• This paper reports on the development of a technology involving $^{100}$Mo-enriched scintillating bolometers, compatible with the goals of CUPID, a proposed next-generation bolometric experiment to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Large mass ($\sim$1~kg), high optical quality, radiopure $^{100}$Mo-containing zinc and lithium molybdate crystals have been produced and used to develop high performance single detector modules based on 0.2--0.4~kg scintillating bolometers. In particular, the energy resolution of the lithium molybdate detectors near the $Q$-value of the double-beta transition of $^{100}$Mo (3034~keV) is 4--6~keV FWHM. The rejection of the $\alpha$-induced dominant background above 2.6~MeV is better than 8$\sigma$. Less than 10~$\mu$Bq/kg activity of $^{232}$Th ($^{228}$Th) and $^{226}$Ra in the crystals is ensured by boule recrystallization. The potential of $^{100}$Mo-enriched scintillating bolometers to perform high sensitivity double-beta decay searches has been demonstrated with only 10~kg$\times$d exposure: the two neutrino double-beta decay half-life of $^{100}$Mo has been measured with the up-to-date highest accuracy as $T_{1/2}$ = [6.90 $\pm$ 0.15(stat.) $\pm$ 0.37(syst.)] $\times$ 10$^{18}$~yr. Both crystallization and detector technologies favor lithium molybdate, which has been selected for the ongoing construction of the CUPID-0/Mo demonstrator, containing several kg of $^{100}$Mo.
  • We have studied a representative sample of intermediate-mass galaxies at z~1, observed by the kinematic survey KMOS3D. We have re-estimated the kinematical parameters from the published kinematic maps and analysed photometric data from HST to measure optical disk inclinations and PAs. We find that only half of the z~1 galaxies show kinematic properties consistent with rotating disks, using the same classification scheme than that adopted by the KMOS3D team. Because merger orbital motions can also brought rotation, we have also analysed galaxy morphologies from the available HST imagery. Combining these results to those from kinematics, it leads to a full morpho-kinematic classification. To test the robustness of the latter for disentangling isolated disks from mergers, we confronted the results with an analysis of pairs from the open-grism redshift survey 3D-HST. All galaxies found in pairs are affected by either kinematic and/or morphological perturbations. Conversely, all galaxies classified as virialized spirals are found to be isolated. A significant fraction (one fourth) of rotating disks classified from kinematics by the KMOS3D team are found in pairs, which further supports the need for a morpho-kinematic classification. It results that only one third of z~1 galaxies are isolated and virialized spirals, while 58% of them are likely involved in a merger sequence, from first approach to disk rebuilding. The later fraction is in good agreement with the results of semi-empirical {\Lambda}CDM models, supporting a merger-dominated hierarchical scenario as being the main driver of galaxy formation at least during the last 8 billion years.
  • Building on the comprehensive White Paper on the scientific case for multi-object spectroscopy on the European ELT, we present the top-level instrument requirements that are being used in the Phase A design study of the MOSAIC concept. The assembled cases span the full range of E-ELT science and generally require either 'high multiplex' or 'high definition' observations to best exploit the excellent sensitivity and spatial performance of the telescope. We highlight some of the science studies that are now being used in trade-off studies to inform the capabilities of MOSAIC and its technical design.
  • The metallicity of a supernova (SN) progenitor, together with its mass, is one of the main parameters that rules their outcome. We present a metallicity study of 115 nearby SN host galaxies (0.005<z<0.03) which hosted 142 SNe using Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) from the CALIFA survey. Using O3N2 we found no statistically significant differences between the gas-phase metallicities at the locations of the three main SN types (Ia, Ib/c and II) all having ~8.50$\pm$0.02 dex. The total galaxy metallicities are also very similar and we argue that this is because our sample consists only of SNe discovered in massive galaxies (log(M/Msun)>10 dex) by targeted searches. We also found no evidence that the metallicity at the SN location differs from the average metallicity at the GCD of the SNe. By extending our SN sample with published metallicities at the SN location, we studied the metallicity distributions for all SN subtypes split into SN discovered in targeted and untargeted searches. We confirm a bias toward higher host masses and metallicities in the targeted searches. Combining data from targeted and untargeted searches we found a sequence from higher to lower local metallicity: SN Ia, Ic, and II show the highest metallicity, which is significantly higher than SN Ib, IIb, and Ic-BL. Our results support the picture of SN Ib resulting from binary progenitors and, at least part of, SN Ic being the result of single massive stars stripped of their outer layers by metallicity driven winds. We studied several proxies of the local metallicity frequently used in the literature and found that the total host metallicity allows for the estimation of the metallicity at the SN location with an accuracy better than 0.08 dex and very small bias. In addition, weak AGNs not seen in total spectra may only weakly bias (by 0.04 dex) the metallicity estimate from integrated spectra. (abridged)
  • The reports collected in these proceedings have been presented in the third French-Ukrainian workshop on the instrumentation developments for high-energy physics held at LAL, Orsay on October 15-16. The workshop was conducted in the scope of the IDEATE International Associated Laboratory (LIA). Joint developments between French and Ukrainian laboratories and universities as well as new proposals have been discussed. The main topics of the papers presented in the Proceedings are developments for accelerator and beam monitoring, detector developments, joint developments for large-scale high-energy and astroparticle physics projects, medical applications.
  • We examine the properties of galaxies in the Galaxies and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey located in voids with radii $>10~h^{-1}$ Mpc. Utilising the GAMA equatorial survey, 592 void galaxies are identified out to z~0.1 brighter than $M_{r} = -18.4$, our magnitude completeness limit. Using the $W_{\rm{H\alpha}}$ vs. [NII]/H$\alpha$ (WHAN) line strength diagnostic diagram, we classify their spectra as star forming, AGN, or dominated by old stellar populations. For objects more massive than $5\times10^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$, we identify a sample of 26 void galaxies with old stellar populations classed as passive and retired galaxies in the WHAN diagnostic diagram, else they lack any emission lines in their spectra. When matched to WISE mid-IR photometry, these passive and retired galaxies exhibit a range of mid-IR colour, with a number of void galaxies exhibiting [4.6]-[12] colours inconsistent with completely quenched stellar populations, with a similar spread in colour seen for a randomly drawn non-void comparison sample. We hypothesise that a number of these galaxies host obscured star formation, else they are star forming outside of their central regions targeted for single fibre spectroscopy. When matched to a randomly drawn sample of non-void galaxies, the void and non-void galaxies exhibit similar properties in terms of optical and mid-IR colour, morphology, and star formation activity, suggesting comparable mass assembly and quenching histories. A trend in mid-IR [4.6]-[12] colour is seen, such that both void and non-void galaxies with quenched/passive colours <1.5 typically have masses higher than $10^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$, where internally driven processes play an increasingly important role in galaxy evolution.
  • Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR 7, we investigate the environment, morphology and stellar population of bulgeless low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in a volume-limited sample with redshift ranging from 0.024 to 0.04 and $M_r$ $\leq$ $-18.8$. The local density parameter $\Sigma_5$ is used to trace their environments. We find that, for bulgeless galaxies, the surface brightness does not depend on the environment. The stellar populations are compared for bulgeless LSB galaxies in different environments and for bulgeless LSB galaxies with different morphologies. The stellar populations of LSB galaxies in low density regions are similar to those of LSB galaxies in high density regions. Irregular LSB galaxies have more young stars and are more metal-poor than regular LSB galaxies. These results suggest that the evolution of LSB galaxies may be driven by their dynamics including mergers rather than by their large scale environment.
  • The analysis of physical measurements often copes with highly correlated noises and interruptions caused by outliers, saturation events or transmission losses. We assess the impact of missing data on the performance of linear regression analysis involving the fit of modeled or measured time series. We show that data gaps can significantly alter the precision of the regression parameter estimation in the presence of colored noise, due to the frequency leakage of the noise power. We present a regression method which cancels this effect and estimates the parameters of interest with a precision comparable to the complete data case, even if the noise power spectral density (PSD) is not known a priori. The method is based on an autoregressive (AR) fit of the noise, which allows us to build an approximate generalized least squares estimator approaching the minimal variance bound. The method, which can be applied to any similar data processing, is tested on simulated measurements of the MICROSCOPE space mission, whose goal is to test the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) with a precision of $10^{-15}$. In this particular context the signal of interest is the WEP violation signal expected to be found around a well defined frequency. We test our method with different gap patterns and noise of known PSD and find that the results agree with the mission requirements, decreasing the uncertainty by a factor 60 with respect to ordinary least squares methods. We show that it also provides a test of significance to assess the uncertainty of the measurement.
  • The technology of scintillating bolometers based on zinc molybdate (ZnMoO$_4$) crystals is under development within the LUMINEU project to search for 0$\nu$2$\beta$ decay of $^{100}$Mo with the goal to set the basis for large scale experiments capable to explore the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern. Advanced ZnMoO$_4$ crystal scintillators with mass of $\sim$~0.3 kg were developed and Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystal from enriched $^{100}$Mo was produced for the first time by using the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. One ZnMoO$_4$ scintillator and two samples (59 g and 63 g) cut from the enriched boule were tested aboveground at milli-Kelvin temperature as scintillating bolometers showing a high detection performance. The first results of the low background measurements with three ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched detectors installed in the EDELWEISS set-up at the Modane Underground Laboratory (France) are presented.
  • [Abridged] We use optical IFS of nearby SN host galaxies provided by the CALIFA Survey with the goal of finding correlations in the environmental parameters at the location of different SN types. We recover the sequence in association of different SN types to the star-forming regions by using several indicators of the ongoing and recent SF related to both the ionized gas and the stellar populations. While the total ongoing SF is on average the same for the three SN types, SNe Ibc/IIb tend to happen closer to star-forming regions and occur in higher SF density locations compared to SNe II and SNe~Ia, the latter showing the weakest correlation. SNe~Ia host galaxies have on average masses that are $\sim$0.3-0.8~dex higher than CC SNe hosts due to a larger fraction of old stellar populations in the SNe~Ia hosts. Using the recent SN~Ia delay-time distribution and the SFHs of the galaxies, we show that the SN~Ia hosts in our sample should presently produce a factor 2 more SNe~Ia than the CC~SN hosts. Since both types are in hosts with similar SF rate and hence similar CC~SN rate, this can explain the mass difference between the SN~Ia and CC~SN hosts, and reinforce the finding that at least part of SNe~Ia should originate from very old progenitors. Comparing the mean SFH of the eight least massive galaxies to that of the massive SF SN~Ia hosts we find that the low-mass galaxies formed their stars over more extended time than the massive SN~Ia hosts. We estimate that the low-mass galaxies should produce by a factor of 10 less SNe~Ia, and a factor of 3 less CC~SNe than the high-mass group. Therefore the ratio between the number of CC~SNe and SNe~Ia is expected to increase with decreasing the galaxy mass. CC~SNe tend to explode at positions with younger stellar populations than the galaxy average, but the galaxy properties at SNe~Ia locations are one average the same as the global ones.
  • The relation between the star formation rate and the stellar mass of star-forming galaxies has been used to argue that major mergers cannot be the main driver of star formation. Here, we re-examine these arguments using the representative IMAGES-CDFS sample of star-forming galaxies at z=0.4-0.75, taking advantage of their previously established classification into pre-fusion, fusion, and relaxing galaxy mergers. Contrary to previous claims, we show there is no tension between the main sequence scatter and the average duration of the fusion star formation rate SFR peak. We confirm previous estimates of the fraction of SFR due to morphologically-selected galaxies (~23%) or the SFR enhancement due to major merger during the fusion phase (~10%). However, galaxy mergers are not instantaneous processes, which implies that the total fraction of the SFR associated to galaxies undergoing major mergers must account for the three merger phases. When doing so, galaxies involved in major mergers are found to represent 53-88% of the total SFR at z~0.6. The fraction of LIRGs in the fusion phase is found to be in agreement with the observed morphological fraction of LIRGs without disks and with the observed and expected major merger rates at z<1.5.
  • The LUMINEU program aims at performing a pilot experiment on neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo using radiopure ZnMoO4 crystals operated as scintillating bolometers. Growth of high quality radiopure crystals is a complex task, since there are no commercially available molybdenum compounds with the required levels of purity and radioactive contamination. This paper discusses approaches to purify molybdenum and synthesize compound for high quality radiopure ZnMoO4 crystal growth. A combination of a double sublimation (with addition of zinc molybdate) with subsequent recrystallization in aqueous solutions (using zinc molybdate as a collector) was used. Zinc molybdate crystals up to 1.5 kg were grown by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique, their optical, luminescent, diamagnetic, thermal and bolometric properties were tested.
  • MOONS is a new conceptual design for a Multi-Object Optical and Near-infrared Spectrograph for the Very Large Telescope (VLT), selected by ESO for a Phase A study. The baseline design consists of 1000 fibers deployable over a field of view of 500 square arcmin, the largest patrol field offered by the Nasmyth focus at the VLT. The total wavelength coverage is 0.8um-1.8um and two resolution modes: medium resolution and high resolution. In the medium resolution mode (R=4,000-6,000) the entire wavelength range 0.8um-1.8um is observed simultaneously, while the high resolution mode covers simultaneously three selected spectral regions: one around the CaII triplet (at R=8,000) to measure radial velocities, and two regions at R=20,000 one in the J-band and one in the H-band, for detailed measurements of chemical abundances. The grasp of the 8.2m Very Large Telescope (VLT) combined with the large multiplex and wavelength coverage of MOONS - extending into the near-IR - will provide the observational power necessary to study galaxy formation and evolution over the entire history of the Universe, from our Milky Way, through the redshift desert and up to the epoch of re-ionization at z>8-9. At the same time, the high spectral resolution mode will allow astronomers to study chemical abundances of stars in our Galaxy, in particular in the highly obscured regions of the Bulge, and provide the necessary follow-up of the Gaia mission. Such characteristics and versatility make MOONS the long-awaited workhorse near-IR MOS for the VLT, which will perfectly complement optical spectroscopy performed by FLAMES and VIMOS.
  • The detection and characterization of the physical properties of very distant galaxies will be one the prominent science case of all future Extremely Large Telescopes, including the 39m E-ELT. Multi-Object Spectroscopic instruments are potentially very important tools for studying these objects, and in particular fiber-based concepts. However, detecting and studying such faint and distant sources will require subtraction of the sky background signal (i.e., between OH airglow lines) with an accuracy of ~1%. This requires a precise and accurate knowledge of the sky background temporal and spatial fluctuations. Using FORS2 narrow-band filter imaging data, we are currently investigating what are the fluctuations of the sky background at ~9000A. We present preliminary results of sky background fluctuations from this study over spatial scales reaching ~4 arcmin, as well as first glimpses into the temporal variations of such fluctuations over timescales of the order of the hour. This study (and other complementary on-going studies) will be essential in designing the next-generation fiber-fed instruments for the E-ELT.
  • About two-thirds of present-day, large galaxies are spirals such as the Milky Way or Andromeda, but the way their thin rotating disks formed remains uncertain. Observations have revealed that half of their progenitors, six billion years ago, had peculiar morphologies and/or kinematics, which exclude them from the Hubble sequence. Major mergers, i.e., fusions between galaxies of similar mass, are found to be the likeliest driver for such strong peculiarities. However, thin disks are fragile and easily destroyed by such violent collisions, which creates a critical tension between the observed fraction of thin disks and their survival within the L-CDM paradigm. Here we show that the observed high occurrence of mergers amongst their progenitors is only apparent and is resolved when using morpho-kinematic observations which are sensitive to all the phases of the merging process. This provides an original way of narrowing down observational estimates of the galaxy merger rate and leads to a perfect match with predictions by state-of-the-art L-CDM semi-empirical models with no particular fine-tuning needed. These results imply that half of local thin disks do not survive but are actually rebuilt after a gas-rich major merger occurring in the past nine billion years, i.e., two-thirds of the lifetime of the Universe. This emphasizes the need to study how thin disks can form in halos with a more active merger history than previously considered, and to investigate what is the origin of the gas reservoir from which local disks would reform.
  • (abridged) We used the wide-field IFU spectrograph PMAS/PPAK at the 3.5m telescope of Calar Alto Observatory to observe six nearby spiral galaxies that hosted SNe Ia. Spatially resolved 2D maps of the properties of the ionized gas and the stellar populations were derived. Five of the observed galaxies have an ongoing star formation rate of 1-5 M_sun/yr and mean stellar population ages ~5 Gyr. The sixth galaxy shows no star formation and has an about 12 Gyr old stellar population. All galaxies have stellar masses larger than 2E+10 M_sun and metallicities above solar. Four galaxies show negative radial metallicity gradients of the ionized gas up to -0.058 dex/kpc and one has nearly uniform metallicity with a possible shallow positive slope. The stellar components show shallower negative metallicity gradients up to -0.03 dex/kpc. We find no clear correlation between the properties of the galaxy and those of the supernovae, which may be because of the small ranges spanned by the galaxy parameters. However, we note that the Hubble residuals are on average positive while negative Hubble residuals are expected for SNe Ia in massive hosts such as the galaxies in our sample. In conclusion, IFU spectroscopy on 4-m telescopes is a viable technique for studying host galaxies of nearby SNe Ia. It allows one to correlate the supernova properties with the properties of their host galaxies at the projected positions of the supernovae. Our current sample of six galaxies is too small to draw conclusions about the SN Ia progenitors or correlations with the galaxy properties, but the ongoing CALIFA IFU survey will provide a solid basis to exploit this technique more and improve our understanding of SNe Ia as cosmological standard candles.
  • Using a representative sample of 65 intermediate mass galaxies at z \sim 0.6, we have inves- tigated the interplay between the main ingredients of chemical evolution: metal abundance, gas mass, stellar mass and SFR. All quantities have been estimated using deep spectroscopy and photometry from UV to IR and assuming an inversion of the Schmitt-Kennicutt law for the gas fraction. Six billion years ago, galaxies had a mean gas fraction of 32% \pm 3, i.e. twice that of their local counterparts. Using higher redshift samples from the literature, we explore the gas-phases and estimate the evolution of the mean gas fraction of distant galaxies over the last 11 Gy. The gas fraction increases linearly at the rate of 4% per Gyr from z \sim 0 to z \sim 2.2. We also demonstrate for a statistically representative sample that < 4% of the z \sim 0.6 galaxies are undergoing outflow events, in sharp contrast with z \sim 2.2 galaxies. The observed co-evolution of metals and gas over the past 6 Gyr favours a scenario in which the population of intermediate mass galaxies evolved as closed-systems, converting their own gas reservoirs into stars.
  • Using the deepest and the most complete set of observations of distant galaxies, we investigate how extended disks could have formed. Observations include spatially-resolved kinematics, detailed morphologies and photometry from UV to mid-IR. Six billion years ago, half of the present-day spiral progenitors had anomalous kinematics and morphologies, as well as relatively high gas fractions. We argue that gas-rich major mergers, i.e., fusions between gas-rich disk galaxies of similar mass, can be the likeliest driver for such strong peculiarities. This suggests a new channel of disk formation, e.g. many disks could be reformed after gas-rich mergers. This is found to be in perfect agreement with predictions from the state-of-the-art LCDM semi-empirical models: due to our sensitivity in detecting mergers at all phases, from pairs to relaxed post-mergers, we find a more accurate merger rate. The scenario can be finally confronted to properties of nearby galaxies, including M31 and galaxies showing ultra-faint, gigantic structures in their haloes.
  • We perform a detailed study of the gamma-ray burst GRB091127/SN2009nz host galaxy at z=0.490 using the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph in slit and integral-field unit (IFU). From the analysis of the optical and X-ray afterglow data obtained from ground-based telescopes and Swift-XRT we confirm the presence of a bump associated with SN2009nz and find evidence of a possible jet break in the afterglow lightcurve. The X-shooter afterglow spectra reveal several emission lines from the underlying host, from which we derive its integrated properties. These are in agreement with those of previously studied GRB-SN hosts and, more generally, with those of the long GRB host population. We use the Hubble Space Telescope and ground based images of the host to determine its stellar mass (M_star). Our results extend to lower M_star values the M-Z plot derived for the sample of long GRB hosts at 0.3<z<1.0 adding new information to probe the faint end of the M-Z relation and the shift of the LGRB host M-Z relation from that found from emission line galaxy surveys. Thanks to the IFU spectroscopy we can build the 2D velocity, velocity dispersion and star formation rate (SFR) maps. They show that the host galaxy has a perturbed rotation kinematics with evidence of a SFR enhancement consistent with the afterglow position.
  • Scaling relations are salient ingredients of galaxy evolution and formation models. I summarize results from the IMAGES survey, which combines spatially-resolved kinematics from FLAMES/GIRAFFE with imaging from HST/ACS and other facilities. Specifically, I will focus on the evolution of the stellar mass and baryonic Tully-Fisher Relations (TFR) from z=0.6 down to z=0. We found a significant evolution in zero point and scatter of the stellar mass TFR compared to the local Universe. Combined with gas fractions derived by inverting the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation, we derived for the first time a baryonic TFR at high redshift. Conversely to the stellar mass TFR, the baryonic relation does not appear to evolve in zero point, which suggests that most of the reservoir of gas converted into stars over the past 6 Gyr was already gravitationally bound to galaxies at z=0.6.
  • We present a new method to subtract sky light from faint object observations with fiber-fed spectrographs. The algorithm has been developed in the framework of the phase A of OPTIMOS-EVE, an optical-to-IR multi-object spectrograph for the future european extremely large telescope (E-ELT). The new technique overcomes the apparent limitation of fiber-fed instrument to recover with high accuracy the sky contribution. The algorithm is based on the reconstruction of the spatial fluctuations of the sky background (both continuum and emission) and allows us to subtract the sky background contribution in an FoV of $7\times7 arcmin^2$ with an accuracy of 1% in the mono-fibers mode, and 0.3-0.4% for integral-field-unit observations.
  • The "Extreme starbursts in the local universe" workshop was held at the Insituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia in Granada, Spain on 21-25 June 2010. Bearing in mind the advent of a new generation of facilities such as JWST, Herschel, ALMA, eVLA and eMerlin, the aim of the workshop was to bring together observers and theorists to review the latest results. The purpose of the workshop was to address the following issues: what are the main modes of triggering extreme starbursts in the local Universe? How efficiently are stars formed in extreme starbursts? What are the star formation histories of local starburst galaxies? How well do the theoretical simulations model the observations? What can we learn about starbursts in the distant Universe through studies of their local counterparts? How important is the role of extreme starbursts in the hierarchical assembly of galaxies? How are extreme starbursts related to the triggering of AGN in the nuclei of galaxies? Overall, 41 talks and 4 posters with their corresponding 10 minutes short talks were presented during the workshop. In addition, the workshop was designed with emphasis on discussions, and therefore, there were 6 discussion sessions of up to one hour during the workshop. Here is presented a summary of the purposes of the workshop as well as a compilation of the abstracts corresponding to each of the presentations. The summary and conclusions of the workshop along with a description of the future prospects by Sylvain Veilleux can be found in the last section of this document. A photo of the assistants is included.
  • Aims. We have gathered optical spectra of 8 long-duration GRB host galaxies selected from the archival data of VLT/FORS2. We investigated whether or not Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars can be detected in these GRB host galaxies. We also tried to estimate the physical properties of GRB host galaxies, such as metallicity. Methods. We identified the WR features in these spectra by fitting the WR bumps and WR emission lines in blue and red bumps. We also identified the subtypes of the WR stars, and estimated the numbers of stars in each subtype, then calculated the WR/O star ratios. The (O/H) abundances of GRB hosts were estimated from both the electron temperature (Te) and the metallicity-sensitive strong-line ratio (R23), for which we have broken the R23 degeneracy. We compared the environments of long-duration GRB host galaxies with those of other galaxies in terms of their luminosity (stellar mass)-metallicity relations (LZ, MZ). Results. We detected the presence of WR stars in 5 GRB host galaxies having spectra with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). In the comparison of LZ, MZ relations, it shows that GRB hosts have lower metallicities than other samples with comparable luminosity and stellar mass. The presence of WR stars and the observed high WR/O star ratio, together with low metallicity, support the core-collapsar model and implie the first stage of star formation in the hosted regions of GRBs.
  • We compare six popularly used evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models (BC03, CB07, Ma05, GALEV, GRASIL, Vazdekis/Miles) through fitting the full optical spectra of six representative types of galaxies (star-forming and composite galaxies, Seyfert 2s, LINERs, E+A and early-type galaxies), which are taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Throughout our paper, we use the simple stellar populations (SSPs) from each EPS model and the software STARLIGHT to do our fits. Our main results are: Using different EPS models the resulted numerical values of contributed light fractions change obviously, even though the dominant populations are consistent. The stellar population synthesis does depend on the selection of age and metallicity, while it does not depend on the stellar evolution track much. The importance of young populations decreases from star-forming, composite, Seyfert 2, LINER to early-type galaxies, and E+A galaxies lie between composite galaxies and Seyfert 2s in most cases. We conclude that different EPS models do derive different stellar populations, so that it is not reasonable to directly compare stellar populations estimated from different EPS models. To get reliable results, we should use the same EPS model for the compared samples.
  • [abr.] Using the multi-integral-field spectrograph GIRAFFE at VLT, we previsouly derived the stellar-mass Tully-Fisher Relation (smTFR) at z~0.6, and found that the distant relation is systematically offset by roughly a factor of two toward lower masses. We extend the study of the evolution of the TFR by establishing the first distant baryonic TFR. To derive gas masses in distant galaxies, we estimate a gas radius and invert the Schmidt-Kennicutt law between star formation rate and gas surface densities. We find that gas extends farther out than the UV light from young stars, a median of ~30%. We present the first baryonic TFR (bTFR) ever established at intermediate redshift and show that, within an uncertainty of +/-0.08 dex, the zeropoint of the bTFR does not appear to evolve between z~0.6 and z=0. The absence of evolution in the bTFR over the past 6 Gyr implies that no external gas accretion is required for distant rotating disks to sustain star formation until z=0 and convert most of their gas into stars. Finally, we confirm that the larger scatter found in the distant smTFR, and hence in the bTFR, is caused entirely by major mergers. This scatter results from a transfer of energy from bulk motions in the progenitors, to random motions in the remnants, generated by shocks during the merging. Shocks occurring during these events naturally explain the large extent of ionized gas found out to the UV radius in z~0.6 galaxies. All the results presented in this paper support the ``spiral rebuilding scenario'' of Hammer and collaborators, i.e., that a large fraction of local spiral disks have been reprocessed during major mergers in the past 8 Gyr.