• We introduce a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dot architecture based on a single polysilicon gate stack. The elementary structure consists of two enhancement gates separated spatially by a gap, one gate forming a reservoir and the other a quantum dot. We demonstrate, in three devices based on two different versions of this elementary structure, that a wide range of tunnel rates is attainable while maintaining single-electron occupation. A characteristic change in slope of the charge transitions as a function of the reservoir gate voltage, attributed to screening from charges in the reservoir, is observed in all devices, and is expected to play a role in the sizable tuning orthogonality of the split enhancement gate structure. The all-silicon process is expected to minimize strain gradients from electrode thermal mismatch, while the single gate layer should avoid issues related to overlayers (e.g., additional dielectric charge noise) and help improve yield. Finally, reservoir gate control of the tunnel barrier has implications for initialization, manipulation and readout schemes in multi-quantum dot architectures.
  • We demonstrate fast universal electrical spin manipulation with inhomogeneous magnetic fields. With fast Rabi frequency up to 127 MHz, we leave the conventional regime of strong nuclear-spin influence and observe a spin-flip fidelity > 96%, a distinct chevron Rabi pattern in the spectral-time domain, and spin resonance linewidth limited by the Rabi frequency, not by the dephasing rate. In addition, we establish fast z-rotations up to 54 MHz by directly controlling the spin phase. Our findings will significantly facilitate tomography and error correction with electron spins in quantum dots.
  • Tunneling in a quantum coherent structure is not restricted to only nearest neighbours. Hopping between distant sites is possible via the virtual occupation of otherwise avoided intermediate states. Here we report the observation of long range transitions in the transport through three quantum dots coupled in series. A single electron is delocalized between the left and right quantum dots while the centre one remains always empty. Superpositions are formed and both charge and spin are exchanged between the outermost dots. Detection of the process is achieved via the observation of narrow resonances, insensitive to the transport Pauli spin blockade.
  • Spin qubits based on interacting spins in double quantum dots have been successfully demonstrated. Readout of the qubit state involves a conversion of spin to charge information, universally achieved by taking advantage of a spin blockade phenomenon resulting from Pauli's exclusion principle. The archetypal spin blockade transport signature in double quantum dots takes the form of a rectified current. Currently more complex spin qubit circuits including triple quantum dots are being developed. Here we show both experimentally and theoretically (a) that in a linear triple quantum dot circuit, the spin blockade becomes bipolar with current strongly suppressed in both bias directions and (b) that a new quantum coherent mechanism becomes relevant. Within this mechanism charge is transferred non-intuitively via coherent states from one end of the linear triple dot circuit to the other without involving the centre site. Our results have implications in future complex nano-spintronic circuits.
  • Spin qubits involving individual spins in single quantum dots or coupled spins in double quantum dots have emerged as potential building blocks for quantum information processing applications. It has been suggested that triple quantum dots may provide additional tools and functionalities. These include the encoding of information to either obtain protection from decoherence or to permit all-electrical operation, efficient spin busing across a quantum circuit, and to enable quantum error correction utilizing the three-spin Greenberger-Horn-Zeilinger quantum state. Towards these goals we demonstrate for the first time coherent manipulation between two interacting three-spin states. We employ the Landau-Zener-St\"uckelberg approach for creating and manipulating coherent superpositions of quantum states. We confirm that we are able to maintain coherence when decreasing the exchange coupling of one spin with another while simultaneously increasing its coupling with the third. Such control of pairwise exchange is a requirement of most spin qubit architectures but has not been previously demonstrated.
  • A crucial requirement for quantum information processing is the realization of multiple-qubit quantum gates. Here, we demonstrate an electron spin based all-electrical two-qubit gate consisting of single spin rotations and inter-dot spin exchange in a double quantum dot. A partially entangled output state is obtained by the application of the two-qubit gate to an initial, uncorrelated state. We find that the degree of entanglement is controllable by the exchange operation time. The approach represents a key step towards the realization of universal multiple qubit gates.
  • We measure a triple quantum dot in the regime where three addition lines, corresponding to the addition of an electron to each of three dots, pass through each other. In particular, we probe the interplay between transport and the tridimensional nature of the stability diagram. We choose the regime most pertinent for spin qubit applications. We find that at low bias transport through the triple quantum dot circuit is only possible at six quadruple point locations. The results are consistent with an equivalent circuit model.
  • The rapidly rising fields of spintronics and quantum information science have led to a strong interest in developing the ability to coherently manipulate electron spins. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a powerful technique to manipulate spins that is commonly achieved by applying an oscillating magnetic field. However, the technique has proven very challenging when addressing individual spins. In contrast, by mixing the spin and charge degrees of freedom in a controlled way through engineered non-uniform magnetic fields, electron spin can be manipulated electrically without the need of high-frequency magnetic fields. Here we realize electrically-driven addressable spin rotations on two individual electrons by integrating a micron-size ferromagnet to a double quantum dot device. We find that the electrical control and spin selectivity is enabled by the micro-magnet's stray magnetic field which can be tailored to multi-dots architecture. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating electron spins electrically in a scalable way.
  • Charge detection utilizing a highly biased quantum point contact has become the most effective probe for studying few electron quantum dot circuits. Measurements on double and triple quantum dot circuits is performed to clarify a back action role of charge sensing on the confined electrons. The quantum point contact triggers inelastic transitions, which occur quite generally. Under specific device and measurement conditions these transitions manifest themselves as bounded regimes of telegraph noise within a stability diagram. A nonequilibrium transition from artificial atomic to molecular behavior is identified. Consequences for quantum information applications are discussed.
  • Magnetically coupling a nano-mechanical resonator to a double quantum dot confining two electrons can enable the manipulation of a single electron spin and the readout of the resonator's natural frequency. When the Larmor frequency matches the resonator frequency, the electron spin in one of the dots can be selectively flipped by the magnetised resonator. By simultaneously measuring the charge state of the two-electron double quantum dots, this transition can be detected thus enabling the natural frequency of the mechanical resonator to be determined.
  • A lateral quantum dot design for coherent electrical manipulation of a two-level spin-charge system is presented. Two micron-size permanent magnets integrated to high-frequency electrodes produce a static slanting magnetic field suitable for voltage controlled single qubit gate operations. Stray field deviation from the slanting form is taken into account in the Hamiltonian describing the two-level system, which involves hybridization of a single electron spin to the quantum dot's orbitals. Operation speed and gate fidelity are related to device parameters. Sub 100 ns $\pi$ pulse duration can be achieved with lattice fluctuations coherence time of 4 ms for GaAs.
  • We report charge detection studies of a lateral double quantum dot with controllable charge states and tunable tunnel coupling. Using an integrated electrometer, we characterize the equilibrium state of a single electron trapped in the doubled-dot (artificial H2+ molecule) by measuring the average occupation of one dot. We present a model where the electrostatic coupling between the molecule and the sensor is taken into account explicitly. From the measurements, we extract the temperature of the isolated electron and the tunnel coupling energy. It is found that this coupling can be tuned between 0 and 60 micro electron-volt in our device.
  • We have studied the origin of switching (telegraph) noise at low temperature in lateral quantum structures defined electrostatically in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures by surface gates. The noise was measured by monitoring the conductance fluctuations around $e^2/h$ on the first step of a quantum point contact at around 1.2 K. Cooling with a positive bias on the gates dramatically reduces this noise, while an asymmetric bias exacerbates it. We propose a model in which the noise originates from a leakage current of electrons that tunnel through the Schottky barrier under the gate into the doped layer. The key to reducing noise is to keep this barrier opaque under experimental conditions. Bias cooling reduces the density of ionized donors, which builds in an effective negative gate voltage. A smaller negative bias is therefore needed to reach the desired operating point. This suppresses tunnelling from the gate and hence the noise. The reduction in the density of ionized donors also strengthens the barrier to tunneling at a given applied voltage. Support for the model comes from our direct observation of the leakage current into a closed quantum dot, around $10^{-20} \mathrm{A}$ for this device. The current was detected by a neighboring quantum point contact, which showed monotonic steps in time associated with the tunneling of single electrons into the dot. If asymmetric gate voltages are applied, our model suggests that the noise will increase as a consequence of the more negative gate voltage applied to one of the gates to maintain the same device conductance. We observe exactly this behaviour in our experiments.
  • Novel hysteretic effects are reported in magneto-transport experiments on lateral quantum devices. The effects are characterized by two vastly different relaxation times (minutes and days). It is shown that the observed phenomena are related to long-lived eddy currents. This is confirmed by torsion-balance magnetometry measurements of the same 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) material. These observations show that the induced quantum Hall potential at the edges of the 2DEG reservoirs influences transport through the devices, and have important consequences for the magneto-transport of all lateral quantum devices.
  • We present Coulomb Blockade measurements of two few-electron quantum dots in series which are configured such that the electrochemical potential of one of the two dots is aligned with spin-selective leads. The charge transfer through the system requires co-tunneling through the second dot which is $not$ in resonance with the leads. The observed amplitude modulation of the resulting current is found to reflect spin blockade events occurring through either of the two dots. We also confirm that charge redistribution events occurring in the off-resonance dot are detected indirectly via changes in the electrochemical potential of the aligned dot.
  • Coulomb and spin blockade spectroscopy investigations have been performed on an electrostatically defined ``artificial molecule'' connected to spin polarized leads. The molecule is first effectively reduced to a two-level system by placing both constituent atoms at a specific location of the level spectrum. The spin sensitivity of the conductance enables us to identify the electronic spin-states of the two-level molecule. We find in addition that the magnetic field induces variations in the tunnel coupling between the two atoms. The lateral nature of the device is evoked to explain this behavior.
  • Results of calculations and high source-drain transport measurements are presented which demonstrate voltage-tunable entanglement of electron pairs in lateral quantum dots. At a fixed magnetic field, the application of a judiciously-chosen gate voltage alters the ground-state of an electron pair from an entagled spin singlet to a spin triplet.
  • We present experimental and theoretical results on a new regime in quantum dots in which the filling factor 2 singlet state is replaced by new spin polarized phases. We make use of spin blockade spectroscopy to identify the transition to this new regime as a function of the number of electrons. The key experimental observation is a reversal of the phase in the systematic oscillation of the amplitude of Coulomb blockade peaks as the number of electrons is increased above a critical number. It is found theoretically that correlations are crucial to the existence of the new phases.
  • We demonstrate a tunable negative differential resistance controlled by spin blockade in single electron transistors. The single electron transistors containing a few electrons and spin polarized source and drain contacts were formed in GaAs/GaAlAs heterojunctions using metallic gates. Coulomb blockade measurements performed as a function of applied source-drain bias, electron number and magnetic field reveal well defined regimes where a decrease in the current is observed with increasing bias. We establish that the origin of the negative differential regime is the spin-polarized detection of electrons combined with a long spin relaxation time in the dot. These results indicate new functionalities that may be utilized in nano-spintronic devices in which the spin state is electro-statically controlled via the electron occupation number.
  • We calculate the spectral weight of the one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models, by performing exact diagonalizations of finite clusters and treating inter-cluster hopping with perturbation theory. Even with relatively modest clusters (e.g. 12 sites), the spectra thus obtained give an accurate description of the exact results. Thus, spin-charge separation (i.e. an extended spectral weight bounded by singularities) is clearly recognized in the one-dimensional Hubbard model, and so is extended spectral weight in the two-dimensional Hubbard model.