• We use the largest sample of z~6 galaxies to date from the first four Hubble Frontier Fields clusters to set constraints on the shape of the z~6 luminosity functions (LFs) to fainter than Muv=-14 mag. We quantify, for the first time, the impact of magnification uncertainties on LF results and thus provide more realistic constraints than other recent work. Our simulations reveal that for the highly-magnified sources the systematic uncertainties can become extremely large fainter than -14 mag, reaching several orders of magnitude at 95% confidence at ~-12 mag. Our new forward-modeling formalism incorporates the impact of magnification uncertainties into the LF results by exploiting the availability of many independent magnification models for the same cluster. One public magnification model is used to construct a mock high-redshift galaxy sample that is then analyzed using the other magnification models to construct a LF. Large systematic errors occur at high magnifications (mu>30) because of differences between the models. The volume densities we derive for faint (>-17 mag) sources are ~3-4x lower than one recent report and give a faint-end slope alpha=-1.92+/-0.04, which is 3.0-3.5sigma shallower (including or not including the size uncertainties, respectively). We introduce a new curvature parameter delta to model the faint end of the LF and demonstrate that the observations permit (at 68% confidence) a turn-over at z~6 in the range -15.3 to -14.2 mag, depending on the assumed lensing model. The present consideration of magnification errors and new size determinations raise doubts about previous reports regarding the form of the LF at >-14 mag. We discuss the implications of our turn-over constraints in the context of recent theoretical predictions.
  • We provide the first observational constraints on the sizes of the faintest galaxies lensed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) clusters. Ionizing radiation from faint galaxies likely drives cosmic reionization, and the HFF initiative provides a key opportunity to find such galaxies. Yet, we cannot really assess their ionizing emissivity without a robust measurement of their sizes, since this is key to quantifying both their prevalence and the faint-end slope to the UV luminosity function. Here we provide the first such size constraints with 2 new techniques. The first utilizes the fact that the detectability of highly-magnified galaxies as a function of shear is very dependent on a galaxy's size. Only the most compact galaxies will remain detectable in regions of high shear (vs. a larger detectable size range for low shear), a phenomenon we carefully quantify using simulations. Remarkably, however, no correlation is found between the surface density of faint galaxies and the predicted shear, using 87 faint high-magnification mu>10 z~2-8 galaxies seen behind the first 4 HFF clusters. This can only be the case if such faint (~-15 mag) galaxies have significantly smaller sizes than luminous galaxies. We constrain their half-light radii to be <~30 mas (<160-240 pc). As a 2nd size probe, we rotate and stack 26 faint high-magnification sources along the major shear axis. Less elongation is found than even for objects with an intrinsic half-light radius of 10 mas. Together these results indicate that extremely faint z~2-8 galaxies have near point-source profiles in the HFF dataset (half-light radii conservatively <30 mas and likely 5-10 mas). These results suggest smaller completeness corrections and hence much lower volume densities for faint z~2-8 galaxies and shallower faint-end slopes than have been derived in many recent studies (by factors of ~2-3 and by dalpha>~0.1-0.3).
  • We present a multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the COSMOS field as part of the observations by the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). The catalog is based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) observations of the COSMOS field (centered at RA: $10^h00^m28^s$, Dec:$+02^{\circ}12^{\prime}21^{\prime\prime}$). The final catalog has 38671 sources with photometric data in forty two bands from UV to the infrared ($\rm \sim 0.3-8\,\mu m$). This includes broad-band photometry from the HST, CFHT, Subaru, VISTA and Spitzer Space Telescope in the visible, near infrared and infrared bands along with intermediate and narrow-band photometry from Subaru and medium band data from Mayall NEWFIRM. Source detection was conducted in the WFC3 F160W band (at $\rm 1.6\,\mu m$) and photometry is generated using the Template FITting algorithm. We further present a catalog of the physical properties of sources as identified in the HST F160W band and measured from the multi-band photometry by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions of sources against templates.
  • Our goal is to study the evolution of the $B-$band luminosity function (LF) since $z=1$ using ALHAMBRA data. We used the photometric redshift and the $I-$band selection magnitude probability distribution functions (PDFs) of those ALHAMBRA galaxies with $I\leq24$ mag to compute the posterior LF. We statistically studied quiescent and star-forming galaxies using the template information encoded in the PDFs. The LF covariance matrix in redshift-magnitude-galaxy type space was computed, including the cosmic variance. That was estimated from the intrinsic dispersion of the LF measurements in the 48 ALHAMBRA sub-fields. The uncertainty due to the photometric redshift prior is also included in our analysis. We modelled the LF with a redshift-dependent Schechter function affected by the same selection effects than the data. The measured ALHAMBRA LF at $0.2\leq z<1$ and the evolving Schechter parameters both for quiescent and star-forming galaxies agree with previous results in the literature. The estimated redshift evolution of $M_B^* \propto Qz$ is $Q_{\rm SF}=-1.03\pm0.08$ and $Q_{\rm Q}=-0.80\pm0.08$, and of $\log \phi^* \propto Pz$ is $P_{\rm SF}=-0.01\pm0.03$ and $P_{\rm Q}=-0.41\pm0.05$. The measured faint-end slopes are $\alpha_{\rm SF}=-1.29\pm0.02$ and $\alpha_{\rm Q}=-0.53\pm0.04$. We find a significant population of faint quiescent galaxies, modelled by a second Schechter function with slope $\beta=-1.31\pm0.11$. We find a factor $2.55\pm0.14$ decrease in the luminosity density $j_B$ of star-forming galaxies, and a factor $1.25\pm0.16$ increase in the $j_B$ of quiescent ones since $z=1$, confirming the continuous build-up of the quiescent population with cosmic time. The contribution of the faint quiescent population to $j_B$ increases from 3% at $z=1$ to 6% at $z=0$. The developed methodology will be applied to future multi-filter surveys such as J-PAS.
  • The original ALHAMBRA catalogue contained over 400,000 galaxies selected using a synthetic F814W image, to the magnitude limit AB(F814W)$\approx$24.5. Given the photometric redshift depth of the ALHAMBRA multiband data (<z>=0.86) and the approximately $I$-band selection, there is a noticeable bias against red objects at moderate redshift. We avoid this bias by creating a new catalogue selected in the $K_s$ band. This newly obtained catalogue is certainly shallower in terms of apparent magnitude, but deeper in terms of redshift, with a significant population of red objects at $z>1$. We select objects using the $K_s$ band images, which reach an approximate AB magnitude limit $K_s \approx 22$. We generate masks and derive completeness functions to characterize the sample. We have tested the quality of the photometry and photometric redshifts using both internal and external checks. Our final catalogue includes $\approx 95,000$ sources down to $K_s \approx 22$, with a significant tail towards high redshift. We have checked that there is a large sample of objects with spectral energy distributions that correspond to that of massive, passively evolving galaxies at $z > 1$, reaching as far as $z \approx 2.5$. We have tested the possibility of combining our data with deep infrared observations at longer wavelengths, particularly Spitzer IRAC data.
  • The deep, wide-area (~800-900 arcmin**2) near-infrared/WFC3/IR + Spitzer/IRAC observations over the CANDELS fields have been a remarkable resource for constraining the bright end of high redshift UV luminosity functions (LFs). However, the lack of HST 1.05-micron observations over the CANDELS fields has made it difficult to identify z~9-10 sources robustly, since such data are needed to confirm the presence of an abrupt Lyman break at 1.2 microns. We report here on the successful identification of many such z~9-10 sources from a new HST program (z9-CANDELS) that targets the highest-probability z~9-10 galaxy candidates with observations at 1.05 microns, to search for a robust Lyman-break at 1.2 microns. The potential z~9-10 candidates are preselected from the full HST, Spitzer/IRAC S-CANDELS observations, and the deepest-available ground-based optical+near-infrared observations. We identified 15 credible z~9-10 galaxies over the CANDELS fields. Nine of these galaxies lie at z~9 and 5 are new identifications. Our targeted follow-up strategy has proven to be very efficient in making use of scarce HST time to secure a reliable sample of z~9-10 galaxies. Through extensive simulations, we replicate the selection process for our sample (both the preselection and follow-up) and use it to improve current estimates for the volume density of bright z~9 and z~10 galaxies. The volume densities we find are 5(-2)(+3)x and 8(-3)(+9)x lower, respectively, than found at z~8. When compared with the best-fit evolution (i.e., dlog_{10} rho(UV)/dz=-0.29+/-0.02) in the UV luminosities densities from z~8 to z~4 integrated to 0.3L*(z=3) (-20 mag), these luminosity densities are 2.6(-0.9)(+1.5)x and 2.2(-1.1)(+2.0)x lower, respectively, than the extrapolated trends. Our new results are broadly consistent with the "accelerated evolution" scenario at z>8, as seen in many theoretical models.
  • Galaxies represent one of the preferred candidate sources to drive the reionization of the universe. Even as gains are made in mapping the galaxy UV luminosity density to z>6, significant uncertainties remain regarding the conversion to the implied ionizing emissivity. The relevant unknowns are the Lyman-continuum (LyC) photon production efficiency xi_{ion} and the escape fraction f_{esc}. As we show here, the first of these unknowns is directly measureable in z=4-5 galaxies, based on the impact the Halpha line has on the observed IRAC fluxes. By computing a LyC photon production rate from the implied Halpha luminosities for a broad selection of z=4-5 galaxies and comparing this against the dust-corrected UV-continuum luminosities, we provide the first-ever direct estimates of the LyC photon production efficiency xi_{ion} for the z>~4 galaxy population. We find log_{10} xi_{ion}/[Hz/ergs] to have a mean value of 25.27_{-0.03}^{+0.03} and 25.34_{-0.02}^{+0.02} for sub-L* z=4-5 galaxies adopting Calzetti and SMC dust laws, respectively. Reassuringly, both values are consistent with standardly assumed xi_{ion}'s in reionization models, with a slight preference for higher xi_{ion}'s (by ~0.1 dex) adopting the SMC dust law. A modest ~0.03-dex increase in these estimates would result if the escape fraction for ionizing photons is non-zero and galaxies dominate the ionizing emissivity at z~4.4. High values of xi_{ion} (~25.5-25.8 dex) are derived for the bluest galaxies (beta<-2.3) in our samples, independent of dust law and consistent with results for a z=7.045 galaxy. Such elevated values of xi_{ion} would have important consequences, indicating that f_{esc} cannot be in excess of 13% unless the galaxy UV luminosity function does not extend down to -13 mag or the clumping factor is greater than 3. A low escape fraction would fit well with the low rate of LyC leakage observed at z~3.
  • We identify 4 unusually bright (H < 25.5) galaxies from HST and Spitzer CANDELS data with probable redshifts z ~ 7-9. These identifications include the brightest-known galaxies to date at z > 7.5. As Y-band observations are not available over the full CANDELS program to perform a standard Lyman-break selection of z > 7 galaxies, we employ an alternate strategy using deep Spitzer/IRAC data. We identify z ~ 7.1 - 9.1 galaxies by selecting z >~ 6 galaxies from the HST CANDELS data that show quite red IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] colors, indicating strong [OIII]+Hbeta lines in the 4.5 micron band. This selection strategy was validated using a modest sample for which we have deep Y-band coverage, and subsequently used to select the brightest z > 7 sources. Applying the IRAC criteria to all HST-selected optical-dropout galaxies over the full ~900 arcmin**2 of the CANDELS survey revealed four unusually bright z ~ 7.1, 7.6, 7.9 and 8.6 candidates. The median [3.6]-[4.5] color of our selected z ~ 7.1-9.1 sample is consistent with rest-frame [OIII]+Hbeta EWs of ~1500A, in the [4.5] band. Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopy has been independently reported for two of our selected sources, showing Ly-alpha at redshifts of 7.7302+/-0.0006 and 8.683^+0.001_-0.004, respectively. We present similar Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopy for a third selected galaxy with a probable 4.7sigma Ly-alpha line at z_spec=7.4770+/-0.0008. All three have H-band magnitudes of ~25 mag and are ~0.5 mag more luminous (M(UV) ~ -22.0) than any previously discovered z ~ 8 galaxy, with important implications for the UV LF. Our 3 brightest, highest redshift z > 7 galaxies all lie within the CANDELS EGS field, providing a dramatic illustration of the potential impact of field-to-field variance.
  • We study the clustering of galaxies as a function of spectral type and redshift in the range $0.35 < z < 1.1$ using data from the Advanced Large Homogeneous Area Medium Band Redshift Astronomical (ALHAMBRA) survey. The data cover 2.381 deg$^2$ in 7 fields, after applying a detailed angular selection mask, with accurate photometric redshifts [$\sigma_z < 0.014(1+z)$] down to $I_{AB} < 24$. From this catalog we draw five fixed number density, redshift-limited bins. We estimate the clustering evolution for two different spectral populations selected using the ALHAMBRA-based photometric templates: quiescent and star-forming galaxies. For each sample, we measure the real-space clustering using the projected correlation function. Our calculations are performed over the range $[0.03,10.0] h^{-1}$ Mpc, allowing us to find a steeper trend for $r_p \lesssim 0.2 h^{-1}$ Mpc, which is especially clear for star-forming galaxies. Our analysis also shows a clear early differentiation in the clustering properties of both populations: star-forming galaxies show weaker clustering with evolution in the correlation length over the analysed redshift range, while quiescent galaxies show stronger clustering already at high redshifts, and no appreciable evolution. We also perform the bias calculation where similar segregation is found, but now it is among the quiescent galaxies where a growing evolution with redshift is clearer. These findings clearly corroborate the well known colour-density relation, confirming that quiescent galaxies are mainly located in dark matter halos that are more massive than those typically populated by star-forming galaxies.
  • The IRAC ultradeep field (IUDF) and IRAC Legacy over GOODS (IGOODS) programs are two ultradeep imaging surveys at 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). The primary aim is to directly detect the infrared light of reionization epoch galaxies at z > 7 and to constrain their stellar populations. The observations cover the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), including the two HUDF parallel fields, and the CANDELS/GOODS-South, and are combined with archival data from all previous deep programs into one ultradeep dataset. The resulting imaging reaches unprecedented coverage in IRAC 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m ranging from > 50 hour over 150 arcmin^2, > 100 hour over 60 sq arcmin2, to 200 hour over 5 - 10 arcmin$^2$. This paper presents the survey description, data reduction, and public release of reduced mosaics on the same astrometric system as the CANDELS/GOODS-South WFC3 data. To facilitate prior-based WFC3+IRAC photometry, we introduce a new method to create high signal-to-noise PSFs from the IRAC data and reconstruct the complex spatial variation due to survey geometry. The PSF maps are included in the release, as are registered maps of subsets of the data to enable reliability and variability studies. Simulations show that the noise in the ultradeep IRAC images decreases approximately as the square root of integration time over the range 20 - 200 hours, well below the classical confusion limit, reaching 1{\sigma} point source sensitivities as faint as of 15 nJy (28.5 AB) at 3.6{\mu}m and 18 nJy (28.3 AB) at 4.5{\mu}m. The value of such ultradeep IRAC data is illustrated by direct detections of z = 7 - 8 galaxies as faint as HAB = 28.
  • We have developed a new method, close in philosophy to the photometric redshift technique, which can be applied to spectral data of very low signal-to-noise ratio. Using it we intend to measure redshifts while minimising the dangers posed by the usual extraction techniques. GRB afterglows have generally very simple optical spectra over which the separate effects of absorption and reddening in the GRB host, the intergalactic medium, and our own Galaxy are superimposed. We model all these effects over a series of template afterglow spectra to produce a set of clean spectra that reproduce what would reach our telescope. We also model carefully the effects of the telescope-spectrograph combination and the properties of noise in the data, which are then applied on the template spectra. The final templates are compared to the two-dimensional spectral data, and the basic parameters (redshift, spectral index, Hydrogen absorption column) are estimated using statistical tools. We show how our method works by applying it to our data of the NIR afterglow of GRB090423. At z ~ 8.2, this was the most distant object ever observed. We use the spectrum taken by our team with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo to derive the GRB redshift and its intrinsic neutral Hydrogen column density. Our best fit yields z=8.4^+0.05/-0.03 and N(HI)<5x10^20 cm^-2, but with a highly non-Gaussian uncertainty including the redshift range z [6.7, 8.5] at the 2-sigma confidence level. Our method will be useful to maximise the recovered information from low-quality spectra, particularly when the set of possible spectra is limited or easily parameterisable while at the same time ensuring an adequate confidence analysis.
  • Context: Multiwavelength observations of gamma-ray burst prompt and afterglow emission are a key tool to disentangle the various possible emission processes and scenarios proposed to interpret the complex gamma-ray burst phenomenology. Aims: We collected a large dataset on GRB060908 in order to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the prompt emission as well as the early and late afterglow. Methods: Data from Swift-BAT, -XRT and -UVOT together with data from a number of different ground-based optical/NIR and millimeter telescopes allowed us to follow the afterglow evolution from about a minute from the high-energy event down to the host galaxy limit. We discuss the physical parameters required to model these emissions. Results: The prompt emission of GRB060908 was characterized by two main periods of activity, spaced by a few seconds of low intensity, with a tight correlation between activity and spectral hardness. Observations of the afterglow began less than one minute after the high-energy event, when it was already in a decaying phase, and it was characterized by a rather flat optical/NIR spectrum which can be interpreted as due to a hard energy-distribution of the emitting electrons. On the other hand, the X-ray spectrum of the afterglow could be fit by a rather soft electron distribution. Conclusions: GRB060908 is a good example of a gamma-ray burst with a rich multi-wavelength set of observations. The availability of this dataset, built thanks to the joint efforts of many different teams, allowed us to carry out stringent tests for various interpretative scenarios showing that a satisfactorily modeling of this event is challenging. In the future, similar efforts will enable us to obtain optical/NIR coverage comparable in quality and quantity to the X-ray data for more events, therefore opening new avenues to progress gamma-ray burst research.
  • The approach of Observational Astronomy is mainly aimed at the construction of larger aperture telescopes, more sensitive detectors and broader wavelength coverage. Certainly fruitful, this approach turns out to be not completely fulfilling the needs when phenomena related to the formation of black holes (BH), neutron stars (NS) and relativistic stars in general are concerned. Recently, mainly through the Vela, Beppo-SAX and Swift satellites, we reached a reasonable knowledge of the most violent events in the Universe and of some of the processes we believe are leading to the formation of black holes (BH). We plan to open a new window of opportunity to study the variegated physics of very fast astronomical transients, particularly the one related to extreme compact objects. The innovative approach is based on three cornerstones: 1) the design (the conceptual design has been already completed) of a 3m robotic telescope and related focal plane instrumentation characterized by the unique features: "No telescope points faster"; 2) simultaneous multi-wavelengths observations (photometry, spectroscopy o\& polarimetry); 3) high time resolution observations. The conceptual design of the telescope and related instrumentation is optimized to address the following topics: High frequency a-periodic variability, Polarization, High z GRBs, Short GRBs, GRB-Supernovae association, Multi-wavelengths simultaneous photometry and rapid low dispersion spectroscopy. This experiment will turn the "exception" (like the optical observations of GRB 080319B) to "routine".
  • Gamma-ray burst are thought to be produced by highly relativistic outflows. Although upper and lower limits for the outflow initial Lorentz factor $\Gamma_0$ are available, observational efforts to derive a direct determination of $\Gamma_0$ have so far failed or provided ambiguous results. As a matter of fact, the shape of the early-time afterglow light curve is strongly sensitive on $\Gamma_0$ which determines the time of the afterglow peak, i.e. when the outflow and the shocked circumburst material share a comparable amount of energy. We now comment early-time observations of the near-infrared afterglows of GRB 060418 and GRB 060607A performed by the REM robotic telescope. For both events, the afterglow peak was singled out and allowed us to determine the initial fireball Lorentz, $\Gamma_0\sim 400$.
  • The Variable Star One-shot Project (VSOP) is aimed at (1) providing the variability type and spectral type of all unstudied variable stars, (2) process, publish, and make the data available as automatically as possible, and (3) generate serendipitous discoveries. This first paper describes the project itself, the acquisition of the data, the dataflow, the spectroscopic analysis and the on-line availability of the fully calibrated and reduced data. We also present the results on the 221 stars observed during the first semester of the project. We used the high-resolution echelle spectrographs HARPS and FEROS in the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) to survey known variable stars. Once reduced by the dedicated pipelines, the radial velocities are determined from cross correlation with synthetic template spectra, and the spectral types are determined by an automatic minimum distance matching to synthetic spectra, with traditional manual spectral typing cross-checks. The variability types are determined by manually evaluating the available light curves and the spectroscopy. In the future, a new automatic classifier, currently being developed by members of the VSOP team, based on these spectroscopic data and on the photometric classifier developed for the COROT and Gaia space missions, will be used. We confirm or revise spectral types of 221 variable stars from the GCVS. We identify 26 previously unknown multiple systems, among them several visual binaries with spectroscopic binary individual components. We present new individual results for the multiple systems V349 Vel and BC Gru, for the composite spectrum star V4385 Sgr, for the T-Tauri star V1045 Sco, and for DM Boo which we re-classify as a BY Draconis variable. The complete data release can be accessed via the VSOP web site.
  • The Variable Star One-shot Project (VSOP) aimed at providing to the world-wide stellar community the necessary one-shot spectrum of unstudied variable stars, too often classified as such by an analysis of photometric data only. The VSOP has established an new kind of observational model, where all steps from observations to spectral analysis, are automatized (or are underway to be fully automatized). The project is centralized on a collaborative wiki website. The VSOP operational model is very successful, data is continously flowing and being analyszed, and VSOP is now a worldwide open collaboration of people with very different and complementary skills and expertise. The idea of a central wiki website has been extended by one of us to propose a new service to the whole astronomical community, called Wikimbad. Wikimbad is an open wiki website aimed at collecting, organizing and making publicly available all kind of reduced and published astronomical data. Its strengths and a comparison with the Virtual Observatory are discussed. See: http://vsop.sc.eso.org and http://wikimbad.org
  • Gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission is believed to originate in highly relativistic fireballs. Currently, only lower limits were securely set to the initial fireball Lorentz factor Gamma_0. We aim to provide a direct measure of Gamma_0. The early-time afterglow light curve carries information about Gamma_0, which determines the time of the afterglow peak. We have obtained early observations of the near-infrared afterglows of GRB 060418 and GRB 060607A with the REM robotic telescope. For both events, the afterglow peak could be clearly singled out, allowing a firm determination of the fireball Lorentz of Gamma_0 ~ 400, fully confirming the highly relativistic nature of GRB fireballs. The deceleration radius was inferred to be R_dec ~ 10^17 cm. This is much larger than the internal shocks radius (believed to power the prompt emission), thus providing further evidence for a different origin of the prompt and afterglow stages of the GRB.
  • We present ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope optical observations of the X-ray flash (XRF) 020903, covering 300 days. The afterglow showed a very rapid rise in the first day, followed by a relatively slow decay in the next few days. There was a clear bump in the light curve after ~25 days, accompanied by a drastic change in the spectral energy distribution. The light curve and the spectral energy distribution are naturally interpreted as the emergence -- and subsequent decay -- of a supernova (SN), similar to SN 1998bw. At peak luminosity, the SN is estimated to be 0.8 +/- 0.1 mag fainter than SN1998bw. This argues in favor of the existence of a supernova associated with this X-ray flash. A spectrum obtained 35 days after the burst shows emission lines from the host galaxy. We use this spectrum to put an upper limit on the oxygen abundance of the host at [O/H] < -0.6 dex. We also discuss a possible trend between the softness of several bursts and the early behavior of the optical afterglow, in the sense that XRFs and X-ray rich GRBs seem to have a plateau phase or even a rising light curve. This can be naturally explained in models where XRFs are similar to GRBs but seen off the jet axis.
  • Multiband VRIJHK photometry of the Blazar PKS 0537-441 obtained with the REM telescope from December 2004 to March 2005 is presented. A major period of activity is found with more than four magnitudes variability in the V filter in 50 days and of 2.5 in 10 days. In intensity and duration the activity is similar to that of 1972 reported by Eggen (1973), but it is much better documented. No clear evidence of variability on time-scale of minutes is found. The spectral energy distribution is roughly described by a power-law, with the weaker state being the softer.
  • GRB 021004 is one of the best sampled gamma-ray bursts (GRB) to date, although the nature of its light curve is still being debated. Here we present a large amount (107) of new optical, near-infrared (NIR) and millimetre observations, ranging from 2 hours to more than a year after the burst. Fitting the multiband data to a model based on multiple energy injections suggests that at least 7 refreshed shocks took place during the evolution of the afterglow, implying a total energy release (collimated within an angle of 1.8 deg) of ~ 8x10^51 erg. Analysis of the late photometry reveals that the GRB 021004 host is a low extinction (Av ~ 0.1) starburst galaxy with M_B ~ -22.0.
  • We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry of the bright afterglow of GRB 020813. Our data span from 3 hours to 4 days after the GRB event. A rather sharp achromatic break is present in the light curve, 14 hours after the trigger. In the framework of jetted fireballs, this break corresponds to a jet half opening angle of (1.9 +- 0.2) deg, the smallest value ever inferred for a GRB. We discuss our results in the framework of currently available models, and find that they have problems in explaining the joint temporal and spectral properties, and in particular the slow decay before the break.
  • Polarization measurements for the optical counterpart to GRB 020405 are presented and discussed. Our observations were performed with the VLT-UT3 (Melipal) during the second and third night after the gamma-ray burst discovery. The polarization degree (and the position angle) appears to be constant between our two observations at a level around (1.5 - 2)%. The polarization can be intrinsic but it is not possible to unambiguously exclude that a substantial fraction of it is induced by dust in the host galaxy.
  • The results of a CCD survey for variability of stars in the nearby galaxy NGC 6822 are presented. The goal of the survey was to obtain good light curves of Cepheids for Fourier decomposition and to detect shorter period Cepheids. Since the program was carried out with a relatively small telescope, the Dutch 0.9 m at ESO-La Silla, the observations were unfiltered (white light, or Wh-band). The analysis revealed the presence of more than 130 variable stars. 21 population I Cepheids are detected; 6 of them were already known from previous works (Kayser, 1967). For at least three Cepheids, however, the previous identification or period was wrong. Some probable population II (W Vir) stars are also identified. The dispersion of the fundamental mode Cepheid PL relation appears to be small.