• The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • In this work we investigate in detail the effects local environment (groups and pairs) has on galaxies with stellar mass similar to the Milky-Way (L* galaxies). A volume limited sample of 6,150 galaxies is classified to determine emission features, morphological type and presence of a disk. This sample allows for characteristics of galaxies to be isolated (e.g. stellar mass and group halo mass), and their codependencies determined. We observe that galaxy-galaxy interactions play the most important role in shaping the evolution within a group halo, the main role of halo mass is in gathering the galaxies together to encourage such interactions. Dominant pair galaxies find their overall star formation enhanced when the pair's mass ratio is close to 1, otherwise we observe the same galaxies as we would in an unpaired system. The minor galaxy in a pair is greatly affected by its companion galaxy, and whilst the star forming fraction is always suppressed relative to equivalent stellar mass unpaired galaxies, it becomes lower still when the mass ratio of a pair system increases. We find that, in general, the close galaxy-galaxy interaction rate drops as a function of halo mass for a given amount of stellar mass. We find evidence of a local peak of interactions for Milky-Way stellar mass galaxies in Milky-Way halo mass groups. Low mass halos, and in particular Local Group mass halos, are an important environment for understanding the typical evolutionary path of a unit of stellar mass. We find compelling evidence for galaxy conformity in both groups and pairs, where morphological type conformity is dominant in groups, and emission class conformity is dominant in pairs. This suggests that group scale conformity is the result of many galaxy encounters over an extended period of time, whilst pair conformity is a fairly instantaneous response to a transitory interaction.
  • Many results in modern astrophysics rest on the notion that the Initial Mass Function (IMF) is universal. Our observations of HI selected galaxies in the light of H-alpha and the far-ultraviolet (FUV) challenge this notion. The flux ratio H-alpha/FUV from these two star formation tracers shows strong correlations with the surface-brightness in H-alpha and the R band: Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies have lower ratios compared to High Surface Brightness galaxies and to expectations from equilibrium star formation models using commonly favored IMF parameters. Weaker but significant correlations of H-alpha/FUV with luminosity, rotational velocity and dynamical mass are found as well as a systematic trend with morphology. The correlated variations of H-alpha/FUV with other global parameters are thus part of the larger family of galaxy scaling relations. The H-alpha/FUV correlations can not be due to dust correction errors, while systematic variations in the star formation history can not explain the trends with both H-alpha and R surface brightness. LSB galaxies are unlikely to have a higher escape fraction of ionizing photons considering their high gas fraction, and color-magnitude diagrams. The most plausible explanation for the correlations are systematic variations of the upper mass limit and/or slope of the IMF at the upper end. We outline a scenario of pressure driving the correlations by setting the efficiency of the formation of the dense star clusters where the highest mass stars form. Our results imply that the star formation rate measured in a galaxy is highly sensitive to the tracer used in the measurement. A non-universal IMF also calls into question the interpretation of metal abundance patterns in dwarf galaxies and star formation histories derived from color magnitude diagrams. Abridged.
  • We have extended the search for luminous (M_{b_J} <= -10.5) compact stellar systems (CSSs) in the Virgo and Fornax galaxy clusters by targeting with the recently commissioned AAOmega spectrograph three cluster environments -- the cluster cores around M87 and NGC 1399, intracluster space, and a major galaxy merger site (NGC 1316). We have significantly increased the number of redshift-confirmed CSSs in the Virgo cluster core and located three Virgo intracluster globular clusters (IGCs) at a large distance from M87 (154-173 arcmin or ~750-850 kpc) -- the first isolated IGCs to be redshift-confirmed. We estimate luminous CSS populations in each cluster environment, and compare their kinematic and photometric properties. We find that (1) the estimated luminous CSS population in the Virgo cluster core is half of that in Fornax, possibly reflecting the more relaxed dynamical status of the latter; (2) in both clusters the luminous CSS velocity dispersions are less than those of the cD galaxy GC system or cluster dE galaxies, suggesting luminous CSSs have less energetic orbits; (3) Fornax has a sub-population of cluster core luminous CSSs that are redder and presumably more metal-rich than those found in Virgo; (4) no luminous CSSs were found in a 10-20 arcmin (60-130 kpc) radial arc east of the 3 Gyr old NGC 1316 galaxy merger remnant or in the adjacent intracluster region, implying that any luminous CSSs created in the galaxy merger have not been widely dispersed.
  • We present a detailed analysis of two-band HST/ACS imaging of 21 ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies in the Virgo and Fornax Clusters. The aim of this work is to test two formation hypotheses for UCDs--whether they are bright globular clusters (GCs) or "threshed'' early-type dwarf galaxies--by comparison of UCD structural parameters and colors with GCs and galaxy nuclei. We find that the UCD surface brightness profiles can be described by a range of models and that the luminous UCDs can not be described by standard King models with tidal cutoffs as they have extended outer halos. This is not expected from traditional King models of GCs, but is consistent with recent results for massive GCs. The total luminosities, colors and sizes of the UCDs are consistent with them being either luminous GCs or threshed nuclei of both early-type and late-type galaxies (not just early-type dwarfs). For the most luminous UCDs we estimate color gradients over a limited range of radius. These are systematically positive in the sense of getting redder outwards: mean Delta(F606W-F814W)=0.14 mag per 100 pc with rms=0.06 mag per 100 pc. The positive gradients found in the bright UCDs are consistent with them being either bright GCs or threshed early-type dwarf galaxies (except VUCD3). In contrast to the above results we find a very significant difference in the sizes of UCDs and early-type galaxy nuclei: the effective radii of UCDs are 2.2 times larger than those of early-type galaxy nuclei at the same luminosity. This result suggests an important test can be made of the threshing hypothesis by simulating the process and predicting what size increase is expected.
  • We have obtained spectroscopic redshifts of colour-selected point sources in four wide area VLT-FLAMES fields around the Fornax Cluster giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1399, identifying as cluster members 30 previously unknown faint (-10.5<M_g'<-8.8) compact stellar systems (CSS), and improving redshift accuracy for 23 previously catalogued CSS. By amalgamating our results with CSS from previous 2dF observations and excluding CSS dynamically associated with prominent (non-dwarf) galaxies surrounding NGC 1399, we have isolated 80 `unbound' systems that are either part of NGC 1399's globular cluster (GC) system or intracluster GCs. For these unbound systems, we find (i) they are mostly located off the main stellar locus in colour-colour space; (ii) their projected distribution about NGC 1399 is anisotropic, following the Fornax Cluster galaxy distribution, and there is weak evidence for group rotation about NGC 1399; (iii) their completeness-adjusted radial surface density profile has a slope similar to that of NGC 1399's inner GC system; (iv) their mean heliocentric recessional velocity is between that of NGC 1399's inner GCs and that of the surrounding dwarf galaxies, but their velocity dispersion is significantly lower; (v) bright CSS (M_V<-11) are slightly redder than the fainter systems, suggesting they have higher metallicity; (vi) CSS show no significant trend in $g' - i'$ colour index with radial distance from NGC 1399.
  • We present the results of a search for ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) in six different galaxy groups: Dorado, NGC1400, NGC0681, NGC4038, NGC4697 and NGC5084. We searched in the apparent magnitude range 17.5 < b_j < 20.5 (except NGC5084: 19.2 < b_j < 21.0). We found 1 definite plus 2 possible UCD candidates in the Dorado group and 2 possible UCD candidates in the NGC1400 group. No UCDs were found in the other groups. We compared these results with predicted luminosities of UCDs in the groups according to the hypothesis that UCDs are globular clusters formed in galaxies. The theoretical predictions broadly agree with the observational results, but deeper surveys are needed to fully test the predictions.
  • We introduce the Survey for Ionization in Neutral Gas Galaxies (SINGG), a census of star formation in HI-selected galaxies. The survey consists of H-alpha and R-band imaging of a sample of 468 galaxies selected from the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS). The sample spans three decades in HI mass and is free of many of the biases that affect other star forming galaxy samples. We present the criteria for sample selection, list the entire sample, discuss our observational techniques, and describe the data reduction and calibration methods. This paper focuses on 93 SINGG targets whose observations have been fully reduced and analyzed to date. The majority of these show a single Emission Line Galaxy (ELG). We see multiple ELGs in 13 fields, with up to four ELGs in a single field. All of the targets in this sample are detected in H-alpha indicating that dormant (non-star forming) galaxies with M(HI) > ~3e7 M_sun are very rare. A database of the measured global properties of the ELGs is presented. The ELG sample spans four orders of magnitude in luminosity (H-alpha and R-band), and H-alpha surface brightness, nearly three orders of magnitude in R surface brightness and nearly two orders of magnitude in H-alpha equivalent width (EW). The surface brightness distribution of our sample is broader than that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic sample, the (EW) distribution is broader than prism-selected samples, and the morphologies found include all common types of star forming galaxies (e.g. irregular, spiral, blue compact dwarf, starbursts, merging and colliding systems, and even residual star formation in S0 and Sa spirals). (abridged)
  • We derive observed Halpha and R band luminosity densities of an HI-selected sample of nearby galaxies using the SINGG sample to be l_Halpha' = (9.4 +/- 1.8)e38 h_70 erg s^-1 Mpc^-3 for Halpha and l_R' = (4.4 +/- 0.7)e37 h_70 erg s^-1 A^-1 Mpc^-3 in the R band. This R band luminosity density is approximately 70% of that found by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This leads to a local star formation rate density of log(SFRD) = -1.80 +0.13/-0.07(random) +/- 0.03(systematic) + log(h_70) after applying a mean internal extinction correction of 0.82 magnitudes. The gas cycling time of this sample is found to be t_gas = 7.5 +1.3/-2.1 Gyr, and the volume-averaged equivalent width of the SINGG galaxies is EW(Halpha) = 28.8 +7.2/-4.7 A (21.2 +4.2/-3.5 A without internal dust correction). As with similar surveys, these results imply that SFRD(z) decreases drastically from z ~ 1.5 to the present. A comparison of the dynamical masses of the SINGG galaxies evaluated at their optical limits with their stellar and HI masses shows significant evidence of downsizing: the most massive galaxies have a larger fraction of their mass locked up in stars compared with HI, while the opposite is true for less massive galaxies. We show that the application of the Kennicutt star formation law to a galaxy having the median orbital time at the optical limit of this sample results in a star formation rate decay with cosmic time similar to that given by the SFRD(z) evolution. This implies that the SFRD(z) evolution is primarily due to the secular evolution of galaxies, rather than interactions or mergers. This is consistent with the morphologies predominantly seen in the SINGG sample.
  • We present the internal velocity dispersions and spectral line indices for six Virgo ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies obtained from spectroscopy with the Keck II 10-m telescope. We use these results: 1) to compare the Virgo UCDs with the Fornax UCD population; 2) to compare UCDs with globular clusters (GCs) to determine if UCDs and the most luminous GCs are the same or distinct systems; 3) to further test the nucleated dwarf elliptical (dE,N) stripping hypothesis for UCD formation.
  • We have used the 2dF instrument on the AAT to obtain redshifts of a sample of z<3, 18.0<g<21.85 quasars selected from SDSS imaging. These data are part of a larger joint programme: the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey (2SLAQ). We describe the quasar selection algorithm and present the resulting luminosity function of 5645 quasars in 105.7 deg^2. The bright end number counts and luminosity function agree well with determinations from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) data to g\sim20.2. However, at the faint end the 2SLAQ number counts and luminosity function are steeper than the final 2QZ results from Croom et al. (2004), but are consistent with the preliminary 2QZ results from Boyle et al. (2000). Using the functional form adopted for the 2QZ analysis, we find a faint end slope of beta=-1.78+/-0.03 if we allow all of the parameters to vary and beta=-1.45+/-0.03 if we allow only the faint end slope and normalization to vary. Our maximum likelihood fit to the data yields 32% more quasars than the final 2QZ parameterization, but is not inconsistent with other g>21 deep surveys. The 2SLAQ data exhibit no well defined ``break'' but do clearly flatten with increasing magnitude. The shape of the quasar luminosity function derived from 2SLAQ is in good agreement with that derived from type I quasars found in hard X-ray surveys. [Abridged]
  • Direct evidence of stellar material from galaxy disruption in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) relies on challenging observations of individual stars, planetary nebulae and diffuse optical light. Here we show that the ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) we have discovered in the Fornax Cluster are a new and easy-to-measure probe of disruption in the ICM. We present spectroscopic observations supporting the hypothesis that the UCDs are the remnant nuclei of tidally ``threshed'' dwarf galaxies. Deep optical imaging of the cluster has revealed a 43-kpc long arc of tidal debris, flanking a nucleated dwarf elliptical (dE,N) cluster member. We may be witnessing galaxy threshing in action.
  • We are using the Multibeam 21cm receiver on the Parkes Telescope combined with the optical Two degree Field spectrograph (2dF) of the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain the first complete spectroscopic sample of the Fornax cluster. In the optical the survey is unique in that all objects (both ``stars'' and ``galaxies'') within our magnitude limits (Bj=16.5 to 19.7) are measured, producing the most complete survey of cluster members irrespective of surface brightness. We have detected two new classes of high surface brightness dwarf galaxy in the cluster. With 2dF we have discovered a population of very low luminosity (Mb approx -12) objects which are unresolved from the ground and may be the stripped nuclei of dwarf galaxies; they are unlike any known galaxies. In a survey of the brighter (Bj=16.5 to 18) galaxies with the FLAIR-II spectrograph we have found a number of new high surface brightness dwarf galaxies and show that the fraction of star-forming dwarf galaxies in the cluster is about 30 per cent, about twice that implied by earlier morphological classifications. Our radio observations have greatly improved upon the sensitivity of the standard Multibeam survey by using a new ``basket weave'' scanning pattern. Our initial analysis shows that we are detecting new cluster members with HI masses of order 10-to-the-8 Msun and HI mass-to-light ratios of 1-2 Msun/Lsun.
  • The Fornax Spectroscopic Survey will use the Two degree Field spectrograph (2dF) of the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for a complete sample of all 14000 objects with 16.5<=Bj<=19.7 in a 12 square degree area centred on the Fornax Cluster. By selecting all objects---both stars and galaxies---independent of morphology, we cover a much larger range of surface brightness and scale size than previous surveys. In this paper we present results from the first 2dF field. Redshift distributions and velocity structures are shown for all observed objects in the direction of Fornax, including Galactic stars, galaxies in and around the Fornax Cluster, and for the background galaxy population. The velocity data for the stars show the contributions from the different Galactic components, plus a small tail to high velocities. We find no galaxies in the foreground to the cluster in our 2dF field. The Fornax Cluster is clearly defined kinematically. The mean velocity from the 26 cluster members having reliable redshifts is 1560+/-80 km/s. They show a velocity dispersion of 380+/-50 km/s. Large-scale structure can be traced behind the cluster to a redshift beyond z=0.3. Background compact galaxies and low surface brightness galaxies are found to follow the general galaxy distribution.
  • We investigate the X-ray properties of the Parkes sample of flat-spectrum radio sources using data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey and archival pointed PSPC observations. In total, 163 of the 323 sources are detected. For the remaining 160 sources 2 sigma upper limits to the X-ray flux are derived. We present power-law photon indices for 115 sources, which were either determined with a hardness ratio technique or from direct fits to pointed PSPC data. For quasars, the soft X-ray photon index is correlated with redshift and with radio spectral index. Webster et al. (1995) discovered many sources with unusually red optical continua among the quasars of this sample and interpreted this result in terms of extinction by dust. Although the X-ray spectra in general do not show excess absorption, we find that low-redshift optically red quasars have significantly lower soft X-ray luminosities on average than objects with blue optical continua. The difference disappears for higher redshifts, as is expected for intrinsic absorption by cold gas associated with the dust. Alternative explanations are briefly discussed. We conclude, however, that dust does play an important role in some of the radio-loud quasars with red optical continua.
  • We present new radial velocities for 189 galaxies in a 91 sq. deg region of the Shapley supercluster measured with the FLAIR-II spectrograph on the UK Schmidt Telescope. The data reveal two sheets of galaxies linking the major concentrations of the supercluster. The supercluster is not flattened in Declination as was suggested previously and it may be at least 30 percent larger than previously thought with a correspondingly larger contribution to the motion of the Local Group.
  • We are using the 2dF spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for a complete sample of all 14000 objects with 16.5<B<19.7 in a 12 square degree area centred on the Fornax cluster. The aims of this project include the study of dwarf galaxies in the cluster (both known low surface brightness objects and putative normal surface brightness dwarfs) and a comparison sample of background field galaxies. We will also measure quasars, any previously unrecognised compact galaxies and a large sample of Galactic stars. Here we present initial results from the first 680 objects observed, including the discovery of a number of dwarf galaxies in the cluster more compact than any previously known.
  • There is controversy about the measurement of statistical associations between bright quasars and faint, presumably foreground galaxies. We look at the distribution of galaxies around an unbiased sample of 63 bright, moderate redshift quasars using a new statistic based on the separation of the quasar and its nearest neighbour galaxy. We find a significant excess of close neighbours at separations less than about 10 arcsec which we attribute to the magnification by gravitational lensing of quasars which would otherwise be too faint to be included in our sample. About one quarter to one third of the quasars are so affected although the allowed error in this fraction is large.