• Tests with cosmic ray muons of a small liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr TPC) in a magnetic field of 0.55 T are described. No effect of the magnetic field on the imaging properties were observed. In view of a future large, magnetized LAr TPC, we investigated the possibility to operate a high temperature superconducting (HTS) solenoid directly in the LAr of the detector. The critical current $I_c$ of HTS cables in an external magnetic field was measured at liquid nitrogen and liquid argon temperatures and a small prototype HTS solenoid was built and tested.
  • ArDM-1t is the prototype for a next generation WIMP detector measuring both the scintillation light and the ionization charge from nuclear recoils in a 1-ton liquid argon target. The goal is to reach a minimum recoil energy of 30\,keVr to detect recoiling nuclei. In this paper we describe the experimental concept and present results on the light detection system, tested for the first time in ArDM on the surface at CERN. With a preliminary and incomplete set of PMTs, the light yield at zero electric field is found to be between 0.3-0.5 phe/keVee depending on the position within the detector volume, confirming our expectations based on smaller detector setups.
  • The aim of the ArDM project is the development and operation of a one ton double-phase liquid argon detector for direct Dark Matter searches. The detector measures both the scintillation light and the ionization charge from ionizing radiation using two independent readout systems. This paper briefly describes the detector concept and presents preliminary results from the ArDM R&D program, including a 3 l prototype developed to test the charge readout system.
  • We constructed and operated a double phase (liquid-vapour) pure argon Large Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber (LAr LEM-TPC) with a sensitive area of 10x10 cm$^2$ and up to 30 cm of drift length. The LEM is a macroscopic hole electron multiplier built with standard PCB techniques: drifting electrons are extracted from the liquid to the vapour phase and driven into the holes of the LEM where the multiplication occurs. Moving charges induce a signal on the anode and on the LEM electrodes. The orthogonally segmented upper face of the upper LEM and anode permit the reconstruction of X-Y spatial coordinates of ionizing events. The detector is equipped with a Photo Multiplier Tube immersed in liquid for triggering the ionizing events and an argon purification circuit to ensure long drift paths. Cosmic muon tracks have been recorded and further characterization of the detector is ongoing. We believe that this proof of principle represents an important milestone in the realization of very large, long drift (cost-effective) LAr detectors for next generation neutrino physics and proton decay experiments, as well as for direct search of Dark Matter with imaging devices.
  • To optimise the design of the light readout in the ArDM 1-ton liquid argon dark matter detector, a range of reflector and WLS coating combinations were investigated in several small setups, where argon scintillation light was generated by radioactive sources in gas at normal temperature and pressure and shifted into the blue region by tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB). Various thicknesses of TPB were deposited by spraying and vacuum evaporation onto specular 3M{\small\texttrademark}-foil and diffuse Tetratex{\small\textregistered} (TTX) substrates. Light yields of each reflector and TPB coating combination were compared. Reflection coefficients of TPB coated reflectors were independently measured using a spectroradiometer in a wavelength range between 200 and 650 nm. WLS coating on the PMT window was also studied. These measurements were used to define the parameters of the light reflectors of the ArDM experiment. Fifteen large $120\times 25$ cm$^2$ TTX sheets were coated and assembled in the detector. Measurements in argon gas are reported providing good evidence of fulfilling the light collection requirements of the experiment.
  • We successfully operated a novel kind of LAr Time Projection Chamber based on a Large Electron Multiplier (LEM) readout system. The prototype, of about 3 liters active volume, is operated in liquid-vapour (double) phase pure Ar. The ionization electrons, after drifting in the LAr volume, are extracted by a set of grids into the gas phase and driven into the holes of a double stage LEM, where charge amplification occurs. Each LEM is a thick macroscopic hole multiplier of 10x10 cm$^2$ manufactured with standard PCB techniques. The electrons signal is readout via two orthogonal coordinates, one using the induced signal on the segmented upper electrode of the LEM itself and the other by collecting the electrons on a segmented anode. Custom-made preamplifiers have been especially developed for this purpose. Cosmic ray tracks have been successfully observed in pure gas at room temperature and in double phase Ar operation. We believe that this proof of principle represents an important milestone in the realization of very large, long drift (cost-effective) LAr detectors for next generation neutrino physics and proton decay experiments, as well as for direct search of Dark Matter with imaging devices.
  • Grand Unification of the strong, weak and electromagnetic interactions into a single unified gauge group is an extremely appealing idea which has been vigorously pursued theoretically and experimentally for many years. The detection of proton or bound-neutron decays would represent its most direct experimental evidence. In this context, we studied the physics potentialities of very large underground Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC). We carried out a detailed simulation of signal efficiency and background sources, including atmospheric neutrinos and cosmogenic backgrounds. We point out that a liquid Argon TPC, offering good granularity and energy resolution, low particle detection threshold, and excellent background discrimination, should yield very good signal over background ratios in many possible decay modes, allowing to reach partial lifetime sensitivities in the range of $10^{34}-10^{35}$ years with exposures up to 1000 kton$\times$year, often in quasi-background-free conditions optimal for discoveries at the few events level, corresponding to atmospheric neutrino background rejections of the order of $10^5$. Multi-prong decay modes like e.g. $p\to \mu^- \pi^+ K^+$ or $p\to e^+\pi^+\pi^-$ and channels involving kaons like e.g. $p\to K^+\bar\nu$, $p\to e^+K^0$ and $p\to \mu^+K^0$ are particularly suitable, since liquid Argon imaging (...)
  • A novel liquid argon (LAr) purity monitor was developed with a sensitivity to electronegative impurities of the order of ppb (O$_2$ equivalent). Such a high purity is e.g. needed in a LAr drift chamber. The principle is to measure the lifetime of quasifree electrons in LAr, since this is the important parameter for the operation of a drift chamber. Free electrons are produced by ionizing the LAr with $\alpha$-particles emitted by the $^{210}Po$ chain daughter of an isotope $^{210}Pb$ source. From a measurement of the charge of the electron cloud at the beginning and at the end of a drift path, together with the drift time, the lifetime of the electrons is obtained. The $\alpha$-particles have a very short range of about 50 \mu$m in LAr and the ionization density is very high, typically between $750\div 1500\rm MeV/cm$, leading to a high recombination rate. To suppress the recombination of the argon ions with the electrons, the $\alpha$-source was put in a strong electric field of $40\div 150$ kV/cm. This was achieved by depositing the source on the surface of a spherical high voltage cathode with a diameter of about 0.5 mm. The anode was also made as a sphere of about the same diameter as the cathode, thus, close to the axis between the two electrodes the electric drift field was approximately a dipole field.