• Debris disks are the intrinsic by-products of the star and planet formation processes. Most likely due to instrumental limitations and their natural faintness, little is known about debris disks around low-mass stars, especially when it comes to spatially resolved observations. We present new VLT/SPHERE IRDIS Dual-Polarization Imaging (DPI) observations in which we detect the dust ring around the M2 spectral type star TWA\,7. Combined with additional Angular Differential Imaging observations we aim at a fine characterization of the debris disk and setting constraints on the presence of low-mass planets. We model the SPHERE DPI observations and constrain the location of the small dust grains, as well as the spectral energy distribution of the debris disk, using the results inferred from the observations, and perform simple N-body simulations. We find that the dust density distribution peaks at 25 au, with a very shallow outer power-law slope, and that the disk has an inclination of 13 degrees with a position angle of 90 degrees East of North. We also report low signal-to-noise detections of an outer belt at a distance of ~52 au from the star, of a spiral arm in the Southern side of the star, and of a possible dusty clump at 3.9 au. These findings seem to persist over timescales of at least a year. Using the intensity images, we do not detect any planets in the close vicinity of the star, but the sensitivity reaches Jovian planet mass upper limits. We find that the SED is best reproduced with an inner disk at 7 au and another belt at 25 au. We report the detections of several unexpected features in the disk around TWA\,7. A yet undetected 100 M$_\oplus$ planet with a semi-major axis at 20-30 au could possibly explain the outer belt as well as the spiral arm. We conclude that stellar winds are unlikely to be responsible for the spiral arm.
  • DZ Cha is a weak-lined T Tauri star (WTTS) surrounded by a bright protoplanetary disc with evidence of inner disc clearing. Its narrow $\Ha$ line and infrared spectral energy distribution suggest that DZ Cha may be a photoevaporating disc. We aim to analyse the DZ Cha star + disc system to identify the mechanism driving the evolution of this object. We have analysed three epochs of high resolution optical spectroscopy, photometry from the UV up to the sub-mm regime, infrared spectroscopy, and J-band imaging polarimetry observations of DZ Cha. Combining our analysis with previous studies we find no signatures of accretion in the $\Ha$ line profile in nine epochs covering a time baseline of $\sim20$ years. The optical spectra are dominated by chromospheric emission lines, but they also show emission from the forbidden lines [SII] 4068 and [OI] 6300$\,\AA$ that indicate a disc outflow. The polarized images reveal a dust depleted cavity of $\sim7$ au in radius and two spiral-like features, and we derive a disc dust mass limit of $M_\mathrm{dust}<3\MEarth$ from the sub-mm photometry. No stellar ($M_\star > 80 \MJup$) companions are detected down to $0\farcs07$ ($\sim 8$ au, projected). The negligible accretion rate, small cavity, and forbidden line emission strongly suggests that DZ Cha is currently at the initial stages of disc clearing by photoevaporation. At this point the inner disc has drained and the inner wall of the truncated outer disc is directly exposed to the stellar radiation. We argue that other mechanisms like planet formation or binarity cannot explain the observed properties of DZ Cha. The scarcity of objects like this one is in line with the dispersal timescale ($\lesssim 10^5$ yr) predicted by this theory. DZ Cha is therefore an ideal target to study the initial stages of photoevaporation.
  • We present high precision, model independent, mass and radius measurements for 16 white dwarfs in detached eclipsing binaries and combine these with previously published data to test the theoretical white dwarf mass-radius relationship. We reach a mean precision of 2.4 per cent in mass and 2.7 per cent in radius, with our best measurements reaching a precision of 0.3 per cent in mass and 0.5 per cent in radius. We find excellent agreement between the measured and predicted radii across a wide range of masses and temperatures. We also find the radii of all white dwarfs with masses less than 0.48M$_\odot$ to be fully consistent with helium core models, but they are on average 9 per cent larger than those of carbon-oxygen core models. In contrast, white dwarfs with masses larger than 0.52M$_\odot$ all have radii consistent with carbon-oxygen core models. Moreover, we find that all but one of the white dwarfs in our sample have radii consistent with possessing thick surface hydrogen envelopes ($10^{-5} \ge M_\mathrm{H}/M_\mathrm{WD} \ge 10^{-4}$), implying that the surface hydrogen layers of these white dwarfs are not obviously affected by common envelope evolution.
  • We present HST spectroscopy for 45 cataclysmic variables (CVs), observed with HST/COS and HST/STIS. For 36 CVs, the white dwarf is recognisable through its broad Ly$\alpha$ absorption profile and we measure the white dwarf effective temperatures ($T_{\mathrm{eff}}$) by fitting the HST data assuming $\log\,g=8.35$, which corresponds to the average mass for CV white dwarfs ($\simeq\,0.8\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$). Our results nearly double the number of CV white dwarfs with an accurate temperature measurement. We find that CVs above the period gap have, on average, higher temperatures ($\langle T_{\mathrm{eff}} \rangle \simeq 23\,000\,$K) and exhibit much more scatter compared to those below the gap ($\langle T_{\mathrm{eff}} \rangle \simeq 15\,000\,$K). While this behaviour broadly agrees with theoretical predictions, some discrepancies are present: (i) all our new measurements above the gap are characterised by lower temperatures ($T_{\mathrm{eff}} \simeq 16\,000 - 26\,000\,$K) than predicted by the present day CV population models ($T_{\mathrm{eff}} \simeq 38\,000 - 43\,000\,$K); (ii) our results below the gap are not clustered in the predicted narrow track and exhibit in particular a relatively large spread near the period minimum, which may point to some shortcomings in the CV evolutionary models. Finally, in the standard model of CV evolution, reaching the minimum period, CVs are expected to evolve back towards longer periods with mean accretion rates $\dot{M}\lesssim 2 \times 10^{-11}\,\mathrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$, corresponding to $T_\mathrm{eff}\lesssim 11\,500\,$K. We do not unambiguously identify any such system in our survey, suggesting that this major component of the predicted CV population still remains elusive to observations.
  • The large cavities observed in the dust and gas distributions of transition disks may be explained by planet-disk interactions. At ~145 pc, 2MASS J16042165-2130284 (J1604) is a 5-12 Myr old transitional disk with different gap sizes in the mm- and $\mu$m-sized dust distributions (outer edges at ~79 and at ~63 au, respectively). Its $^{12}$CO emission shows a ~30 au cavity. This radial structure suggests that giant planets are sculpting this disk. We aim to constrain the masses and locations of plausible giant planets around J1604. We observed J1604 with the Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (SPHERE) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), in IRDIFS\_EXT, pupil-stabilized mode, obtaining YJH- band images with the integral field spectrograph (IFS) and K1K2-band images with the Infra-Red Dual-beam Imager and Spectrograph (IRDIS). The dataset was processed exploiting the angular differential imaging (ADI) technique with high-contrast algorithms. Our observations reach a contrast of $\Delta K, YH$ ~12 mag from 0.15" to 0.80" (~22 to 115 au), but no planet candidate is detected. The disk is directly imaged in scattered light at all bands from Y to K, and it shows a red color. This indicates that the dust particles in the disk surface are mainly $\gtrsim0.3\,\mu$m-sized grains. We confirm the sharp dip/decrement in scattered light in agreement with polarized light observations. Comparing our images with a radiative transfer model we argue that the southern side of the disk is most likely the nearest. This work represents the deepest search yet for companions around J1604. We reach a mass sensitivity of $\gtrsim 2-3M_{Jup}$ from ~22 to ~115 au according to a hot start scenario. We propose that a brown dwarf orbiting inside of ~15 au and additional Jovian planets at larger radii could account for the observed properties of J1604 while explaining our lack of detection.
  • The number of spatially unresolved white dwarf plus main-sequence star binaries has increased rapidly in the last decade, jumping from only ~30 in 2003 to over 3000. However, in the majority of known systems the companion to the white dwarf is a low mass M dwarf, since these are relatively easy to identify from optical colours and spectra. White dwarfs with more massive FGK type companions have remained elusive due to the large difference in optical brightness between the two stars. In this paper we identify 934 main-sequence FGK stars from the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey in the southern hemisphere and the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey in the northern hemisphere, that show excess flux at ultraviolet wavelengths which we interpret as the likely presence of a white dwarf companion. We obtained Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra for nine systems which confirmed that the excess is indeed caused, in all cases, by a hot compact companion, eight being white dwarfs and one a hot subdwarf or pre-helium white dwarf, demonstrating that this sample is very clean. We also address the potential of this sample to test binary evolution models and type Ia supernovae formation channels.
  • Debris disks offer valuable insights into the latest stages of circumstellar disk evolution, and can possibly help us to trace the outcomes of planetary formation processes. In the age range 10 to 100\,Myr, most of the gas is expected to have been removed from the system, giant planets (if any) must have already been formed, and the formation of terrestrial planets may be on-going. Pluto-sized planetesimals, and their debris released in a collisional cascade, are under their mutual gravitational influence, which may result into non-axisymmetric structures in the debris disk. High angular resolution observations are required to investigate these effects and constrain the dynamical evolution of debris disks. Furthermore, multi-wavelength observations can provide information about the dust dynamics by probing different grain sizes. Here we present new VLT/SPHERE and ALMA observations of the debris disk around the 40\,Myr-old solar-type star HD\,61005. We resolve the disk at unprecedented resolution both in the near-infrared (in scattered and polarized light) and at millimeter wavelengths. Thanks to the new observations, we propose a solution for both the radial and azimuthal distribution of the dust grains in the debris disk. We find that the disk has a moderate eccentricity ($e \sim 0.1$) and that the dust density is two times larger at the pericenter compared to the apocenter. With no giant planets detected in our observations, we investigate alternative explanations besides planet-disk interactions to interpret the inferred disk morphology. We postulate that the morphology of the disk could be the consequence of a massive collision between $\sim$\,1000\,km-sized bodies at $\sim$\,61\,au. If this interpretation holds, it would put stringent constraints on the formation of massive planetesimals at large distances from the star.
  • Non-radial pulsations have been identified in a number of accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables. These stars offer insight into the excitation of pulsation modes in atmospheres with mixed compositions of hydrogen, helium, and metals, and the response of these modes to changes in the white dwarf temperature. Among all pulsating cataclysmic variable white dwarfs, GW Librae stands out by having a well-established observational record of three independent pulsation modes that disappeared when the white dwarf temperature rose dramatically following its 2007 accretion outburst. Our analysis of HST ultraviolet spectroscopy taken in 2002, 2010 and 2011, showed that pulsations produce variations in the white dwarf effective temperature as predicted by theory. Additionally in May~2013, we obtained new HST/COS ultraviolet observations that displayed unexpected behaviour: besides showing variability at ~275s, which is close to the post-outburst pulsations detected with HST in 2010 and 2011, the white dwarf exhibits high-amplitude variability on a ~4.4h time-scale. We demonstrate that this variability is produced by an increase of the temperature of a region on white dwarf covering up to ~30 per cent of the visible white dwarf surface. We argue against a short-lived accretion episode as the explanation of such heating, and discuss this event in the context of non-radial pulsations on a rapidly rotating star
  • We present high speed photometry and high resolution spectroscopy of the eclipsing post common envelope binary QS Virginis (QS Vir). Our UVES spectra span multiple orbits over more than a year and reveal the presence of several large prominences passing in front of both the M star and its white dwarf companion, allowing us to triangulate their positions. Despite showing small variations on a timescale of days, they persist for more than a year and may last decades. One large prominence extends almost three stellar radii from the M star. Roche tomography reveals that the M star is heavily spotted and that these spots are long-lived and in relatively fixed locations, preferentially found on the hemisphere facing the white dwarf. We also determine precise binary and physical parameters for the system. We find that the 14,220 +/- 350K white dwarf is relatively massive, 0.782 +/- 0.013Ms, and has a radius of 0.01068 +/- 0.00007Rs, consistent with evolutionary models. The tidally distorted M star has a mass of 0.382 +/- 0.006Ms and a radius of 0.381 +/- 0.003Rs, also consistent with evolutionary models. We find that the magnesium absorption line from the white dwarf is broader than expected. This could be due to rotation (implying a spin period of only ~700 seconds), or due to a weak (~100kG) magnetic field, we favour the latter interpretation. Since the M star's radius is still within its Roche lobe and there is no evidence that its over-inflated we conclude that QS Vir is most likely a pre-cataclysmic binary just about to become semi-detached.
  • Models of planet formation and disc evolution predict a variety of observables in the dust structure of protoplanetary discs. Here we present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Band-6 and Band-7 observations of the transition disc Sz\,91 showing that the continuum emission at 870$\mu$m, which is dominated by emission from large dust grains, is localized in an optically thin narrow ring. We find that most of the emission ($\sim95\%$) is concentrated in a ring located at 110 au from the central star that is only about 44 au wide. In contrast, the $^{12}\mathrm{CO}$ (2-1) emission peaks closer to the star and is detected up to $\sim488$ au from the star. The concentration of large grains in a ring-like structure while the gas disc extends much further in and further out is in qualitative agreement with predictions of hydrodynamical models of planet-disc interactions including radial drift and gas drag.
  • The evolution of a circumstellar disk from its gas-rich protoplanetary stage to its gas-poor debris stage is not understood well. It is apparent that disk clearing progresses from the inside-out on a short time scale and models of photoevaporation are frequently used to explain this. However, the photoevaporation rates predicted by models differ by up to two orders of magnitude, resulting in uncertain time scales for the final stages of disk clearing. Photoevaporation theories predict that the final stages of disk-clearing progress in objects that have ceased accretion but still posses considerable material at radii far from the star. Weak-line T Tauri stars (WTTS) with infrared excess are likely in this configuration. We aim to provide observational constraints on theories of disk-clearing by measuring the dust masses and CO content of a sample of young (1.8-26.3 Myr) WTTS. We used ALMA Band 6 to obtain continuum and 12 CO(2-1) line fluxes for a sample of 24 WTTS stars with known infrared excess. We detect continuum emission in only four of 24 WTTS, and no 12 CO(2-1) emission in any. For those WTTS where no continuum was detected, their ages and derived upper limits suggest they are debris disks, which makes them some of the youngest debris disks known. Of those where continuum was detected, three are possible photoevaporating disks, although the lack of CO detection suggests a severely reduced gas-to-dust ratio. The low fraction of continuum detections implies that, once accretion onto the star stops, the clearing of the majority of dust progresses very rapidly. Most WTTS with infrared excess are likely not in transition but are instead young debris disks, whose dust is either primordial and has survived disk-clearing, or is of second-generation origin.
  • We report the discovery of an extremely close white dwarf plus F dwarf main-sequence star in a 12 hour binary identified by combining data from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) survey. A combination of spectral energy distribution fitting and optical and Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectroscopy allowed us to place fairly precise constraints on the physical parameters of the binary. The system, TYC 6760-497-1, consists of a hot Teff~20,000K, M~0.6Ms white dwarf and an F8 star (M~1.23Ms, R~1.3Rs) seen at a low inclination (i~37 deg). The system is likely the descendent of a binary that contained the F star and a ~2Ms A-type star that filled its Roche-lobe on the thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch, initiating a common envelope phase. The F star is extremely close to Roche-lobe filling and there is likely to be a short phase of thermal timescale mass-transfer onto the white dwarf during which stable hydrogen burning occurs. During this phase it will grow in mass by up to 20 per cent, until the mass ratio reaches close to unity, at which point it will appear as a standard cataclysmic variable star. Therefore, TYC 6760-497-1 is the first known progenitor of a super-soft source system, but will not undergo a supernova Ia explosion. Once an accurate distance to the system is determined by Gaia, we will be able to place very tight constraints on the stellar and binary parameters.
  • We present an analysis of the binary and physical parameters of a unique pulsating white dwarf with a main-sequence companion, SDSS J1136+0409, observed for more than 77 d during the first pointing of the extended Kepler mission: K2 Campaign 1. Using new ground-based spectroscopy, we show that this post-common-envelope binary has an orbital period of 6.89760103(60) hr, which is also seen in the photometry as a result of Doppler beaming and ellipsoidal variations of the secondary. We spectroscopically refine the temperature of the white dwarf to 12330(260) K and its mass to 0.601(36) Msun. We detect seven independent pulsation modes in the K2 light curve. A preliminary asteroseismic solution is in reasonable agreement with the spectroscopic atmospheric parameters. Three of the pulsation modes are clearly rotationally split multiplets, which we use to demonstrate that the white dwarf is not synchronously rotating with the orbital period but has a rotation period of 2.49(53) hr. This is faster than any known isolated white dwarf, but slower than almost all white dwarfs measured in non-magnetic cataclysmic variables, the likely future state of this binary.
  • We present ALMA (Cycle 0) band-6 and band-3 observations of the transition disk Sz\,91. The disk inclination and position angle are determined to be $i=49.5\degr\pm3.5\degr$ and $\mathrm{PA}=18.2\degr\pm3.5\degr$ and the dusty and gaseous disk are detected up to $\sim220$ au and $\sim400$ au from the star, respectively. Most importantly, our continuum observations indicate that the cavity size in the mm-sized dust distribution must be $\sim97$ au in radius, the largest cavity observed around a T Tauri star. Our data clearly confirms the presence of \co(2-1) well inside the dust cavity. Based on these observational constrains we developed a disk model that simultaneously accounts for the \co and continuum observations (i.e., gaseous and dusty disk). According to our model, most of the millimeter emission comes from a ring located between 97 and 140 au. We also find that the dust cavity is divided into an innermost region largely depleted of dust particles ranging from the dust sublimation radius up to 85 au, and a second, moderately dust-depleted region, extending from 85 to 97 au. The extremely large size of the dust cavity, the presence of gas and small dust particles within the cavity and the accretion rate of Sz\,91 are consistent with the formation of multiple (giant) planets.
  • We report on the search for new eclipsing white dwarf plus main-sequence (WDMS) binaries in the light curves of the Catalina surveys. We use a colour selected list of almost 2000 candidate WDMS systems from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, specifically designed to identify WDMS systems with cool white dwarfs and/or early M type main-sequence stars. We identify a total of 17 eclipsing systems, 14 of which are new discoveries. We also find 3 candidate eclipsing systems, 2 main-sequence eclipsing binaries and 22 non-eclipsing close binaries. Our newly discovered systems generally have optical fluxes dominated by the main-sequence components, which have earlier spectral types than the majority of previously discovered eclipsing systems. We find a large number of ellipsoidally variable binaries with similar periods, near 4 hours, and spectral types M2--3, which are very close to Roche-lobe filling. We also find that the fraction of eclipsing systems is lower than found in previous studies and likely reflects a lower close binary fraction among WDMS binaries with early M-type main-sequence stars due to their enhanced angular momentum loss compared to fully convective late M type stars, hence causing them to become cataclysmic variables quicker and disappear from the WDMS sample. Our systems bring the total number of known detached, eclipsing WDMS binaries to 71.
  • We present the first results of a dedicated search for pulsating white dwarfs (WDs) in detached white dwarf plus main-sequence binaries. Candidate systems were selected from a catalogue of WD+MS binaries, based on the surface gravities and effective temperatures of the WDs. We observed a total of 26 systems using ULTRACAM mounted on ESO's 3.5m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at La Silla. Our photometric observations reveal pulsations in seven WDs of our sample, including the first pulsating white dwarf with a main-sequence companion in a post common envelope binary, SDSSJ1136+0409. Asteroseismology of these new pulsating systems will provide crucial insight into how binary interactions, particularly the common envelope phase, affect the internal structure and evolution of WDs. In addition, our observations have revealed the partially eclipsing nature of one of our targets, SDSSJ1223-0056.
  • Detached white dwarf + main sequence (WD+MS) systems represent the simplest population of post-common envelope binaries (PCEBs). Since the ensemble properties of this population carries important information about the characteristics of the common-envelope (CE) phase, it deserves close scrutiny. However, most population synthesis studies do not fully take into account the effects of the observational selection biases of the samples used to compare with the theoretical simulations. Here we present the results of a set of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the population of WD+MS binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We used up-to-date stellar evolutionary models, a complete treatment of the Roche lobe overflow episode, and a full implementation of the orbital evolution of the binary systems. Moreover, in our treatment we took into account the selection criteria and all the known observational biases. Our population synthesis study allowed us to make a meaningful comparison with the available observational data. In particular, we examined the CE efficiency, the possible contribution of internal energy, and the initial mass ratio distribution (IMRD) of the binary systems. We found that our simulations correctly reproduce the properties of the observed distribution of WD+MS PCEBs. In particular, we found that once the observational biases are carefully taken into account, the distribution of orbital periods and of masses of the WD and MS stars can be correctly reproduced for several choices of the free parameters and different IMRDs, although models in which a moderate fraction (<=10%) of the internal energy is used to eject the CE and in which a low value of CE efficiency is used (<=0.3) seem to fit better the observational data. We also found that systems with He-core WDs are over-represented in the observed sample, due to selection effects.
  • The eclipsing white dwarf plus main-sequence binary NN Serpentis provides one of the most convincing cases for the existence of circumbinary planets around evolved binaries. The exquisite timing precision provided by the deep eclipse of the white dwarf has revealed complex variations in the eclipse arrival times over the last few decades. These variations have been interpreted as the influence of two planets in orbit around the binary. Recent studies have proved that such a system is dynamically stable over the current lifetime of the binary. However, the existence of such planets is by no means proven and several alternative mechanisms have been proposed that could drive similar variations. One of these is apsidal precession, which causes the eclipse times of eccentric binaries to vary sinusoidally on many year timescales. In this paper we present timing data for the secondary eclipse of NN Ser and show that they follow the same trend seen in the primary eclipse times, ruling out apsidal precession as a possible cause for the variations. This result leaves no alternatives to the planetary interpretation for the observed period variations, although we still do not consider their existence as proven. Our data limits the eccentricity of NN Ser to e<0.001. We also detect a 3.3+/-1.0 second delay in the arrival times of the secondary eclipses relative to the best planetary model. This delay is consistent with the expected 2.84+/-0.04 second Romer delay of the binary, and is the first time this effect has been detected in a white dwarf plus M dwarf system.
  • SDSS J030308.35+005444.1 is a close, detached, eclipsing white dwarf plus M dwarf binary which shows a large infrared excess which has been interpreted in terms of a circumbinary dust disk. In this paper we present optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic data for this system. At optical wavelengths we observe heated pole caps from the white dwarf caused by accretion of wind material from the main-sequence star on to the white dwarf. At near-infrared wavelengths we see the eclipse of two poles on the surface of the white dwarf by the main-sequence star, indicating that the white dwarf is magnetic. Our spectroscopic observations reveal Zeeman split emission lines in the hydrogen Balmer series, which we use to measure the magnetic field strength as 8MG. This measurement indicates that the cyclotron lines are located in the infrared, naturally explaining the infrared excess without the need for a circumbinary dust disk. We also detect magnetically-confined material located roughly midway between the two stars. Using measurements of the radial velocity amplitude and rotational broadening of the M star we constrain the physical parameters of the system, a first for a magnetic white dwarf, and the location of the poles on the surface of the white dwarf. SDSS J030308.35+005444.1 is a pre-cataclysmic variable that will likely evolve into an intermediate polar in ~1Gyr.
  • HD 142527 is a pre-transition disk with strong evidence for on-going planet formation. Recent observations show a disrupted disk with spiral arms, a dust-depleted inner cavity and the possible presence of gas streams driving gas from the outer disk towards the central star. We aim to derive the morphology of the disk, as well as the distribution and properties of the dust at its surface. We have obtained polarized differential images of HD 142527 at $H$ and $Ks$ bands with NaCo at the VLT. Combining these images with classical PSF-subtraction, we are able to derive the polarization degree of this disk. At $H$ band the polarization degree of the disk varies between 10% and 25%. This result cannot be reproduced by dust distributions containing highly porous material. The polarization is better matched by distributions of compact particles, with maximum sizes at least up to a few microns, in agreement with previous observations. We also observe two regions of low emission (nulls) in total and in polarized intensity. In particular, one of these nulls is at roughly the same position as the maximum of the horse-shoe shape observed in sub-millimeter continuum emission ALMA Band-7 (345 GHz) observations. We discuss the possible link between both features.
  • Apparent period variations detected in several eclipsing, close-compact binaries are frequently interpreted as being caused by circumbinary giant planets. This interpretation raises the question of the origin of the potential planets that must have either formed in the primordial circumbinary disk, together with the host binary star, and survived its evolution into a close-compact binary or formed in a post-common-envelope circumbinary disk that remained bound to the post-common-envelope binary (PCEB). Here we combine current knowledge of planet formation and the statistics of giant planets around primordial and evolved binary stars with the theory of close-compact binary star evolution aiming to derive new constraints on possible formation scenarios. We compiled a comprehensive list of observed eclipsing PCEBs, estimated the fraction of systems showing apparent period variations, reconstructed the evolutionary history of the PCEBs, and performed binary population models of PCEBs to characterize their main sequence binary progenitors. We reviewed the currently available constraints on the fraction of PCEB progenitors that host circumbinary giant planets. We find that the progenitors of PCEBs are very unlikely to be frequent hosts of giant planets (<~10 per cent), while the frequency of PCEBs with observed apparent period variations is very high (~90 per cent). The variations in eclipse timings measured in eclipsing PCEBs are probably not caused by first-generation planets that survived common-envelope evolution. The remaining options for explaining the observed period variations are second-generation planet formation or perhaps variations in the shape of a magnetically active secondary star. We suggest observational tests for both options.
  • We analyse the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey light curves of 835 spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf plus main-sequence binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with g<19, in search of new eclipsing systems. We identify 29 eclipsing systems, 12 of which were previously unknown. This brings the total number of eclipsing white dwarf plus main-sequence binaries to 49. Our set of new eclipsing systems contains two with periods of 1.9 and 2.3 days making them the longest period eclipsing white dwarf binaries known. We also identify one system which shows very large ellipsoidal modulation (almost 0.3 magnitudes), implying that the system is both very close to Roche-lobe overflow and at high inclination. However, our follow up photometry failed to firmly detect an eclipse meaning that this system either contains a cool white dwarf and hence the eclipse is very shallow and undetectable in our red-sensitive photometry or that it is non-eclipsing. Radial velocity measurements for the main-sequence stars in three of our newly identified eclipsing systems imply that their white dwarf masses are lower than those inferred from modelling their SDSS spectra. 13 non-eclipsing post common envelope binaries were also identified, from either reflection or ellipsoidal modulation effects. The white dwarfs in our newly discovered eclipsing systems span a wide range of parameters, including; low mass (~0.3Msol), very hot (80,000K) and a DC white dwarf. The spectral types of the main-sequence stars range from M2 to M6. This makes our sample ideal for testing white dwarf and low-mass star mass-radius relationships as well as close binary evolution.
  • Studies of cool white dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood have placed a limit on the age of the Galactic disk of 8-9 billion years. However, determining their cooling ages requires the knowledge of their effective temperatures, masses, radii, and atmospheric composition. So far, these parameters could only be inferred for a small number of ultracool white dwarfs for which an accurate distance is known, by fitting their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in conjunction with a theoretical mass-radius relation. However, the mass-radius relation remains largely untested, and the derived cooling ages are hence model-dependent. Here we report direct measurements of the mass and radius of an ultracool white dwarf in the double-lined eclipsing binary SDSS J013851.54-001621.6. We find M(WD)=0.529+/-0.010Msol and R(WD)=0.0131+/-0.0003Rsol. Our measurements are consistent with the mass-radius relation and we determine a robust cooling age of 9.5 billion years for the 3570K white dwarf. We find that the mass and radius of the low mass companion star, M(sec)=0.132+/-0.003Msol and R(sec)=0.165+/-0.001Rsol, are in agreement with evolutionary models. We also find evidence that this >9.5 Gyr old M5 star is still active, far beyond the activity lifetime for a star of its spectral type. This is likely caused by the high tidally-enforced rotation rate of the star. The companion star is close to filling its Roche lobe and the system will evolve into a cataclysmic variable in only 70 Myr. Our direct measurements demonstrate that this system can be used to calibrate ultracool white dwarf atmospheric models.
  • We use a combination of X-shooter spectroscopy, ULTRACAM high-speed photometry and SOFI near-infrared photometry to measure the masses and radii of both components of the eclipsing post common envelope binaries SDSS J1212-0123 and GK Vir. For both systems we measure the gravitational redshift of the white dwarf and combine it with light curve model fits to determine the inclinations, masses and radii. For SDSS J1212-0123 we find a white dwarf mass and radius of 0.439 +/- 0.002 Msun and 0.0168 +/- 0.0003 Rsun, and a secondary star mass and radius of 0.273 +/- 0.002 Msun and 0.306 +/- 0.007 Rsun. For GK Vir we find a white dwarf mass and radius of 0.564 +/- 0.014 Msun and 0.0170 +/- 0.0004 Rsun, and a secondary star mass and radius of 0.116 +/- 0.003 Msun and 0.155 +/- 0.003 Rsun. The mass and radius of the white dwarf in GK Vir are consistent with evolutionary models for a 50,000K carbon-oxygen core white dwarf. Although the mass and radius of the white dwarf in SDSS J1212-0123 are consistent with carbon-oxygen core models, evolutionary models imply that a white dwarf with such a low mass and in a short period binary must have a helium core. The mass and radius measurements are consistent with helium core models but only if the white dwarf has a very thin hydrogen envelope, which has not been predicted by evolutionary models. The mass and radius of the secondary star in GK Vir are consistent with evolutionary models after correcting for the effects of irradiation by the white dwarf. The secondary star in SDSS J1212-0123 has a radius ~9 per cent larger than predicted.
  • A large set of Spitzer-selected transitional disks in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud was recently examined by Cieza et al (2010), and 4 of the targets were identified as (giant) planet-forming candidates based on the morphology of their Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs), the apparent lack of stellar companions, and evidence for accretion. Here we characterize the structures of these disks modeling their optical, infrared and (sub)millimeter SEDs. We use the Monte Carlo radiative transfer package RADMC to construct a parametric model of the dust distribution in a flared disk with an inner cavity and calculate the temperature structure consistent with the density profile, in thermal equilibrium with the irradiating star. For each object, we conducted a Bayesian exploration of the parameter space generating Monte Carlo Markov Chains (MCMC) that allow the identification of the best fit parameters and to constrain their range of statistical confidence. Our calculations point to the presence of evacuated cavities with radii ~2-8 AU, consistent with having been carved by embedded giant planets. We found parameter values consistent with those previously given in the literature, indicating a mild degree of grain growth and dust settling, which deserves to be investigated with further modeling and follow up observations. Resolved images with (sub)millimeter interferometers are required to break some of the degeneracies of the models and better constrain the physical properties of these fascinating disks.