• Local massive early-type galaxies are believed to have completed most of their star formation $\sim10$Gyr ago and evolved without having substantial star formation since. If so, their progenitors should have roughly solar stellar metallicities ($Z_*$), comparable to their values today. We report the discovery of two lensed massive ($\log M_*/M_\odot\sim11$), $z\sim2.2$ dead galaxies, that appear markedly metal deficient given this scenario. Using 17-band $HST$+$K_{s}$+$Spitzer$ photometry and deep $HST$ grism spectra from the GLASS and SN Refsdal follow-up campaigns covering features near $\lambda_{\rm rest}\sim4000$\AA, we find these systems to be dominated by A-type stars with $\log Z_*/Z_\odot=-0.40\pm0.02$ and $-0.49\pm0.03$ ($30$-$40\%$ solar) under standard assumptions. The second system's lower metallicity is robust to isochrone changes, though this choice can drive the first system's from $\log Z_*/Z_\odot=-0.6$ to 0.1. If these two galaxies are representative of larger samples, this finding suggests that evolutionary paths other than dry minor-merging are required for these massive galaxies. Future analyses with direct metallicity measurements-e.g., by the $James\ Webb\ Space\ Telescope$-will provide critical insight into the nature of such phenomena.
  • The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) enabled the search for the first galaxies observed at z ~ 8 - 11 (500 - 700 Myr after the Big Bang). To continue quantifying the number density of the most luminous galaxies (M_AB ~ -22.0) at the earliest epoch observable with HST, we search for z ~ 10 galaxies (F125W-dropouts) in archival data from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG[z8]) survey, originally designed for detection of z ~ 8 galaxies (F098M-dropouts). By focusing on the deepest 293 arcmin^2 of the data along 62 independent lines of sight, we identify six z ~ 10 candidates satisfying the color selection criteria, detected at S/N > 8 in F160W with M_AB = -22.8 to -21.1 if at z = 10. Three of the six sources, including the two brightest, are in a single WFC3 pointing (~ 4 arcmin^2), suggestive of significant clustering, which is expected from bright galaxies at z ~ 10. However, the two brightest galaxies are too extended to be likely at z ~ 10, and one additional source is unresolved and possibly a brown dwarf. The remaining three candidates have m_AB ~ 26, and given the area and completeness of our search, our best estimate is a number density of sources that is marginally higher but consistent at 2{\sigma} with searches in legacy fields. Our study highlights that z ~ 10 searches can yield a small number of candidates, making tailored follow-ups of HST pure-parallel observations viable and effective.
  • We present the first results and design from the redshift z~9-10 Brightest of the Reionizing Galaxies {\it Hubble Space Telescope} survey BoRG[z9-10], aimed at searching for intrinsically luminous unlensed galaxies during the first 700 Myr after the Big Bang. BoRG[z9-10] is the continuation of a multi-year pure-parallel near-IR and optical imaging campaign with the Wide Field Camera 3. The ongoing survey uses five filters, optimized for detecting the most distant objects and offering continuous wavelength coverage from {\lambda}=0.35{\mu}m to {\lambda}=1.7{\mu}m. We analyze the initial ~130 arcmin$^2$ of area over 28 independent lines of sight (~25% of the total planned) to search for z>7 galaxies using a combination of Lyman break and photometric redshift selections. From an effective comoving volume of (5-25) $times 10^5$ Mpc$^3$ for magnitudes brighter than $m_{AB}=26.5-24.0$ in the $H_{160}$-band respectively, we find five galaxy candidates at z~8.3-10 detected at high confidence (S/N>8), including a source at z~8.4 with mAB=24.5 (S/N~22), which, if confirmed, would be the brightest galaxy identified at such early times (z>8). In addition, BoRG[z9-10] data yield four galaxies with $7.3 \lesssim z \lesssim 8$. These new Lyman break galaxies with m$\lesssim26.5$ are ideal targets for follow-up observations from ground and space based observatories to help investigate the complex interplay between dark matter growth, galaxy assembly, and reionization.
  • We give an overview of the Grism Lens Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS), a large Hubble Space Telescope program aimed at obtaining grism spectroscopy of the fields of ten massive clusters of galaxies at redshift z=0.308-0.686, including the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF). The Wide Field Camera 3 yields near infrared spectra of the cluster cores, covering the wavelength range 0.81-1.69mum through grisms G102 and G141, while the Advanced Camera for Surveys in parallel mode provides G800L spectra of the infall regions of the clusters. The WFC3 spectra are taken at two almost orthogonal position angles in order to minimize the effects of confusion. After summarizing the scientific drivers of GLASS, we describe the sample selection as well as the observing strategy and data processing pipeline. We then utilize MACSJ0717.5+3745, a HFF cluster and the first one observed by GLASS, to illustrate the data quality and the high-level data products. Each spectrum brighter than H_AB=23 is visually inspected by at least two co-authors and a redshift is measured when sufficient information is present in the spectra. Furthermore, we conducted a thorough search for emission lines through all the GLASS WFC3 spectra with the aim of measuring redshifts for sources with continuum fainter than H_AB=23. We provide a catalog of 139 emission-line based spectroscopic redshifts for extragalactic sources, including three new redshifts of multiple image systems (one probable, two tentative). In addition to the data itself we also release software tools that are helpful to navigate the data.
  • The IRAC ultradeep field (IUDF) and IRAC Legacy over GOODS (IGOODS) programs are two ultradeep imaging surveys at 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). The primary aim is to directly detect the infrared light of reionization epoch galaxies at z > 7 and to constrain their stellar populations. The observations cover the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), including the two HUDF parallel fields, and the CANDELS/GOODS-South, and are combined with archival data from all previous deep programs into one ultradeep dataset. The resulting imaging reaches unprecedented coverage in IRAC 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m ranging from > 50 hour over 150 arcmin^2, > 100 hour over 60 sq arcmin2, to 200 hour over 5 - 10 arcmin$^2$. This paper presents the survey description, data reduction, and public release of reduced mosaics on the same astrometric system as the CANDELS/GOODS-South WFC3 data. To facilitate prior-based WFC3+IRAC photometry, we introduce a new method to create high signal-to-noise PSFs from the IRAC data and reconstruct the complex spatial variation due to survey geometry. The PSF maps are included in the release, as are registered maps of subsets of the data to enable reliability and variability studies. Simulations show that the noise in the ultradeep IRAC images decreases approximately as the square root of integration time over the range 20 - 200 hours, well below the classical confusion limit, reaching 1{\sigma} point source sensitivities as faint as of 15 nJy (28.5 AB) at 3.6{\mu}m and 18 nJy (28.3 AB) at 4.5{\mu}m. The value of such ultradeep IRAC data is illustrated by direct detections of z = 7 - 8 galaxies as faint as HAB = 28.
  • Lyman-Break Galaxy (LBG) samples observed during reionization ($z\gtrsim6$) with Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 are reaching sizes sufficient to characterize their clustering properties. Using a combined catalog from the Hubble eXtreme Deep Field and CANDELS surveys, containing $N=743$ LBG candidates at z>6.5 at a mean redshift of $z=7.2$, we detect a clear clustering signal in the angular correlation function (ACF) at $\sim4\sigma$, corresponding to a real-space correlation length $r_{0}=6.7^{+0.9}_{-1.0}h^{-1}$cMpc. The derived galaxy bias $b=8.6^{+0.9}_{-1.0}$ is that of dark-matter halos of $M=10^{11.1^{+0.2}_{-0.3}}$M$_{\odot}$ at $z=7.2$, and highlights that galaxies below the current detection limit ($M_{AB}\sim-17.7$) are expected in lower-mass halos ($M\sim10^{8}-10^{10.5}$M$_{\odot}$). We compute the ACF of LBGs at $z\sim3.8-z\sim5.9$ in the same surveys. A trend of increasing bias is found from $z=3.8$ ($b\sim3.0$) to $z=7.2$ ($b\sim8.6$), broadly consistent with galaxies at fixed luminosity being hosted in dark-matter halos of similar mass at $4<z<6$, followed by a slight rise in halo masses at $z\sim7$ ($\sim2\sigma$ confidence). Separating the data at the median luminosity of the $z=7.2$ sample ($M_{UV}=-19.4$) shows higher clustering at $z=5.9$ for bright galaxies ($r_{0}=5.5^{+1.4}_{-1.5}h^{-1}$cMpc, $b=6.2^{+1.2}_{-1.5}$) compared to faint galaxies ($r_{0}=1.9^{+1.1}_{-1.0}h^{-1}$cMpc, $b=2.7\pm1.2$) implying a constant mass-to-light ratio $\frac{dlogM}{dlogL}\sim1.2^{+1.8}_{-0.8}$. A similar trend is present in the $z=7.2$ sample with larger uncertainty. Finally, our bias measurements allow us to investigate the fraction of dark-matter halos hosting UV-bright galaxies (the duty-cycle, $\epsilon_{DC}$). At $z=7.2$ values near unity are preferred, which may be explained by the shortened halo assembly time at high-redshift.
  • We present Spitzer/IRAC observations of nine $z'$-band dropouts highly magnified (2<mu<12) by the Bullet Cluster. We combine archival imaging with our Exploratory program (SURFS UP), which results in a total integration time of ~30 hr per IRAC band. We detect (>3sigma) in both IRAC bands the brightest of these high-redshift galaxies, with [3.6]=23.80+-0.28 mag, [4.5]=23.78+-0.25 mag, and (H-[3.6])=1.17+-0.32 mag. The remaining eight galaxies are undetected to [3.6]~26.4 mag and [4.5]~26.0 mag with stellar masses of ~5x10^7 M_sol. The detected galaxy has an estimated magnification of mu=12+-4, which implies this galaxy has an ultraviolet luminosity of L_1500~0.3 L*_{z=7} --- the lowest luminosity individual source detected in IRAC at z>7. By modeling the broadband photometry, we estimate the galaxy has an intrinsic star-formation rate of SFR~1.3 M_sol/yr and stellar mass of M~2x10^9 M_sol, which gives a specific star-formation rate of sSFR~0.7 Gyr^-1. If this galaxy had sustained this star-formation rate since z~20, it could have formed the observed stellar mass (to within a factor of ~2), we also discuss alternate star-formation histories and argue the exponentially-increasing model is unlikely. Finally, based on the intrinsic star-formation rate, we estimate this galaxy has a likely [C II] flux of <f_[C II]> = 10^{-17} erg/s/cm2.
  • We present a new technique to quantify the light contribution coming from the faint high redshift ($z\sim6$) galaxies below the detection threshold of imaging data, set conventionally at S/N=4.5. We illustrate the technique with an application to Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images in the F775W and F850LP filters of the Ultra Deep Field parallel field NICP12. The aim of this analysis is to extend by a few magnitudes the faint end of the luminosity function at $z\sim6$. After masking all the detected sources in the field we apply a Fast Fourier Transform to obtain the spatial power spectrum of the background signal. The power spectrum permits us to separate the background noise signal, the residuals due to the data reduction of the wide field, and the overall signal produced by faint galaxies. The ratio of the signal in the i_775 and z_850 bands is used to estimate the contribution of the faint i-dropout objects. We rely on extensive Monte Carlo simulations to characterize various sources of uncertainty and quantify the number of faint i-dropout galaxies in the field. The analysis allows us to put constraints on the luminosity function at $z\sim6$ down to z_850= 30 mag, 2.5 mag fainter than with standard techniques on the same data. The data are consistent with a faint end slope of the luminosity function of $\alpha = -1.9$. Assuming a specific set of values for the clumping factor, escape fraction, and spectral energy distribution, we find that the $z\sim6$ undetected galaxies down to z_850=30 mag could have driven cosmic reionization.
  • We report the discovery of 33 Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z~8 detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging as part of the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) pure-parallel survey. The ongoing BoRG survey currently has the largest area (274 arcmin^2) with Y_098 (or Y_105), J_125, and H_160 band coverage needed to search for z~8 galaxies, about three times the current CANDELS area, and slightly larger than what will be the final CANDELS wide component with Y_105 data. Our sample of 33 relatively bright Y_098-dropout galaxies have J_125 band magnitudes between 25.5 and 27.4 mag. This is the largest sample of bright (J_125 <~ 27.4) z~8 galaxy candidates presented to date. Combining our dataset with the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF09) dataset, we constrain the rest-frame ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function at z~8 over the widest dynamic range currently available. The combined datasets are well fitted by a Schechter function, i.e. \phi(L) = \phi_* (L/L_*)^{\alpha}\ e^{-(L/L_*)}, without evidence for an excess of sources at the bright end. At 68% confidence, we derive \phi_* = (4.3^{+3.5}_{-2.1}) \times 10^{-4} Mpc^{-3}, M_* = -20.26^{+0.29}_{-0.34}, and a very steep faint-end slope \alpha = -1.98^{+0.23}_{-0.22}. While the best-fit parameters still have a strong degeneracy, especially between \phi_* and M_*, our improved coverage at the bright end has reduced the uncertainty of the faint-end power-law slope at z~8 compared to the best previous determination at +/-0.4. With a future expansion of the BoRG survey, combined with planned ultradeep WFC3/IR observations, it will be possible to further reduce this uncertainty and clearly demonstrate the steepening of the faint-end slope compared to measurements at lower redshift, thereby confirming the key role played by small galaxies in the reionization of the universe.
  • The HUDF09 data are the deepest near-IR observations ever, reaching to 29.5 mag. Luminosity functions (LF) from these new HUDF09 data for 132 z\sim7 and z\sim8 galaxies are combined with new LFs for z\sim5-6 galaxies and the earlier z\sim4 LF to reach to very faint limits (<0.05 L*(z=3)). The faint-end slopes alpha are steep: -1.79+/-0.12 (z\sim5), -1.73+/-0.20 (z\sim6), -2.01+/-0.21 (z\sim7), and -1.91+/-0.32 (z\sim8). Slopes alpha\lesssim-2 lead to formally divergent UV fluxes, though galaxies are not expected to form below \sim-10 AB mag. These results have important implications for reionization. The weighted mean slope at z\sim6-8 is -1.87+/-0.13. For such steep slopes, and a faint-end limit of -10 AB mag, galaxies provide a very large UV ionizing photon flux. While current results show that galaxies can reionize the universe by z\sim6, matching the Thomson optical depths is more challenging. Extrapolating the current LF evolution to z>8, taking alpha to be -1.87+/-0.13 (the mean value at z\sim6-8), and adopting typical parameters, we derive Thomson optical depths of 0.061_{-0.006}^{+0.009}. However, this result will change if the faint-end slope alpha is not constant with redshift. We test this hypothesis and find a weak, though uncertain, trend to steeper slopes at earlier times (dalpha/dz\sim-0.05+/-0.04), that would increase the Thomson optical depths to 0.079_{-0.017}^{+0.063}, consistent with recent WMAP estimates (tau=0.088+/-0.015). It may thus not be necessary to resort to extreme assumptions about the escape fraction or clumping factor. Nevertheless, the uncertainties remain large. Deeper WFC3/IR+ACS observations can further constrain the ionizing flux from galaxies.
  • Theoretical and numerical modeling of dark-matter halo assembly predicts that the most luminous galaxies at high redshift are surrounded by overdensities of fainter companions. We test this prediction with HST observations acquired by our Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey, which identified four very bright z~8 candidates as Y-dropout sources in four of the 23 non-contiguous WFC3 fields observed. We extend here the search for Y-dropouts to fainter luminosities (M_* galaxies with M_AB\sim-20), with detections at >5sigma confidence (compared to >8sigma confidence adopted earlier) identifying 17 new candidates. We demonstrate that there is a correlation between number counts of faint and bright Y-dropouts at >99.84% confidence. Field BoRG58, which contains the best bright z\sim8 candidate (M_AB=-21.3), has the most significant overdensity of faint Y-dropouts. Four new sources are located within 70arcsec (corresponding to 3.1 comoving Mpc at z=8) from the previously known brighter z\sim8 candidate. The overdensity of Y-dropouts in this field has a physical origin to high confidence (p>99.975%), independent of completeness and contamination rate of the Y-dropout selection. We modeled the overdensity by means of cosmological simulations and estimate that the principal dark matter halo has mass M_h\sim(4-7)x10^11Msun (\sim5sigma density peak) and is surrounded by several M_h\sim10^11Msun halos which could host the fainter dropouts. In this scenario, we predict that all halos will eventually merge into a M_h>2x10^14Msun galaxy cluster by z=0. Follow-up observations with ground and space based telescopes are required to secure the z\sim8 nature of the overdensity, discover new members, and measure their precise redshift.
  • We report the discovery of a Compton-thick Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) at z=4.76 in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South. This object was selected as a V-band dropout in HST/ACS images and previously recognized as an AGN from optical spectroscopy. The 4 Ms Chandra observations show a significant (~4.2sigma) X-ray detection at the V-band dropout position. The X-ray source displays a hardness ratio of HR=0.23+-0.24, which, for a source at z~5, is highly suggestive of Compton-thick absorption. The source X-ray spectrum is seen above the background level in the energy range of ~0.9-4 keV, i.e., in the rest-frame energy range of ~5-23 keV. When fixing the photon index to Gamma=1.8, the measured column density is N_H=1.4^{+0.9}_{-0.5} x 10^{24} cm^{-2}, which is Compton-thick. To our knowledge, this is the most distant heavily obscured AGN, confirmed by X-ray spectral analysis, discovered so far. The intrinsic (de-absorbed), rest-frame luminosity in the 2-10 keV band is ~2.5 x 10^{44} erg s^{-1}, which places this object among type-2 quasars. The Spectral Energy Distribution shows that massive star formation is associated with obscured black hole accretion. This system may have then been caught during a major co-eval episode of black hole and stellar mass assembly at early times. The measure of the number density of heavily obscured AGN at high redshifts will be crucial to reconstruct the BH/galaxy evolution history from the beginning.
  • We present the first results on the search for very bright (M_AB -21) galaxies at redshift z~8 from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey. BoRG is a Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 pure-parallel survey that is obtaining images on random lines of sight at high Galactic latitudes in four filters (F606W, F098M, F125W, F160W), with integration times optimized to identify galaxies at z>7.5 as F098M-dropouts. We discuss here results from a search area of approximately 130 arcmin^2 over 23 BoRG fields, complemented by six other pure-parallel WFC3 fields with similar filters. This new search area is more than two times wider than previous WFC3 observations at z~8. We identify four F098M-dropout candidates with high statistical confidence (detected at greater than 8sigma confidence in F125W). These sources are among the brightest candidates currently known at z~8 and approximately ten times brighter than the z=8.56 galaxy UDFy-38135539. They thus represent ideal targets for spectroscopic followup observations and could potentially lead to a redshift record, as our color selection includes objects up to z~9. However, the expected contamination rate of our sample is about 30% higher than typical searches for dropout galaxies in legacy fields, such as the GOODS and HUDF, where deeper data and additional optical filters are available to reject contaminants.
  • We study the clustering properties of the first galaxies formed in the Universe. We find that, due to chemical enrichment of the inter-stellar medium by isolated Population III stars formed in mini-halos at redshift z>30, the (chronologically) first galaxies are composed of metal-poor Population II stars and are highly clustered on small scales. In contrast, chemically pristine galaxies in halos with mass M~10^8 M_sun may form at z<20 in relatively underdense regions of the Universe. This occurs once self-enrichment by Population III in mini-halos is quenched by the build-up of an $H_2$ photo-dissociating radiative background in the Lyman-Werner bands. We find that these chemically pristine galaxies are spatially uncorrelated. Thus, we expect that deep fields with the James Webb Space Telescope may detect clusters of chemically enriched galaxies but individual chemically pristine objects. We predict that metal-free galaxies at 10 <= z <= 15$ have surface densities of about 80 per square arcmin and per unit redshift but most of them will be too faint even for JWST. However, the predicted density makes these objects interesting targets for searches behind lensing clusters.
  • We investigate the Spitzer/IRAC properties of 36 z~7 z-dropout galaxies and 3 z~8 Y-dropout galaxies derived from deep/wide-area WFC3/IR data of the Early Release Science, the ultradeep HUDF09, and wide-area NICMOS data. We fit stellar population synthesis models to the SEDs to derive mean redshifts, stellar masses, and ages. The z~7 galaxies are best characterized by substantial ages (>100 Myr) and M/L_V~0.2. The main trend with decreasing luminosity is that of bluing of the far-UV slope from beta~-2.0 to beta~-3.0. This can be explained by decreasing metallicity, except for the lowest luminosity galaxies (0.1 L*{z=3}), where low metallicity and smooth SFHs fail to match the blue far-UV and moderately red H-[3.6] color. Such colors may require episodic SFHs with short periods of activity and quiescence ("on-off" cycles) and/or a contribution from emission lines. The stellar mass of our sample of z~7 star forming galaxies correlates with SFR according to log M* = 8.70 (+-0.09) + 1.06(+-0.10) log SFR, implying star formation may have commenced at z>10. No galaxies are found with SFRs much higher or lower than the past averaged SFR suggesting that the typical star formation timescales are probably a substantial fraction of the Hubble time. We report the first IRAC detection of Y-dropout galaxies at z~8. The average rest-frame U-V=0.3 (AB) of the 3 galaxies are similar to faint z~7 galaxies, implying similar M/L. The stellar mass density to M_{UV,AB}<-18 is rho*(z=8) = 1.8^{+0.7}_{-1.0} x 10^6 M_sun Mpc^-3, following log rho*(z)= 10.6(+-0.6) - 4.4(+-0.7) log(1+z) [M_sun Mpc^-3] over 3<z< 8.
  • The new Wide Field Camera 3/IR observations on the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field started investigating the properties of galaxies during the reionization epoch. To interpret these observations, we present a novel approach inspired by the conditional luminosity function method. We calibrate our model to observations at z=6 and assume a non-evolving galaxy luminosity versus halo mass relation. We first compare model predictions against the luminosity function measured at z=5 and z=4. We then predict the luminosity function at z>=7 under the sole assumption of evolution in the underlying dark-matter halo mass function. Our model is consistent with the observed z>6.5 galaxy number counts in the HUDF survey and suggests a possible steepening of the faint-end slope of the luminosity function: alpha(z>8)< -1.9 compared to alpha=-1.74 at z=6. Although we currently see only the brightest galaxies, a hidden population of lower luminosity objects (L/L_{*}> 10^{-4}) might provide >75% of the total reionizing flux. Assuming escape fraction f_{esc}~0.2, clumping factor C~5, top heavy-IMF and low metallicity, galaxies below the detection limit produce complete reionization at z>8. For solar metallicity and normal stellar IMF, reionization finishes at z>6, but a smaller C/f_{esc} is required for an optical depth consistent with the WMAP measurement. Our model highlights that the star formation rate in sub-L_* galaxies has a quasi-linear relation to dark-matter halo mass, suggesting that radiative and mechanical feedback were less effective at z>6 than today.
  • We utilize the newly-acquired, ultra-deep WFC3/IR observations over the HUDF to search for star-forming galaxies at z~8-8.5, only 600 million years from recombination, using a Y_{105}-dropout selection. The new 4.7 arcmin**2 WFC3/IR observations reach to ~28.8 AB mag (5 sigma) in the Y_{105}J_{125}H_{160} bands. These remarkable data reach ~1.5 AB mag deeper than the previous data over the HUDF, and now are an excellent match to the HUDF optical ACS data. For our search criteria, we use a two-color Lyman-Break selection technique to identify z~8-8.5 Y_{105}-dropouts. We find 5 likely z~8-8.5 candidates. The sources have H_{160}-band magnitudes of ~28.3 AB mag and very blue UV-continuum slopes, with a median estimated beta of <~-2.5 (where f_{\lambda}\propto \lambda^{\beta}). This suggests that z~8 galaxies are not only essentially dust free but also may have very young ages or low metallicities. The observed number of Y_{105}-dropout candidates is smaller than the 20+/-6 sources expected assuming no evolution from z~6, but is consistent with the 5 expected extrapolating the Bouwens et al. 2008 LF results to z~8. These results provide evidence that the evolution in the LF seen from z~7 to z~3 continues to z~8. The remarkable improvement in the sensitivity of WFC3/IR has enabled HST to cross a threshold, revealing star-forming galaxies at z~8-9.
  • We study the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) mid-infrared (rest-frame optical) fluxes of 14 newly WFC3/IR-detected z=7 z_{850}-dropout galaxies and 5 z=8 Y_{105}-dropout galaxies. The WFC3/IR depth and spatial resolution allow accurate removal of contaminating foreground light, enabling reliable flux measurements at 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron. None of the galaxies are detected to [3.6]=26.9 (AB, 2 sigma), but a stacking analysis reveals a robust detection for the z_{850}-dropouts and an upper limit for the Y_{105}-dropouts. We construct average broadband SEDs using the stacked ACS, WFC3, and IRAC fluxes and fit stellar population synthesis models to derive mean redshifts, stellar masses, and ages. For the z_{850}-dropouts, we find z=6.9^{+0.1}_{-0.1}, (U-V)_{rest}=0.4, reddening A_V=0, stellar mass M*=1.2^{+0.3}_{-0.6} x 10^9 M_sun (Salpeter IMF). The best-fit ages ~300Myr, M/L_V=0.2, and SSFR=1.7Gyr^{-1} are similar to values reported for luminous z=7 galaxies, indicating the galaxies are smaller but not younger. The sub-L* galaxies observed here contribute significantly to the stellar mass density and under favorable conditions may have provided enough photons for sustained reionization at 7<z<11. In contrast, the z=8.3^{+0.1}_{-0.2} Y_{105}-dropouts have stellar masses that are uncertain by 1.5 dex due to the near-complete reliance on far-UV data. Adopting the 2 sigma upper limit on the M/L(z=8), the stellar mass density to M_{UV,AB} < -18 declines from rho*(z=7)=3.7^{+1.0}_{-1.8} x 10^6 M_sun Mpc^{-3} to rho*(z=8) < 8 x 10^5 M_sun Mpc^{-3}, following (1+z)^{-6} over 3<z<8. Lower masses at z=8 would signify more dramatic evolution, which can be established with deeper IRAC observations, long before the arrival of the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • We present a first morphological study of z~7-8 Lyman Break galaxies (LBGs) from Oesch et al. 2009 and Bouwens et al. 2009 detected in ultra-deep near-infrared imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep field (HUDF) by the HUDF09 program. With an average intrinsic size of 0.7+-0.3 kpc these galaxies are found to be extremely compact having an average observed surface brightness of mu_J ~= 26 mag arcsec^(-2), and only two out of the full sample of 16 z~7 galaxies show extended features with resolved double cores. By comparison to lower redshift LBGs it is found that only little size evolution takes place from z~7 to z~6, while galaxies between z~4-5 show more extended wings in their apparent profiles. The average size scales as (1+z)^(-m) with m=1.12+-0.17 for galaxies with luminosities in the range (0.3-1)L*_{z=3} and with m=1.32+-0.52 for (0.12-0.3)L*_{z=3}, consistent with galaxies having constant comoving sizes. The peak of the size distribution changes only slowly from z~7 to z~4. However, a tail of larger galaxies (>~ 1.2 kpc) is gradually built up towards later cosmic times, possibly via hierarchical build-up or via enhanced accretion of cold gas. Additionally, the average star-formation surface density of LBGs with luminosities (0.3-1)L*_{z=3} is nearly constant at Sigma_{SFR}=1.9 Msun/yr/kpc^2 over the entire redshift range z~4-7 suggesting similar star-formation efficiencies at these early epochs. The above evolutionary trends seem to hold out to z~8 though the sample is still small and possibly incomplete.
  • We present a sample of 16 robust z~7 z-drop galaxies detected by the newly installed WFC3/IR camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. Our analysis is based on the first epoch data of the HUDF09 program covering the Hubble Ultra Deep Field with 60 orbits of Y, J, and H observations. These remarkable data cover 4.7 arcmin^2 and are the deepest NIR images ever taken, reaching to ~29 mag AB (5 sigma). The 16 z~6.5-7.5 galaxies have been identified based on the Lyman Break technique utilizing (z-Y) vs. (Y-J) colors. They have magnitudes J = 26.0-29.0 (AB), an average apparent half-light radius of ~0.16 arcsec (<~1 kpc), and show very blue colors (some even beta<~-2.5), in particular at low luminosities. The WFC3/IR data confirms previous NICMOS detections indicating that the dropout selection at z~7 is very reliable. Our data allow a first determination of the faint end slope of the z~7 luminosity function, reaching down to M_UV ~ -18, a full magnitude fainter than previous measurements. When fixing phi*=1.4e-3/Mpc^3/mag to the value previously measured at z~6, we find a best-fit value of alpha=-1.77+-0.20, with a characteristic luminosity of M_*=-19.91+-0.09. This steep slope is similar to what is seen at z~2-6 and indicates that low luminosity galaxies could potentially provide adequate flux to reionize the universe. The remarkable depth and resolution of these new images provide insights into the coming power of JWST.
  • One of the main themes in extragalactic astronomy for the next decade will be the evolution of galaxies over cosmic time. Many future observatories, including JWST, ALMA, GMT, TMT and E-ELT will intensively observe starlight over a broad redshift range, out to the dawn of the modern Universe when the first galaxies formed. It has, however, become clear that the properties and evolution of galaxies are intimately linked to the growth of their central black holes. Understanding the formation of galaxies, and their subsequent evolution, will therefore be incomplete without similarly intensive observations of the accretion light from supermassive black holes (SMBH) in galactic nuclei. To make further progress, we need to chart the formation of typical SMBH at z>6, and their subsequent growth over cosmic time, which is most effectively achieved with X-ray observations. Recent technological developments in X-ray optics and instrumentation now bring this within our grasp, enabling capabilities fully matched to those expected from flagship observatories at longer wavelengths.
  • [Abridged] We detect three (plus one less certain) z-dropout sources in two separate fields of our UDF05 HST NICMOS images. These z~7 Lyman-Break Galaxy (LBG) candidates allow us to constrain the Luminosity Function (LF) of the star forming galaxy population at those epochs. By assuming a change in only M* and adopting a linear evolution in redshift, anchored to the measured values at z~6, the best fit evolution coefficient is found to be 0.43+-0.19 mag per unit redshift (0.36+-0.18, if including all four candidates), which provides a value of M*(z=7.2)=-19.7+-0.3. This implies a steady evolution for the LBG LF out to z~7, at the same rate that is observed throughout the z~3 to 6 period. This puts a strong constraint on the star-formation histories of z~6 galaxies, whose ensemble star-formation rate density must be lower by a factor 2 at ~170 Myr before the epoch at which they are observed. In particular, a large fraction of stars in the z~6 LBG population must form at redshifts well above z~7. Extrapolating this steady evolution of the LF out to higher redshifts, we estimate that galaxies would be able to reionize the universe by z~6, provided that the faint-end slope of the z>7 LF steepens to alpha~-1.9, and that faint galaxies, with luminosities below the current detection limits, contribute a substantial fraction of the required ionizing photons. This scenario gives however an integrated optical depth to electron scattering that is ~2sigma below the WMAP-5 measurement. Therefore, altogether, our results indicate that, should galaxies be the primary contributors to reionization, either the currently detected evolution of the galaxy population slows down at z>7, or the LF evolution must be compensated by a decrease in metallicity and a corresponding increase in ionization efficiency at these early epochs.
  • Near-infrared (hereafter NIR) data may provide complementary information to the traditional optical population synthesis analysis of unresolved stellar populations because the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies in the 1-2.5\mum range is dominated by different types of stars than at optical wavelengths. Furthermore, NIR data are subjected to less absorption and hence could constrain the stellar populations in dust-obscured galaxies. We want to develop observational constraints on the stellar populations of unresolved stellar systems in the NIR. To achieve this goal we need a benchmark sample of NIR spectra of ``simple'' early-type galaxies, to be used for testing and calibrating the outputs of population synthesis models. We obtained low-resolution (R~1000) long-slit spectra between 1.5 and 2.4\mum for 14 nearby early-type galaxies using SofI at NTT and higher resolution (R~3000) long-slit spectra, centered at the MgI at ~1.51\mum for a heterogeneous sample of 5 nearby galaxies observed with ISAAC at VLT. We defined spectral indices for CO, NaI, CaI and MgI features and measured the strengths of these features in the sample galaxies. We defined a new global NIR metallicity index, suitable for abundance measurements in low-resolution spectra. Finally, we present an average NIR spectrum of an early-type galaxy, built from a homogenized subset of our sample. The NIR spectra of the sample galaxies show great similarity and the strength of some features does correlate with the iron abundance [Fe/H] and optical metal features of the galaxies. The data suggest that the NIR metal features, in combination with a hydrogen absorption feature may be able to break the age-metallicity degeneracy just like the Mg and Fe features in the optical wavelength range.
  • A number of recent numerical investigations concluded that the remnants of rare structures formed at very high redshift, such as the very first stars and bright redshift z~6 QSOs, are preferentially located at the center of the most massive galaxy clusters at redshift z=0. In this paper we readdress this question using a combination of cosmological simulations of structure formation and extended Press-Schechter formalism and we show that the typical remnants of Population III stars are instead more likely to be found in a group environment, that is in dark matter halos of mass ~2x10^{13} h^{-1}M_sun. Similarly, the descendants of the brightest z~6 QSOs are expected to be in medium-sized clusters (mass of a few 10^{14} h^{-1}M_sun), rather than in the most massive superclusters (M>10^{15} h^{-1}M_sun) found within the typical 1 Gpc^3 cosmic volume where a bright z~6 QSO lives. The origin of past claims that the most massive clusters preferentially host these remnants is rooted in the numerical method used to initialize their numerical simulations: Only a small region of the cosmological volume of interest was simulated with sufficient resolution to identify low-mass halos at early times, and this region was chosen to host the most massive halo in the cosmological volume at late times. The conclusion that the earliest structures formed in the entire cosmological volume evolve into the most massive halo at late times was thus arrived at by construction. We demonstrate that, to the contrary, the first structures to form in a cosmological region evolve into relatively typical objects at later times. We propose alternative numerical methods for simulating the earliest structures in cosmological volumes.
  • We describe the scientific motivations, the mission concept and the instrumentation of SPACE, a class-M mission proposed for concept study at the first call of the ESA Cosmic-Vision 2015-2025 planning cycle. SPACE aims to produce the largest three-dimensional evolutionary map of the Universe over the past 10 billion years by taking near-IR spectra and measuring redshifts for more than half a billion galaxies at 0<z<2 down to AB~23 over 3\pi sr of the sky. In addition, SPACE will also target a smaller sky field, performing a deep spectroscopic survey of millions of galaxies to AB~26 and at 2<z<10+. These goals are unreachable with ground-based observations due to the ~500 times higher sky background. To achieve the main science objectives, SPACE will use a 1.5m diameter Ritchey-Chretien telescope equipped with a set of arrays of Digital Micro-mirror Devices (DMDs) covering a total field of view of 0.4 deg2, and will perform large-multiplexing multi-object spectroscopy (e.g. ~6000 targets per pointing) at a spectral resolution of R~400 as well as diffraction-limited imaging with continuous coverage from 0.8mum to 1.8mum.