proto- and prestellar sources, suggest that Lupus III is the most evolved cloud, and after having experienced a major star formation event in the past, is now approaching the end of its current star-forming cycle. Lupus I is currently undergoing a large star formation event, apparent by the increasing SFR, the large number of prestellar objects with respect to more evolved objects, and the high percentage of material at high extinction (e.g., above A_V=8 mag). Also Lupus IV has an increasing SFR; however, the relative number of prestellar sources is much lower, suggesting that its star formation has not yet reached its peak.
  • The Herschel survey of the Galactic Plane (Hi-GAL) provides a unique opportunity to study star formation over large areas of the sky and different environments in the Milky Way. We use the best studied Hi-GAL fields to date, two 2x2 tiles centered on (l, b) = (30, 0) deg and (l, b) = (59, 0) deg, to study the star formation activity using a large sample of well selected young stellar objects (YSOs). We estimate the star formation rate (SFR) for these fields using the number of candidate YSOs and their average time scale to reach the Zero Age Main Sequence, and compare it with the rate estimated using their integrated luminosity at 70 micron combined with an extragalactic star formation indicator. We measure a SFR of (9.5 +- 4.3)*10^{-4} Msol/yr and (1.6 +- 0.7)*10^{-4} Msol/yr with the source counting method, in l=30 deg and l=59 deg, respectively. Results with the 70 micron estimator are (2.4 +- 0.4)*10^{-4} Msol/yr and (2.6 +- 1.1)*10^{-6} Msol/yr. Since the 70 micron indicator is derived from averaging extragalactic star forming complexes, we perform an extrapolation of these values to the whole Milky Way and obtain SFR_{MW} = (0.71 +- 0.13) Msol/yr from l = 30 deg and SFR_{MW} = (0.10 +- 0.04) Msol/yr from l=59 deg. The estimates in l=30 deg are in agreement with the most recent results on the Galactic star formation activity, indicating that the characteristics of this field are likely close to those of the star-formation dominated galaxies used for its derivation. Since the sky coverage is limited, this analysis will improve when the full Hi-GAL survey will be available.
  • We report far-IR Herschel observations obtained between 70 $\mu$m and 500 $\mu$m of two star-forming dusty condensations, B1-bS and B1-bN, in the B1 region of the Perseus star-forming cloud. In the Western part of the Perseus cloud, B1-bS is the only source detected in all of the 6 PACS and SPIRE photometric bands without being visible in the Spitzer map at 24 $\mu$m. B1-bN is clearly detected between 100 $\mu$m and 250 $\mu$m. We have fitted the spectral energy distributions of these sources to derive their physical properties, and find that a simple greybody model fails to reproduce the observed SEDs. At least a two-component model, consisting of a central source surrounded by a dusty envelope is required. The properties derived from the fit, however, suggest that the central source is not a Class 0 object. We then conclude that while B1-bS and B1-bN appear to be more evolved than a pre-stellar core, the best-fit models suggest that their central objects are younger than a Class 0 source. Hence, they may be good candidates to be examples of the first hydrostatic core phase. The projected distance between B1-bS and B1-bN is a few Jeans lengths. If their physical separation is close to this value, this pair would allow the mutual interactions between two forming stars at a very early stage of their evolution to be studied.
  • Stars form in dense, dusty clumps of molecular clouds, but little is known about their origin and evolution. In particular, the relationship between the mass distribution of these clumps (also known as the "clump mass function", or CMF) and the stellar initial mass function (IMF), is still poorly understood. In order to discern the "true" shape of the CMF and to better understand how the CMF may evolve toward the IMF, large samples of bona-fide pre- and proto-stellar clumps are required. The sensitive observations of the Herschel Space Observatory (HSO) are now allowing us to look at large clump populations in various clouds with different physical conditions. We analyse two fields in the Galactic plane mapped by HSO during its science demonstration phase, as part of the more complete and unbiased Herschel infrared GALactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL). These fields undergo a source-extraction and flux-estimation pipeline, which allows us to obtain a sample with thousands of clumps. Starless and proto-stellar clumps are separated using both color and positional criteria to find those coincident with MIPS 24 micron sources. We describe the probability density functions of the power-law and lognormal models that are used to fit the CMFs, and we then find their best-fit parameters. For the lognormal model we apply several statistical techniques to the data and compare their results. The CMFs of the two SDP fields show very similar shapes, but very different mass scales. This similarity is confirmed by the values of the best-fit parameters of either the power-law or lognormal model. The power-law model leads to almost identical CMF slopes, whereas the lognormal model shows that the CMFs have similar widths. The similar CMF shape but different mass scale represents an evidence that the overall process of star formation in the two regions is very different.
  • The conversion of gas into stars is a fundamental process in astrophysics and cosmology. Stars are known to form from the gravitational collapse of dense clumps in interstellar molecular clouds, and it has been proposed that the resulting star formation rate is proportional to either the amount of mass above a threshold gas surface density, or the gas volume density. These star-formation prescriptions appear to hold in nearby molecular clouds in our Milky Way Galaxy's disk as well as in distant galaxies where the star formation rates are often much larger. The inner 500 pc of our Galaxy, the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), contains the largest concentration of dense, high-surface density molecular gas in the Milky Way, providing an environment where the validity of star-formation prescriptions can be tested. Here we show that by several measures, the current star formation rate in the CMZ is an order-of-magnitude lower than the rates predicted by the currently accepted prescriptions. In particular, the region 1 deg < l < 3.5 deg, |b| < 0.5 deg contains ~10^7 Msun of dense molecular gas -- enough to form 1000 Orion-like clusters -- but the present-day star formation rate within this gas is only equivalent to that in Orion. In addition to density, another property of molecular clouds, such as the amplitude of turbulent motions, must be included in the star-formation prescription to predict the star formation rate in a given mass of molecular gas.
  • We present a Herschel far-infrared study towards the rich massive star- forming complex G305, utilising PACS 70, 160 {\mu}m and SPIRE 250, 350, and 500 {\mu}m observations from the Hi-GAL survey of the Galactic plane. The focus of this study is to identify the embedded massive star-forming population within G305, by combining far-infrared data with radio continuum, H2O maser, methanol maser, MIPS, and Red MSX Source survey data available from previous studies. By applying a frequentist technique we are able to identify a sample of the most likely associations within our multi-wavelength dataset, that can then be identified from the derived properties obtained from fitted spectral energy distributions (SEDs). By SED modelling using both a simple modified blackbody and fitting to a comprehensive grid of model SEDs, some 16 candidate associations are identified as embedded massive star-forming regions. We derive a two-selection colour criterion from this sample of log(F70/F500)\geq 1 and log(F160/F350)\geq 1.6 to identify an additional 31 embedded massive star candidates with no associated star-formation tracers. Using this result we can build a picture of the present day star-formation of the complex, and by extrapolating an initial mass function, suggest a current population of \approx 2 \times 10^4 young stellar objects (YSOs) present, corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR) of 0.01-0.02 M\odot yr^-1. Comparing this resolved star formation rate, to extragalactic star formation rate tracers (based on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation), we find the star formation activity is underestimated by a factor of \geq 2 in comparison to the SFR derived from the YSO population.
  • In a previous paper we identified cores within infrared dark clouds (IRDCs). We regarded those without embedded sources as the least evolved, and labelled them starless. Here we identify the most isolated starless cores and model them using a three-dimensional, multi-wavelength, Monte Carlo, radiative transfer code. We derive the cores' physical parameters and discuss the relation between the mass, temperature, density, size and the surrounding interstellar radiation field (ISRF) for the cores. The masses of the cores were found not to correlate with their radial size or central density. The temperature at the surface of a core was seen to depend almost entirely on the level of the ISRF surrounding the core. No correlation was found between the temperature at the centre of a core and its local ISRF. This was seen to depend, instead, on the density and mass of the core.
  • For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peaked PDF we interprete as caused by shock compression. The deviations of the PDF from the log-normal shape typically associated with low- and high-mass star-forming regions at Av~3-4m and 8-10m, respectively, are found here within the very same cloud. This shows that there is no fundamental difference in the density structure of low- and high-mass star-forming regions. We conclude that star-formation in Rosette - and probably in high-mass star-forming clouds in general - is not globally triggered by the impact of UV-radiation. Moreover, star formation takes place in filaments that arose from the primordial turbulent structure built up during the formation of the cloud. Clusters form at filament mergers, but star formation can be locally induced in the direct interaction zone between an expanding HII--region and the molecular cloud.