• During its first observing run, in late 2015, the advanced LIGO facility announced 3 gravitational wave (GW) triggers to electromagnetic follow-up partners. Two of these have since been confirmed as being of astrophysical origin: both are binary black hole mergers at ~500 Mpc; the other trigger was later found not to be astrophysical. In this paper we report on the Swift follow up observations of the second and third triggers, including details of 21 X-ray sources detected; none of which can be associated with the GW event. We also consider the challenges that the next GW observing run will bring as the sensitivity and hence typical distance of GW events will increase. We discuss how to effectively use galaxy catalogues to prioritise areas for follow up, especially in the presence of distance estimates from the GW data. We also consider two galaxy catalogues and suggest that the high completeness at larger distances of the 2MASS Photometric Redshift Catalogue (2MPZ) makes it very well suited to optimise Swift follow-up observations.
  • With the first direct detection of merging black holes in 2015, the era of gravitational wave (GW) astrophysics began. A complete picture of compact object mergers, however, requires the detection of an electromagnetic (EM) counterpart. We report ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray observations by Swift and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) of the EM counterpart of the binary neutron star merger GW170817. The bright, rapidly fading ultraviolet emission indicates a high mass ($\approx0.03$ solar masses) wind-driven outflow with moderate electron fraction ($Y_{e}\approx0.27$). Combined with the X-ray limits, we favor an observer viewing angle of $\approx 30^{\circ}$ away from the orbital rotation axis, which avoids both obscuration from the heaviest elements in the orbital plane and a direct view of any ultra-relativistic, highly collimated ejecta (a gamma-ray burst afterglow).
  • We report on the detection of a bright, short, structured X-ray burst coming from the supernova remnant RCW 103 on 2016 June 22 caught by the Swift/BAT monitor, and on the follow-up campaign made with Swift/XRT, Swift/UVOT and the optical/NIR GROND detector. The characteristics of this flash, such as duration, and spectral shape, are consistent with typical short bursts observed from soft gamma repeaters. The BAT error circle at 68 per cent confidence range encloses the point-like X-ray source at the centre of the nebula, 1E161348-5055. Its nature has been long debated due to a periodicity of 6.67 hr in X-rays, which could indicate either an extremely slow pulsating neutron star, or the orbital period of a very compact X-ray binary system. We found that 20 min before the BAT trigger, the soft X-ray emission of 1E161348-5055 was a factor of ~100 higher than measured 2 yr earlier, indicating that an outburst had already started. By comparing the spectral and timing characteristics of the source in the two years before the outburst and after the BAT event, we find that, besides a change in luminosity and spectral shape, also the 6.67 hr pulsed profile has significantly changed with a clear phase shift with respect to its low-flux profile. The UV/optical/NIR observations did not reveal any counterpart at the position of 1E161348-5055. Based on these findings, we associate the BAT burst with 1E161348-5055, we classify it as a magnetar, and pinpoint the 6.67 hr periodicity as the magnetar spin period.
  • The Advanced LIGO observatory recently reported the first direct detection of gravitational waves (GW) which triggered ALIGO on 2015 September 14. We report on observations taken with the Swift satellite two days after the trigger. No new X-ray, optical, UV or hard X-ray sources were detected in our observations, which were focussed on nearby galaxies in the GW error region and covered 4.7 square degrees (~2% of the probability in the rapidly-available GW error region; 0.3% of the probability from the final GW error region, which was produced several months after the trigger). We describe the rapid Swift response and automated analysis of the X-ray telescope and UV/Optical Telescope data, and note the importance to electromagnetic follow up of early notification of the progenitor details inferred from GW analysis.
  • GRB 110918A is the brightest long GRB detected by Konus-WIND during its 19 years of continuous observations and the most luminous GRB ever observed since the beginning of the cosmological era in 1997. We report on the final IPN localization of this event and its detailed multiwavelength study with a number of space-based instruments. The prompt emission is characterized by a typical duration, a moderare $E_{peak}$ of the time-integrated spectrum, and strong hard-to-soft evolution. The high observed energy fluence yields, at z=0.984, a huge isotropic-equivalent energy release $E_{iso}=(2.1\pm0.1)\times10^{54}$ erg. The record-breaking energy flux observed at the peak of the short, bright, hard initial pulse results in an unprecedented isotropic-equivalent luminosity $L_{iso}=(4.7\pm0.2)\times10^{54}$erg s$^{-1}$. A tail of the soft gamma-ray emission was detected with temporal and spectral behavior typical of that predicted by the synchrotron forward-shock model. Swift/XRT and Swift/UVOT observed the bright afterglow from 1.2 to 48 days after the burst and revealed no evidence of a jet break. The post-break scenario for the afterglow is preferred from our analysis, with a hard underlying electron spectrum and ISM-like circumburst environment implied. We conclude that, among multiple reasons investigated, the tight collimation of the jet must have been a key ingredient to produce this unusually bright burst. The inferred jet opening angle of 1.7-3.4 deg results in reasonable values of the collimation-corrected radiated energy and the peak luminosity, which, however, are still at the top of their distributions for such tightly collimated events. We estimate a detection horizon for a similar ultraluminous GRB of $z\sim7.5$ for Konus-WIND, and $z\sim12$ for Swift/BAT, which stresses the importance of GRBs as probes of the early Universe.
  • The dynamic range of photon counting micro-channel-plate (MCP) intensified charged-coupled device (CCD) instruments such as the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) is limited at the bright end by coincidence loss, the superposition of multiple photons in the individual frames recorded by the CCD. Photons which arrive during the brief period in which the image frame is transferred for read out of the CCD are displaced in the transfer direction in the recorded images. For sufficiently bright sources, these displaced counts form read-out streaks. Using UVOT observations of Tycho-2 stars, we investigate the use of these read-out streaks to obtain photometry for sources which are too bright (and hence have too much coincidence loss) for normal aperture photometry to be reliable. For read-out-streak photometry, the bright-source limiting factor is coincidence loss within the MCPs rather than the CCD. We find that photometric measurements can be obtained for stars up to 2.4 magnitudes brighter than the usual full-frame coincidence-loss limit by using the read-out streaks. The resulting bright-limit Vega magnitudes in the UVOT passbands are UVW2=8.80, UVM2=8.27, UVW1=8.86, u=9.76, b=10.53, v=9.31 and White=11.71; these limits are independent of the windowing mode of the camera. We find that a photometric precision of 0.1 mag can be achieved through read-out streak measurements. A suitable method for the measurement of read-out streaks is described and all necessary calibration factors are given.
  • As part of the Selected Areas Starcount Survey (SASS), a CCD survey to V>21, we have obtained VI photometry of two fields at b=+-40 aligned roughly with an extrapolation of the major axis of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Comparison of the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) for some of these fields to the CMDs of fields reflected about the Galactic l=0 meridian reveals an excess of stars at V_o=17.85 and 0.9 < (V-I)_o < 1.1 in the (l,b) = (11,-40) field. The excess stars have colors consistent with the Sgr red clump, and deeper CMD imaging in these locations shows evidence of a main-sequence turnoff at V=21 with the main-sequence extending to the limit of our data (V=24). The surface brightnesses we derive from either the potential excess of red clump stars or the apparent excess of MSTO stars are consistent with each other and with the results of other surveys at this latitude. No similar excess appears in our northern Galactic hemisphere fields near l=353, b=+41 field. We have obtained spectroscopy of all 30 candidate red clump stars in the range 0.9 < (V-I)_o < 1.1 and 17.75 < V_o < 17.95. The radial velocity distribution of the stars, while dissimilar from expectations of Galactic structure models, does not show a contribution by stars near the Galactocentric radial velocity seen in other studies near the Sgr core. It is difficult to reconcile a photometric result that is consistent with other explorations of the Sagittarius stream with a radial velocity distribution that is apparently inconsistent. In a companion paper (Johnston et al. 1999), we discuss how some of the discrepancies are resolved if ur potential Sgr detection corresponds to a different Sgr tidal streamer than that detected by most other surveys.