• The Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is a multiwavelength Cycle 21 Treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope. It studied 50 nearby star-forming galaxies in five bands from the near UV to the I-band, combining new Wide Field Camera 3 observations with archival Advanced Camera for Surveys data. LEGUS was designed to investigate how star formation occurs and develops on both small and large scales, and how it relates to the galactic environments. In this paper we present the photometric catalogs for all the apparently single stars identified in the 50 LEGUS galaxies. Photometric catalogs and mosaicked images for all filters are available for download. We present optical and near UV color-magnitude diagrams for all the galaxies. For each galaxy we derived the distance from the tip of the red giant branch. We then used the NUV color-magnitude diagrams to identify stars more massive than 14 Mo, and compared their number with the number of massive stars expected from the GALEX FUV luminosity. Our analysis shows that the fraction of massive stars forming in star clusters and stellar associations is about constant with the star formation rate. This lack of a relation suggests that the time scale for evaporation of unbound structures is comparable or longer than 10 Myr. At low star formation rates this translates to an excess of mass in clustered environments as compared to model predictions of cluster evolution, suggesting that a significant fraction of stars form in unbound systems.
  • We study the surface brightness profiles of disc galaxies in the 3.6 micron images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) and K_s-band images from the Near Infrared S0-Sa galaxy Survey (NIRS0S). We particularly connect properties of single exponential (type I), downbending double exponential (type II), and upbending double exponential (type III) disc profile types, to structural components of galaxies by using detailed morphological classifications, and size measurements of rings and lenses. We also study how the local environment of the galaxies affects the profile types by calculating parameters describing the environmental density and the tidal interaction strength. We find that in majority of type II profiles the break radius is connected with structural components such as rings, lenses, and spirals. The exponential disc sections of all three profile types, when considered separately, follow the disc scaling relations. However, the outer discs of type II, and the inner discs of type III, are similar in scalelength to the single exponential discs. Although the different profile types have similar mean environmental parameters, the scalelengths of the type III profiles show a positive correlation with the tidal interaction strength.
  • Resonance rings are the consequence of secular evolution processes that redistribute material and angular momentum in discs. We produced a Catalogue and an Atlas of the rings detected in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) and to conduct a statistical study of the data in the Catalogue. We traced the contours of rings previously identified by Buta et al. (in preparation) and fitted them with ellipses. We found the orientation of bars by studying the galaxy ellipse fits from S4G's Pipeline 4. We used the galaxy orientation data obtained by S4G's Pipeline 4 to obtain intrinsic ellipticities and orientations of rings and the bars. ARRAKIS contains data on 724 ringed galaxies in the S4G. The frequency of resonance rings in the S4G is of 16+-1% and 35+-1% for outer and inner features, respectively. Outer rings are mostly found in Hubble stages -1<=T<=4. Inner rings are found in a distribution that covers the range -1<=T<=7. We confirm that outer rings have two preferred orientations, parallel and perpendicular to the bar. We confirm a tendency for inner rings to be oriented parallel to the bar, but we find that a significant fraction (~50%) of them have random orientations with respect to the bar. These misaligned inner rings are mostly found in late-type galaxies (T>=4). This may be due to spiral modes decoupled from the bar dominating the Fourier amplitude spectrum at the radius of the inner ring. We find that the fraction of barred galaxies hosting outer (inner) rings is ~1.7 times (~1.3 times) that in unbarred galaxies. The fact that rings are only mildly favoured by bars suggests that those in unbarred galaxies either formed due to weak departures from the axisymmetry of the galactic potential or that they are born because of bars that have been destroyed after the ring formation.
  • The MIRI Si:As IBC detector arrays extend the heritage technology from the Spitzer IRAC arrays to a 1024 x 1024 pixel format. We provide a short discussion of the principles of operation, design, and performance of the individual MIRI detectors, in support of a description of their operation in arrays provided in an accompanying paper (Ressler et al. (2015)). We then describe modeling of their response. We find that electron diffusion is an important component of their performance, although it was omitted in previous models. Our new model will let us optimize the bias voltage while avoiding avalanche gain. It also predicts the fraction of the IR-active layer that is depleted (and thus contributes to the quantum efficiency) as signal is accumulated on the array amplifier. Another set of models accurately predicts the nonlinearity of the detector-amplifier unit and has guided determination of the corrections for nonlinearity. Finally, we discuss how diffraction at the interpixel gaps and total internal reflection can produce the extended cross-like artifacts around images with these arrays at short wavelengths, ~ 5 microns. The modeling of the behavior of these devices is helping optimize how we operate them and also providing inputs to the development of the data pipeline.
  • We combine data from the Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S$^4$G), a recently calibrated empirical stellar mass estimator from Eskew et al., and an extensive database of HI spectral line profiles to examine the baryonic Tully-Fisher (BTF) relation. We find 1) that the BTF has lower scatter than the classic Tully-Fisher (TF) relation and is better described as a linear relationship, confirming similar previous results, 2) that the inclusion of a radial scale in the BTF decreases the scatter but only modestly, as seen previously for the TF relation, and 3) that the slope of the BTF, which we find to be $3.5\pm 0.2$ ($\Delta$ log $M_{baryon}/\Delta$ log $v_c$), implies that on average a nearly constant fraction ($\sim 0.4$) of all baryons expected to be in a halo are "condensed" onto the central region of rotationally supported galaxies. The condensed baryon fraction, $M_{baryon}/M_{total}$, is, to our measurement precision, nearly independent of galaxy circular velocity (our sample spans circular velocities, $v_c$, between 60 and 250 km s$^{-1}$, but is extended to $v_c\sim 10$ km s$^{-1}$ using data from the literature). The observed galaxy-to-galaxy scatter in this fraction is generally $\le$ a factor of 2 despite fairly liberal selection criteria. These results imply that cooling and heating processes, such as cold vs. hot accretion, mass loss due to stellar winds, and AGN driven feedback, to the degree that they affect the global galactic properties involved in the BTF, are independent of halo mass for galaxies with $10 < v_c < 250$ km/s and typically introduce no more than a factor of two range in the resulting $M_{baryon}/M_{total}$. Recent simulations by Aumer et al. of a small sample of disk galaxies are in excellent agreement with our data, suggesting that current simulations are capable of reproducing the global properties of individual disk galaxies.
  • The morphology of galaxies can be quantified to some degree using a set of scale-invariant parameters. Concentration (C), Asymmetry (A), Smoothness (S), the Gini index (G), relative contribution of the brightest pixels to the second order moment of the flux (M20), ellipticity (E), and the Gini index of the second order moment (GM) have all been applied to morphologically classify galaxies at various wavelengths. Here we present a catalog of these parameters for the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G), a volume-limited near-infrared imaging survey of nearby galaxies using the 3.6 and 4.5 micron channels of the IRAC camera. Our goal is to provide a reference catalog of near-infrared quantified morphology for high-redshift studies and galaxy evolution models with enough detail to resolve stellar mass morphology. We explore where normal, non-interacting galaxies -those typically found on the Hubble tuning fork- lie in this parameter space and show that there is a tight relation between Concentration and M20 for normal galaxies. M20 can be used to classify galaxies into earlier and later types (e.g., to separate spirals from irregulars). Several criteria using these parameters exist to select systems with a disturbed morphology, i.e., those that appear to be undergoing a tidal interaction. We examine the applicability of these criteria to Spitzer near-infrared imaging. We find that four relations, based on the parameters A&S, G&M20, GM, and C&M20, respectively, select outliers in the morphological parameter space, but each selects different subsets of galaxies. Two criteria (GM > 0.6, G > -0.115 x M20 + 0.384) seem most appropriate to identify possible mergers and the merger fraction in near-infrared surveys. We find no strong relation between lopsidedness and most of these morphological parameters, except for a weak dependence of lopsidedness on Concentration and M20.
  • We present new images (groundbased optical and mid-infrared (MIR) from the Spitzer Space Telescope) and spectra (from Spitzer) of the archetypal starburst galaxy M 82. The Spitzer data show that the MIR emission extends at least 6 kpc along the minor axis of the galaxy. We use the optical and infrared data to demonstrate that the extended emission is dominated by emission from dust. The colors of the MIR emission and the spectra indicate that there is a strong component of aromatic feature emission (the MIR features commonly attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). The dust continuum and aromatic feature emission are both strong in the well-known superwind region of this galaxy; clearly the carrier of the aromatic features can survive in close proximity to the wind, far from the plane of the galaxy. We also see significant emission by dust well outside the superwind region, providing the clearest picture to date of the dust distribution in the halo of this galaxy.
  • We present Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) observations of M81 at 24, 70, and 160 micron. The grand design nature of M81 is clearly seen, showing two well resolved spiral arms containing numerous bright star forming regions. The MIPS images reveal a significant amount of cold dust associated with the spiral arms. We investigate the variation of the ultraviolet (UV), H-alpha, and infrared (IR) luminosities and star formation rate (SFR) indicators across the face of M81 using the MIPS images and archival UV and H-alpha images. For regions in M81, we find that UV and H-alpha SFRs (uncorrected for dust attenuation) are always lower than the IR SFR. The cause of this behavior is dust attenuation and/or using SFR calibrations appropriate for entire galaxies, not regions in galaxies. The characteristics of the dust attenuation for the regions indicate the dust grains and/or geometry are different from those in starburst galaxies. The behavior of the infrared-radio correlation in M81 is seen to vary from the global average, with variations correlated with the morphology of M81.
  • The SIRTF Nearby Galaxy Survey is a comprehensive infrared imaging and spectroscopic survey of 75 nearby galaxies. Its primary goal is to characterize the infrared emission of galaxies and their principal infrared-emitting components, across a broad range of galaxy properties and star formation environments. SINGS will provide new insights into the physical processes connecting star formation to the interstellar medium properties of galaxies, and provide a vital foundation for understanding infrared observations of the distant universe and ultraluminous and active galaxies. The galaxy sample and observing strategy have been designed to maximize the scientific and archival value of the data set for the SIRTF user community at large. The SIRTF images and spectra will be supplemented by a comprehensive multi-wavelength library of ancillary and complementary observations, including radio continuum, HI, CO, submillimeter, BVRIJHK, H-alpha, Paschen-alpha, ultraviolet, and X-ray data. This paper describes the main astrophysical issues to be addressed by SINGS, the galaxy sample and the observing strategy, and the SIRTF and other ancillary data products.