• The Sun's internal structure and dynamics can be studied with helioseismology, which uses the Sun's natural acoustic oscillations to build up a profile of the solar interior. We discuss how solar acoustic oscillations are affected by the Sun's magnetic field. Careful observations of these effects can be inverted to determine the variations in the structure and dynamics of the Sun's interior as the solar cycle progresses. Observed variations in the structure and dynamics can then be used to inform models of the solar dynamo, which are crucial to our understanding of how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and maintained.
  • The continuous high-precision photometric observations provided by the CoRoT and Kepler space missions have allowed us to better understand the structure and dynamics of red giants using asteroseismic techniques. A small fraction of these stars shows dipole modes with unexpectedly low amplitudes. The reduction in amplitude is more pronounced for stars with higher frequency of maximum power. In this work we want to characterize KIC 8561221 in order to confirm that it is currently the least evolved star among this peculiar subset and to discuss several hypotheses that could help explain the reduction of the dipole mode amplitudes. We used Kepler short- and long-cadence data combined with spectroscopic observations to infer the stellar structure and dynamics of KIC 8561221. We then discussed different scenarios that could contribute to the reduction of the dipole amplitudes such as a fast rotating interior or the effect of a magnetic field on the properties of the modes. We also performed a detailed study of the inertia and damping of the modes. We have been able to characterize 37 oscillations modes, in particular, a few dipole modes above nu_max that exhibit nearly normal amplitudes. We have inferred a surface rotation period of around 91 days and uncovered the existence of a variation in the surface magnetic activity during the last 4 years. As expected, the internal regions of the star probed by the l = 2 and 3 modes spin 4 to 8 times faster than the surface. With our grid of standard models we are able to properly fit the observed frequencies. Our model calculation of mode inertia and damping give no explanation for the depressed dipole modes. A fast rotating core is also ruled out as a possible explanation. Finally, we do not have any observational evidence of the presence of a strong deep magnetic field inside the star.
  • Having started science operations in May 2009, the Kepler photometer has been able to provide exquisite data of solar-like stars. Five out of the 42 stars observed continuously during the survey phase show evidence of oscillations, even though they are rather faint (magnitudes from 10.5 to 12). In this paper, we present an overview of the results of the seismic analysis of 4 of these stars observed during more than eight months.
  • We analyze the photometric short-cadence data obtained with the Kepler Mission during the first eight months of observations of two solar-type stars of spectral types G and F: KIC 11395018 and KIC 11234888 respectively, the latter having a lower signal-to-noise ratio compared to the former. We estimate global parameters of the acoustic (p) modes such as the average large and small frequency separations, the frequency of the maximum of the p-mode envelope and the average linewidth of the acoustic modes. We were able to identify and to measure 22 p-mode frequencies for the first star and 16 for the second one even though the signal-to-noise ratios of these stars are rather low. We also derive some information about the stellar rotation periods from the analyses of the low-frequency parts of the power spectral densities. A model-independent estimation of the mean density, mass and radius are obtained using the scaling laws. We emphasize the importance of continued observations for the stars with low signal-to-noise ratio for an improved characterization of the oscillation modes. Our results offer a preview of what will be possible for many stars with the long data sets obtained during the remainder of the mission.
  • The Kepler mission is providing photometric data of exquisite quality for the asteroseismic study of different classes of pulsating stars. These analyses place particular demands on the pre-processing of the data, over a range of timescales from minutes to months. Here, we describe processing procedures developed by the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC) to prepare light curves that are optimized for the asteroseismic study of solar-like oscillating stars in which outliers, jumps and drifts are corrected.
  • The primary science goal of the Kepler Mission is to provide a census of exoplanets in the solar neighborhood, including the identification and characterization of habitable Earth-like planets. The asteroseismic capabilities of the mission are being used to determine precise radii and ages for the target stars from their solar-like oscillations. Chaplin et al. (2010) published observations of three bright G-type stars, which were monitored during the first 33.5 days of science operations. One of these stars, the subgiant KIC 11026764, exhibits a characteristic pattern of oscillation frequencies suggesting that it has evolved significantly. We have derived asteroseismic estimates of the properties of KIC 11026764 from Kepler photometry combined with ground-based spectroscopic data. We present the results of detailed modeling for this star, employing a variety of independent codes and analyses that attempt to match the asteroseismic and spectroscopic constraints simultaneously. We determine both the radius and the age of KIC 11026764 with a precision near 1%, and an accuracy near 2% for the radius and 15% for the age. Continued observations of this star promise to reveal additional oscillation frequencies that will further improve the determination of its fundamental properties.
  • Observations from the Kepler satellite were recently published for three bright G-type stars, which were monitored during the first 33.5d of science operations. One of these stars, KIC 11026764, exhibits a characteristic pattern of oscillation frequencies suggesting that the star has evolved significantly. We have derived initial estimates of the properties of KIC 11026764 from the oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler, combined with ground-based spectroscopic data. We present preliminary results from detailed modeling of this star, employing a variety of independent codes and analyses that attempt to match the asteroseismic and spectroscopic constraints simultaneously.
  • Time-distance helioseismology and related techniques show great promise for probing the structure and dynamics of the subphotospheric layers of the Sun. Indeed time-distance helioseismology has already been applied to make inferences about structures and flows under sunspots and active regions, to map long-lived convective flow patterns, and so on. Yet certainly there are still many inadequacies in the current approaches and, as the data get better and the questions we seek to address get more subtle, methods that were previously regarded as adequate are no longer acceptable. Here we give a short and partial description of outstanding problems in local helioseismology, using time-distance helioseismology as a guiding example.
  • Various methods of helioseismology are used to study the subsurface properties of the sunspot in NOAA Active Region 9787. This sunspot was chosen because it is axisymmetric, shows little evolution during 20-28 January 2002, and was observed continuously by the MDI/SOHO instrument. (...) Wave travel times and mode frequencies are affected by the sunspot. In most cases, wave packets that propagate through the sunspot have reduced travel times. At short travel distances, however, the sign of the travel-time shifts appears to depend sensitively on how the data are processed and, in particular, on filtering in frequency-wavenumber space. We carry out two linear inversions for wave speed: one using travel-times and phase-speed filters and the other one using mode frequencies from ring analysis. These two inversions give subsurface wave-speed profiles with opposite signs and different amplitudes. (...) From this study of AR9787, we conclude that we are currently unable to provide a unified description of the subsurface structure and dynamics of the sunspot.
  • Aims. In this paper we analyse numerically the propagation and dispersion of acoustic waves in the solar-like sub-photosphere with localised non-uniform magnetic field concentrations, mimicking sunspots with various representative magnetic field configurations. Methods. Numerical simulations of wave propagation through the solar sub-photosphere with a localised magnetic field concentration are carried out using SAC, which solves the MHD equations for gravitationally stratified plasma. The initial equilibrium density and pressure stratifications are derived from a standard solar model. Acoustic waves are generated by a source located at the height approximately corresponding to the visible surface of the Sun. We analyse the response of vertical velocity to changes in the interior due to magnetic field at the level corresponding to the visible solar surface, by the means of local time-distance helioseismology. Results. The results of numerical simulations of acoustic wave propagation and dispersion in the solar sub-photosphere with localised magnetic field concentrations of various types are presented. Time-distance diagrams of the vertical velocity perturbation at the level corresponding to the visible solar surface show that the magnetic field perturbs and scatters acoustic waves and absorbs the acoustic power of the wave packet. For the weakly magnetised case the effect of magnetic field is mainly thermodynamic, since the magnetic field changes the temperature stratification. However, we observe the signature of slow magnetoacoustic mode, propagating downwards, for the strong magnetic field cases.
  • We perform a two-dimensional inversion of f-mode travel times to determine near-surface solar flows. The inversion is based on optimally localized averaging of travel times. We use finite-wavelength travel-time sensitivity functions and a realistic model of the data errors. We find that it is possible to obtain a spatial resolution of 2 Mm. The error in the resulting flow estimate ultimately depends on the observation time and the number of travel distances used in the inversion.
  • The region of the second ionization of helium in the Sun is a narrow layer near the surface. Ionization induces a local change of the adiabatic exponent $\Gamma_1$, which produces a characteristic signature in the frequencies of p-modes. By adapting the method developed by (Monteiro et al. 1994), we propose a methodology for determining the properties of this region by studying such a signature in the frequencies of oscillation. Using solar data we illustrate how the signal from the helium ionization zone can be isolated. Using solar models with different physics -- theory of convection, equation of state and low temperature opacities -- we establish how the characteristics of the signal depend on the different aspects contributing to the structure in the ionization layer. We further discuss how the method can be used to measure the solar helium abundance in the envelope and to constrain the physics affecting this region of the Sun. The potential usefulness of the method we propose is shown. It may complement other inversion methods developed to study the solar structure and to determine the envelope helium abundance.
  • Despite the strong evidence that the peaks in the spectrum of solar oscillations are asymmetric, most determinations of mode frequencies have been based on fits of symmetric Lorentzian profiles to the Fourier or power spectra of oscillation time strings. The systematic errors resulting from neglecting the line asymmetry could have serious effects on inversions for the solar internal structure and rotation. Here we analyse artificial data based on simple models of the intrinsic line asymmetry, using GONG mode parameters with asymmetries found by one of us (Rosenthal \cite{rosenthal2}). By fitting Lorentzians to the resulting spectra, we estimate the likely properties of the errors introduced in the frequencies. We discuss whether these frequency shifts have a form similar to the near-surface layers uncertainties and are therefore suppressed in the solar structure inversion. We also estimate directly their contribution, if any, in the solar sound-speed and density determinations using the SOLA technique.
  • We present an efficient method for two dimensional inversions for the solar rotation rate using the Subtractive Optimally Localized Averages (SOLA) method and a modification of the R1 X R1 technique proposed by Sekii (1993). The SOLA method is based on explicit construction of averaging kernels similar to the Backus-Gilbert method. The versatility and reliability of the SOLA method in reproducing a target form for the averaging kernel, in combination with the idea of the R1 X R1 decomposition, results in a computationally very efficient inversion algorithm. This is particularly important for full 2-D inversions of helioseismic data in which the number of modes runs into at least tens of thousands.