• We study the BCS superfluid transition in a single-component fermionic gas of dipolar particles loaded in a tight bilayer trap, with the electric dipole moments polarized perpendicular to the layers. Based on the detailed analysis of the interlayer scattering, we calculate the critical temperature of the interlayer superfluid pairing transition when the layer separation is both smaller (dilute regime) and of the order or larger (dense regime) than the mean interparticle separation in each layer. Our calculations go beyond the standard BCS approach and include the many-body contributions resulting in the mass renormalization, as well as additional contributions to the pairing interaction. We find that the many-body effects have a pronounced effect on the critical temperature, and can either decrease (in the very dilute limit) or increase (in the dense and moderately dilute limits) the transition temperature as compared to the BCS approach.
  • We consider a superfluid state in a two-component gas of fermionic atoms with equal densities and unequal masses in the BCS limit. We develop a perturbation theory along the lines proposed by Gorkov and Melik-Barkhudarov and find that for a large difference in the masses of heavy ($M$) and light ($m$) atoms one has to take into account both the second-order and third-order contributions. The result for the critical temperature and order parameter is then quite different from the prediction of the simple BCS approach. Moreover, the small parameter of the theory turns out to be $(p_{F}|a|)/\hbar)\sqrt{M/m}\ll1$, where $p_{F}$ is the Fermi momentum, and $a$ the scattering length. Thus, for a large mass ratio $M/m$ the conventional perturbation theory requires significantly smaller Fermi momenta (densities) or scattering lengths than in the case of $M\sim m$, where the small parameter is $(p_{F}|a|)/\hbar)\ll1$. We show that 3-body scattering resonances appearing at a large mass ratio due to the presence of 3-body bound Efimov states do not influence the result, which in this sense becomes universal.
  • We study the competition between the Wigner crystal and the Laughlin liquid states in an ultracold quasi two-dimensional rapidly rotating polarized fermionic dipolar gas, and find that the Wigner crystal has a lower energy below a critical filling factor. We examine the quantum crystal to liquid transition for different confinements in the third direction. Our analysis of the phonon spectra of the Wigner crystal with the account of phonon-phonon interactions also shows the stability of the Wigner crystal for sufficiently low filling factors (\nu <1/7).
  • We develop a field theory approach to light propagation in a gas of resonant atoms taking into account vector character of light and atom-atom interactions. Within this approach, we calculate the propagator of the electric field for both short and long-range density-density correlation functions of the gas.
  • We present a detailed study of the BCS pairing transition in a trapped polarized dipolar Fermi gas. In the case of a shallow nearly spherical trap, we find the decrease of the transition temperature as a function of the trap aspect ratio and predict the existence of the optimal trap geometry. The latter corresponds to the highest critical temperature of the BCS transition for a given number of particles. We also derive the phase diagram for an ultracold trapped dipolar Fermi gases in the situation, where the trap frequencies can be of the order of the critical temperature of the BCS transition in the homogeneous case, and find the critical value of the dipole-dipole interaction energy, below which the BCS transition ceases to exist. The critical dipole strength is obtained as a function of the trap aspect ratio. Alternatively, for a given dipole strength there is a critical value of the trap anisotropy for the BCS state to appear. The order parameter calculated at criticality, exhibits nover non-monotonic behavior resulted from the combined effect of the confining potential and anisotropic character of the interparticle dipole-dipole interation.
  • We demonstrate the experimental feasibility of incompressible fractional quantum Hall-like states in ultra-cold two dimensional rapidly rotating dipolar Fermi gases. In particular, we argue that the state of the system at filling fraction $\nu =1/3$ is well-described by the Laughlin wave function and find a substantial energy gap in the quasiparticle excitation spectrum. Dipolar gases, therefore, appear as natural candidates of systems that allow to realize these very interesting highly correlated states in future experiments.
  • We demonstrate the possibility of creating and controlling an ideal and \textit{trimerized} optical Kagom\'e lattice, and study the low temperature physics of various atomic gases in such lattices. In the trimerized Kagom\'e lattice, a Bose gas exhibits a Mott transition with fractional filling factors, whereas a spinless interacting Fermi gas at 2/3 filling behaves as a quantum magnet on a triangular lattice. Finally, a Fermi-Fermi mixture at half filling for both components represents a frustrated quantum antiferromagnet with a resonating-valence-bond ground state and quantum spin liquid behavior dominated by continuous spectrum of singlet and triplet excitations. We discuss the method of preparing and observing such quantum spin liquid employing molecular Bose condensates.
  • We derive the phase diagram for ultracold trapped dipolar Fermi gases. Below the critical value of the dipole-dipole interaction energy, the BCS transition into a superfluid phase ceases to exist. The critical dipole strength is obtained as a function of the trap aspect ratio. The order parameter exhibits a novel behavior at the criticality.
  • We show that atomic Fermi gases in quasi2D geometries are promising for achieving superfluidity. In the regime of BCS pairing for weak attraction, we calculate the critical temperature T_c and analyze possibilities of increasing the ratio of T_c to the Fermi energy. In the opposite limit, where a strong coupling leads to the formation of weakly bound quasi2D dimers, we find that their Bose-Einstein condensate will be stable on a long time scale.
  • The $\theta$ dependence of the Grassmannian $U(m+n)/U(m)\times U(n)$ non-linear $\sigma$ model is reexamined. This general theory provides an important laboratory for studying the quantum Hall effect, in the special limit $m=n=0$ (replica limit). We discover however that the quantum Hall effect is in fact independent of this limit and exists as a generic topological feature of the theory for all non-negative values of $m$ and $n$. The results are in concflict with many of the historical ideas and expectations on the basis of the large $N$ expansion of the $CP^{N-1}$ or $SU(N)/U(N-1)$ model
  • Within the Grassmannian $U(2N) / U(N) \times U(N)$ non-linear $\sigma $ model representation of localization one can study the low energy dynamics of both the free and interacting electron gas. We study the cross-over between these two fundamentally different physical problems. We show how the topological arguments for the exact quantization of the Hall conductance are extended to include the Coulomb interaction problem. We discuss dynamical scaling and make contact with the theory of variable range hopping.
  • We analyze, the generation of soliton-like solutions in a single-component Fermi gas of neutral atoms at zero and finite temperatures with the phase imprinting method. By using both the numerical and analytical calculations, we find the conditions when the quasisolitons, which apparently resamble the properties of solitons in non-linear integrable equations, do exist in a non-interacting Fermi gas. We present the results for both spatially homogeneous and trapped cases, and emphasize the importance of the Fermi statistics and the absence of the interaction for the existence of such solutions.
  • We calculate the critical temperature of a superfluid phase transition in a polarized Fermi gas of dipolar particles. In this case the order parameter is anisotropic and has a nontrivial energy dependence. Cooper pairs do not have a definite value of the angular momentum and are coherent superpositions of all odd angular momenta. Our results describe prospects for achieving the superfluid transition in single-component gases of fermionic polar molecules.
  • We report the consequences of a new interaction symmetry that protects the renormalization of the electron gas in low dimensions in general, and in the quantum Hall regime in particular. We introduce a generalized Thouless' criterion for localization to include the effects of the Coulomb interaction and establish the quantization of the Hall conductance as well as the theory of massless edge bosons.
  • We revisit the $\theta$ dependence in $CP^{N-1}$ model with large $N$. We study the consequences of a recently discovered new ingredient of the instanton vacuum, i.e. the massless chiral edge excitations. Contrary to the previous believes, our results demonstrate that the large $N$ expansion displays all the fundamental features of the quantum Hall effect. This includes the {\em robust} quantization of the Hall conductance, as well as the appearance of massless bulk excitations at $\theta = \pi$. We conclude that the quantum Hall effect is a generic feature of the instanton vacuum, i.e. for any number of field components and not just for the theory in the replica limit alone.
  • We summarize the main ingredients of a unifying theory for abelian quantum Hall states. This theory combines the Finkelstein approach to localization and interaction effects with the topological concept of an instanton vacuum as well as Chern-Simons gauge theory. We elaborate on the meaning of a new symmetry ($\cal F$ invariance) for systems with an infinitely ranged interaction potential. We address the renormalization of the theory and present the main results in terms of a scaling diagram of the conductances.
  • The concepts of an instanton vacuum and F-invariance are used to derive a complete effective theory of massless edge excitations in the quantum Hall effect. We establish, for the first time, the fundamental relation between the instanton vacuum approach and the theory of chiral edge bosons. Two longstanding problems of smooth disorder and Coulomb interactions are addressed. We introduce a two dimensional network of chiral edge states and tunneling centers (saddlepoints) as a model for the plateau transitions. We derive a mean field theory including the Coulomb interactions and explain the recent empirical fits to transport at low temperatures. Secondly, we address the problem of electron tunneling into the quantum Hall edge. We express the problem in terms of an effective Luttinger liquid with conductance parameter (g) equal to the filling fraction (\nu) of the Landau band. Hence, even in the integral regime our results for tunneling are completely non-Fermi liquid like, in sharp contrast to the predictions of single edge theories.
  • We propose a unifying theory for both the integral and fractional quantum Hall regimes. This theory reconciles the Finkelstein approach to localization and interaction effects with the topological issues of an instanton vacuum and Chern-Simons gauge theory. We elaborate on the microscopic origins of the effective action and unravel a new symmetry in the problem with Coulomb interactions which we name F-invariance. This symmetry has a broad range of physical consequences which will be the main topic of future analyses. In the second half of this paper we compute the response of the theory to electromagnetic perturbations at a tree level approximation. This is applicable to the theory of ordinary metals as well as the composite fermion approach to the half-integer effect. Fluctuations in the Chern-Simons gauge fields are found to be well behaved only when the theory is F-invariant.
  • The concept of F-invariance, which previously arose in our analysis of the integral and half-integral quantum Hall effects, is studied in 2+2\epsilon spatial dimensions. We report the results of a detailed renormalization group analysis and establish the renormalizability of the (Finkelstein) action to two loop order. We show that the infrared behavior of the theory can be extracted from gauge invariant (F-invariant) quantities only. For these quantities (conductivity, specific heat) we derive explicit scaling functions. We identify a bosonic quasiparticle density of states which develops a Coulomb gap as one approaches the metal-insulator transition from the metallic side. We discuss the consequences of F-invariance for the strong coupling, insulating regime.
  • We reveal a strong influence of a superfluid phase transition on the character of single-particle excitations of a trapped neutral-atom Fermi gas. Below the transition temperature the presence of a spatially inhomogeneous order parameter (gap) shifts up the excitation eigenenergies and leads to the appearance of in-gap excitations localized in the outer part of the gas sample. The eigenenergies become sensitive to the gas temperature and are no longer multiples of the trap frequencies. These features should manifest themselves in a strong change of the density oscillations induced by modulations of the trap frequencies and can be used for identifying the superfluid phase transition.
  • We discuss a superfluid phase transition in a trapped neutral-atom Fermi gas. We consider the case where the critical temperature greatly exceeds the spacing between the trap levels and derive the corresponding Ginzburg-Landau equation. The latter turns out to be analogous to the equation for the condensate wave function in a trapped Bose gas. The analysis of its solution provides us with the value of the critical temperature $T_{c}$ and with the spatial and temperature dependence of the order parameter in the vicinity of the phase transition point.