• We have identified a large-scale structure at z~0.73 in the COSMOS field, coherently described by the distribution of galaxy photometric redshifts, an ACS weak-lensing convergence map and the distribution of extended X-ray sources in a mosaic of XMM observations. The main peak seen in these maps corresponds to a rich cluster with Tx= 3.51+0.60/-0.46 keV and Lx=(1.56+/-0.04) x 10^{44} erg/s ([0.1-2.4] keV band). We estimate an X-ray mass within $r500$ corresponding to M500~1.6 x 10^{14} Msun and a total lensing mass (extrapolated by fitting a NFW profile) M(NFW)=(6+/-3) x 10^15 Msun. We use an automated morphological classification of all galaxies brighter than I_AB=24 over the structure area to measure the fraction of early-type objects as a function of local projected density Sigma_10, based on photometric redshifts derived from ground-based deep multi-band photometry. We recover a robust morphology-density relation at this redshift, indicating, for comparable local densities, a smaller fraction of early-type galaxies than today. Interestingly, this difference is less strong at the highest densities and becomes more severe in intermediate environments. We also find, however, local "inversions'' of the observed global relation, possibly driven by the large-scale environment. In particular, we find direct correspondence of a large concentration of disk galaxies to (the colder side of) a possible shock region detected in the X-ray temperature map and surface brightness distribution of the dominant cluster. We interpret this as potential evidence of shock-induced star formation in existing galaxy disks, during the ongoing merger between two sub-clusters.
  • We present a detailed spectroscopic investigation, spanning four winters, of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star IRAS 02091+6333. Zijlstra & Weinberger (2002) found a giant wall of dust around this star and modelled this unique phenomenon. However their work suffered from the quality of the optical investigations of the central object. Our spectroscopic investigation allowed us to define the spectral type and the interstellar foreground extinction more precisely. Accurate multi band photometry was carried out. This provides us with the possibility to derive the physical parameters of the system. The measurements presented here suggest a weak irregular photometric variability of the target, while there is no evidence of a spectroscopic variability over the last four years.