• The most frequently proposed model for the origin of quasars holds that the high accretion rates seen in luminous active galactic nuclei are primarily triggered during major mergers between gas-rich galaxies. While plausible for decades, this model has only begun to be tested with statistical rigor in the past few years. Here we report on a Hubble Space Telescope study to test this hypothesis for $z=2$ quasars with high super-massive black hole masses ($M_\mathrm{BH}=10^9-10^{10}~M_\odot{}$), which dominate cosmic black hole growth at this redshift. We compare Wide Field Camera 3 $F160W$ (rest-frame $V$-band) imaging of 19 point source-subtracted quasar hosts to a matched sample of 84 inactive galaxies, testing whether the quasar hosts have greater evidence for strong gravitational interactions. Using an expert ranking procedure, we find that the quasar hosts are uniformly distributed within the merger sequence of inactive galaxies, with no preference for quasars in high-distortion hosts. Using a merger/non-merger cutoff approach, we recover distortion fractions of $f_\mathrm{m,qso}=0.39\pm{}0.11$ for quasar hosts and $f_\mathrm{m,gal}=0.30\pm{}0.05$ for inactive galaxies (distribution modes, 68% confidence intervals), with both measurements subjected to the same observational conditions and limitations. The slight enhancement in distorted fraction for quasar hosts over inactive galaxies is not significant, with a probability that the quasar fraction is higher of $P(f_\mathrm{m,qso}>f_\mathrm{m,gal}) = 0.78$ ($0.78\,\sigma{}$), in line with results for lower mass and lower $z$ AGN. We find no evidence that major mergers are the primary triggering mechanism for the massive quasars that dominate accretion at the peak of cosmic quasar activity.
  • AGN driven outflows are invoked in numerical simulations to reproduce several observed properties of local galaxies. The z > 1 epoch is of particular interest as it was during this time that the volume averaged star formation and the accretion rate of black holes were maximum. Radiatively driven outflows are therefore believed to be common during this epoch. We aim to trace and characterize outflows in AGN hosts with high mass accretion rates at z > 1 using integral field spectroscopy. We obtain spatially-resolved kinematics of the [OIII]5007 line in two targets which reveal the morphology and spatial extension of the outflows. We present J and H+K band SINFONI observations of 5 AGNs at 1.2 < z < 2.2. To maximize the chance of observing radiatively driven outflows, our sample was pre-selected based on peculiar values of the Eddington ratio and the hydrogen column density of the surrounding interstellar medium. We observe high velocity (~600-1900 km/s) and kiloparsec scale extended ionized outflows in at least 3 of our targets, using [OIII]5007 line kinematics tracing the AGN narrow line region. We estimate the total mass of the outflow, the mass outflow rate, and the kinetic power of the outflows based on theoretical models and report on the uncertainties associated with them. We find mass outflow rates of ~1-10 M_sun/yr for the sample presented in this paper. Based on the high star formation rates of the host galaxies, the observed outflow kinetic power and the expected power due to the AGN, we infer that both star formation and AGN radiation could be the dominant source for the outflows. The outflow models suffer from large uncertainties, hence we call for further detailed observations for an accurate determination of the outflow properties to confirm the exact source of these outflows.
  • Outflows are invoked in co-evolutionary models to link the growth of SMBH and galaxies through feedback phenomena, and from the analysis of both galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) samples at z$\sim1-3$, it is becoming clear that powerful winds are quite common in AGN hosts. High-resolution and high S/N observations are needed in order to uncover the physical properties of the wind through kinematics analysis. We exploited VIMOS, SINFONI and Subaru/IRCS Adaptive Optics data to study the kinematics properties on the scale the host galaxy of XID5395, a luminous, X-ray obscured Starburst/Quasar merging system at z$\sim1.5$ detected in the XMM-COSMOS field, and associated with an extreme [O II] emitter (EW$\sim200$ \AA). We mapped, for the first time, at high resolution the kinematics of the [O III] and H$\alpha$ line complexes and linked them with the [O II] emission. The high spatial resolution achieved allowed us to resolve all the components of the SB-QSO system. Our analysis with a resolution of few kpc reveals complexities and asymmetries in and around the nucleus of XID5395. The velocity field measured via non parametric analysis reveals different kinematic components, with maximum blueshifted and redshifted velocities up to $\simeq1300$ km s$^{-1}$, not spatially coincident with the nuclear core. These extreme values of the observed velocities and the spatial location can be explained by the presence of fast moving material. We also spectroscopically confirm the presence of a merging system at the same redshift of the AGN host. We propose that EW as large as $>150$ \AA\ in X-ray selected AGN may be an efficient criterion to isolate objects associated to the short, transition phase of "feedback" in the AGN-galaxy co-evolutionary path, which will subsequently evolve in an unobscured QSO, as suggested from the different observational evidences we accumulated for XID5395.
  • Na I D absorbing systems toward Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been intensively studied over the last decade with the aim of finding circumstellar material (CSM), which is an indirect probe of the progenitor system. However, it is difficult to deconvolve CSM components from non-variable, and often dominant, components created by interstellar material (ISM). We present a series of high-resolution spectra of SN Ia 2014J from before maximum brightness to ~250 days after maximum brightness. The late-time spectrum provides unique information for determining the origin of the Na I D absorption systems. The deep late-time observation allows us to probe the environment around the SN at a large scale, extending to ~40 pc. We find that a spectrum of diffuse light in the vicinity, but not directly in the line-of-sight, of the SN has absorbing systems nearly identical to those obtained for the "pure" SN line-of-sight. Therefore, basically all Na I D systems seen toward SN 2014J must originate from foreground material that extends to at least ~40 pc in projection and none at the CSM scale. A fluctuation in the column densities at a scale of ~20 pc is also identified. After subtracting the diffuse, "background" spectrum, the late-time SN Na I D profile along the SN line-of-sight is consistent with the profile in the near-maximum brightness spectra. The lack of variability on a ~1 year timescale is consistent with the ISM interpretation for the gas.
  • We present a census of the active black hole population at 1<z<2, by constructing the bivariate distribution function of black hole mass and Eddington ratio, employing a maximum likelihood fitting technique. The study of the active black hole mass function (BHMF) and the Eddington ratio distribution function (ERDF) allows us to clearly disentangle the active galactic nuclei (AGN) downsizing phenomenon, present in the AGN luminosity function, into its physical processes of black hole mass downsizing and accretion rate evolution. We are utilizing type-1 AGN samples from three optical surveys (VVDS, zCOSMOS and SDSS), that cover a wide range of 3 dex in luminosity over our redshift interval of interest. We investigate the cosmic evolution of the AGN population as a function of AGN luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rate. Compared to z = 0, we find a distinct change in the shape of the BHMF and the ERDF, consistent with downsizing in black hole mass. The active fraction or duty cycle of type-1 AGN at z~1.5 is almost flat as a function of black hole mass, while it shows a strong decrease with increasing mass at z=0. We are witnessing a phase of intense black hole growth, which is largely driven by the onset of AGN activity in massive black holes towards z=2. We finally compare our results to numerical simulations and semi-empirical models and while we find reasonable agreement over certain parameter ranges, we highlight the need to refine these models in order to match our observations.
  • We took advantage of the observations carried out by XMM in the COSMOS field during 3.5 years, to study the long term variability of a large sample of AGN (638 sources), in a wide range of redshift (0.1<z<3.5) and X-ray luminosity ($10^{41}<$L(2-10)$<10^{45.5}$). Both a simple statistical method to asses the significance of variability, and the Normalized Excess Variance ($\sigma^{2}_{rms}$) parameter, where used to obtain a quantitative measurement of the variability. Variability is found to be prevalent in most AGN, whenever we have good statistic to measure it, and no significant differences between type-1 and type-2 AGN were found. A flat (slope -0.23+/-0.03) anti-correlation between $\sigma^{2}_{rms}$ and X-ray luminosity is found, when significantly variable sources are considered all together. When divided in three redshift bins, the anti-correlation becomes stronger and evolving with z, with higher redshift AGN being more variable. We prove however that this effect is due to the pre-selection of variable sources: considering all the sources with available $\sigma^{2}_{rms}$ measurement, the evolution in redshift disappears. For the first time we were also able to study the long term X-ray variability as a function of $M_{\rm BH}$ and Eddington ratio, for a large sample of AGN spanning a wide range of redshift. An anti-correlation between $\sigma^{2}_{rms}$ and $M_{\rm BH}$ is found, with the same slope of the anti-correlation between $\sigma^{2}_{rms}$ and X-ray luminosity, suggesting that the latter can be a byproduct of the former one. No clear correlation is found between $\sigma^{2}_{rms}$ and the Eddington ratio in our sample. Finally, no correlation is found between the X-ray $\sigma^{2}_{rms}$ and the optical variability.
  • Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) occur in galaxies in which supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are growing substantially through rapid accretion of gas. Many popular models of the co-evolutionary growth of galaxies and SMBHs predict that QSOs are also sites of substantial recent star formation, mediated by important processes, such as major mergers, which rapidly transform the nature of galaxies. A detailed study of the star-forming properties of QSOs is a critical test of such models. We present a far-infrared Herschel/PACS study of the mean star formation rate (SFR) of a sample of spectroscopically observed QSOs to z~2 from the COSMOS extragalactic survey. This is the largest sample to date of moderately luminous AGNs studied using uniform, deep far-infrared photometry. We study trends of the mean SFR with redshift, black hole mass, nuclear bolometric luminosity and specific accretion rate (Eddington ratio). To minimize systematics, we have undertaken a uniform determination of SMBH properties, as well as an analysis of important selection effects within spectroscopic QSO samples that influence the interpretation of SFR trends. We find that the mean SFRs of these QSOs are consistent with those of normal massive star-forming galaxies with a fixed scaling between SMBH and galaxy mass at all redshifts. No strong enhancement in SFR is found even among the most rapidly accreting systems, at odds with several co-evolutionary models. Finally, we consider the qualitative effects on mean SFR trends from different assumptions about the star-forming properties of QSO hosts and redshift evolution of the SMBH-galaxy relationship. While limited currently by uncertainties, valuable constraints on AGN-galaxy co-evolution can emerge from our approach.
  • We report the discovery of three low-mass black hole candidates residing in the centers of low-mass galaxies at z<0.3 in the Chandra Deep Field - South Survey. These black holes are initially identified as candidate active galactic nuclei based on their X-ray emission in deep Chandra observations. Multi-wavelength observations are used to strengthen our claim that such emission is powered by an accreting supermassive black hole. While the X-ray luminosities are low at L_X ~ 10^40 erg s^-1 (and variable in one case), we argue that they are unlikely to be attributed to star formation based on H\alpha or UV-fluxes. Optical spectroscopy with Keck/DEIMOS and VLT/FORS allows us to (1) measure accurate redshifts, (2) confirm their low stellar host mass, (3) investigate the source(s) of photo-ionization, and (4) estimate extinction. With stellar masses of M* < 3*10^9 M_\sun determined from HST/ACS imaging, the host galaxies are among the lowest mass systems known to host actively accreting black holes. We estimate BH masses M_BH ~ 2*10^5 M_\sun based on scaling relations between BH mass and host properties for more luminous systems. In one case, a broad component of the H\alpha emission-line profile is detected thus providing a virial mass estimate. Black holes in such low-mass galaxies are of considerable interest as the low-redshift analogs to the seeds of the most massive BHs at high redshift which have remained largely elusive to date. Our study highlights the power of deep X-ray surveys to uncover such low-mass systems.
  • We present an investigation into how well the properties of the accretion flow onto a supermassive black hole may be coupled to those of the overlying hot corona. To do so, we specifically measure the characteristic spectral index, Gamma, of a power-law energy distribution, over an energy range of 2 to 10 keV, for X-ray selected, broad-lined radio-quiet AGN up to z~2 in COSMOS and E-CDF-S. We test the previously reported dependence between Gamma and black hole mass, FWHM and Eddington ratio using a sample of AGN covering a broad range in these parameters based on both the Mg ii and H-alpha emission lines with the later afforded by recent near infrared spectroscopic observations using Subaru/FMOS. We calculate the Eddington ratios, lambda_Edd, for sources where a bolometric luminosity (L_Bol) has been presented in the literature, based on SED fitting, or, for sources where these data do not exist, we calculate L_Bol using a bolometric correction to the LX, derived from a relationship between the bolometric correction, and LX/L3000. From a sample of 69 X-ray bright sources (>250 counts), where Gamma can be measured with greatest precision, with an estimate of L_Bol, we find a statistically significant correlation between Gamma and lambda_Edd, which is highly significant with a chance probability of 6.59x10^-8. A statistically significant correlation between Gamma and the FWHM of the optical lines is confirmed, but at lower significance than with lambda_Edd indicating that lambda_Edd is the key parameter driving conditions in the corona. Linear regression analysis reveals that Gamma=(0.32+/-0.05)log10 lambda_Edd+(2.27+/-0.06) and Gamma=(-0.69+/-0.11)log10(FWHM/km/s)+(4.44+/-0.42). Our results on Gamma-lambda_Edd are in very good agreement with previous results. (ABRIDGED)
  • We present the results of a program to acquire high-quality optical spectra of X-ray sources detected in the E-CDF-S and its central area. New spectroscopic redshifts are measured for 283 counterparts to Chandra sources with deep exposures (t~2-9 hr per pointing) using multi-slit facilities on both the VLT and Keck thus bringing the total number of spectroscopically-identified X-ray sources to over 500 in this survey field. We provide a comprehensive catalog of X-ray sources detected in the E-CDF-S including the optical and near-infrared counterparts, and redshifts (both spectroscopic and photometric) that incorporate published spectroscopic catalogs thus resulting in a final sample with a high fraction (80%) of X-ray sources having secure identifications. We demonstrate the remarkable coverage of the Lx-z plane now accessible from our data while emphasizing the detection of AGNs that contribute to the faint end of the luminosity function at 1.5<z<3. Our redshift catalog includes 17 type 2 QSOs that significantly increases such samples (2x). With our deepest VIMOS observation, we identify "elusive" optically-faint galaxies (R~25) at z~2-3 based upon the detection of interstellar absorption lines; we highlight one such case, an absorption-line galaxy at z=3.208 having no obvious signs of an AGN in its optical spectrum. In addition, we determine distances to eight galaxy groups with extended X-ray emission. Finally, we measure the physical extent of known large-scale structures (z~0.7) evident in the CDF-S. While a thick sheet (radial size of 67.7 Mpc) at z~0.67 extends over the full field, the z~0.73 structure is thin (18.8 Mpc) and filamentary as traced by both AGNs and galaxy groups. In the appendix, we provide spectroscopic redshifts for 49 counterparts to fainter X-ray sources detected only in the 1 and 2 Ms catalogs, and 48 VLA radio sources not detected in X-rays.
  • We use one of the deepest spectroscopic samples of broad line active galactic nuclei (AGN) currently available, extracted from the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS), to compute MgII and CIV virial masses estimate of 120 super-massive black holes in the redshift range 1.0<z<1.9 and 2.6<z<4.3. We find that the mass-luminosity relation shows considerably enhanced dispersion towards low AGN luminosities (log L_bol ~ 45). At these luminosities, there is a substantial fraction of black holes accreting far below their Eddington limit (L_bol/L_Edd < 0.1), in marked contrast to what is generally found for AGN of higher luminosities. We speculate that these may be AGN on the decaying branch of their light-curves, well past their peak activity. This would agree with recent theoretical predictions of AGN evolution. In the electronic Appendix of this paper we publish an update of the VVDS type-1 AGN sample, including the first and most of the second epoch observations. This sample contains 298 objects of which 168 are new.
  • We have used GADGET2 to simulate the formation of an elliptical galaxy in a cosmological dark matter halo with mass 3x10^12M_Sun/h. Using a stellar population synthesis model has allowed us to compute magnitudes, colours and surface brightness profiles. We have included a model to follow the growth of a central black hole and we have compared the results of simulations with and without feedback from AGNs. We have studied the interplay between cold gas accretion and merging in the development of galactic morphologies, the link between colour and morphology evolution, the effect of AGN feedback on the photometry of early type galaxies, the redshift evolution in the properties of quasar hosts, and the impact of AGN winds on the chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium (IGM). We have found that the early phases of galaxy formation are driven by the accretion of cold filamentary flows, which form a disc at the centre of the dark matter halo. When the dark matter halo is sufficiently massive to support the propagation of a stable shock, cold accretion is shut down, and the star formation rate begins to decline. Mergers transform the disc into an elliptical galaxy, but also bring gas into the galaxy. Without a mechanism that removes gas from the merger remnants, the galaxy ends up with blue colours, atypical for its elliptical morphology. AGN feedback can solve this problem even with a fairly low heating efficiency. We have also demonstrated that AGN winds are potentially important for the metal enrichment of the IGM a high redshift.(abridged)