• HD189733 is an active K dwarf that is, with its transiting hot Jupiter, among the most studied exoplanetary systems. In this first paper of the Multiwavelength Observations of an eVaporating Exoplanet and its Star (MOVES) program, we present a 2-year monitoring of the large-scale magnetic field of HD189733. The magnetic maps are reconstructed for five epochs of observations, namely June-July 2013, August 2013, September 2013, September 2014, and July 2015, using Zeeman-Doppler Imaging. We show that the field evolves along the five epochs, with mean values of the total magnetic field of 36, 41, 42, 32 and 37 G, respectively. All epochs show a toroidally-dominated field. Using previously published data of Moutou et al. 2007 and Fares et al. 2010, we are able to study the evolution of the magnetic field over 9 years, one of the longest monitoring campaign for a given star. While the field evolved during the observed epochs, no polarity switch of the poles was observed. We calculate the stellar magnetic field value at the position of the planet using the Potential Field Source Surface extrapolation technique. We show that the planetary magnetic environment is not homogeneous over the orbit, and that it varies between observing epochs, due to the evolution of the stellar magnetic field. This result underlines the importance of contemporaneous multi-wavelength observations to characterise exoplanetary systems. Our reconstructed maps are a crucial input for the interpretation and modelling of our MOVES multi-wavelength observations.
  • We report results of an extended spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri star V830 Tau and its recently-detected newborn close-in giant planet. Our observations, carried out within the MaTYSSE programme, were spread over 91d, and involved the ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimeters linked to the 3.6m Canada-France-Hawaii, the 2m Bernard Lyot and the 8-m Gemini-North Telescopes. Using Zeeman-Doppler Imaging, we characterize the surface brightness distributions, magnetic topologies and surface differential rotation of V830 Tau at the time of our observations, and demonstrate that both distributions evolve with time beyond what is expected from differential rotation. We also report that near the end of our observations, V830 Tau triggered one major flare and two weaker precursors, showing up as enhanced red-shifted emission in multiple spectral activity proxies. With 3 different filtering techniques, we model the radial velocity (RV) activity jitter (of semi-amplitude 1.2km/s) that V830 Tau generates, successfully retrieve the 68m/s RV planet signal hiding behind the jitter, further confirm the existence of V830 Tau b and better characterize its orbital parameters. We find that the method based on Gaussian-process regression performs best thanks to its higher ability at modelling not only the activity jitter, but also its temporal evolution over the course of our observations, and succeeds at reproducing our RV data down to a rms precision of 35m/s. Our result provides new observational constraints on scenarios of star / planet formation and demonstrates the scientific potential of large-scale searches for close-in giant planets around T Tauri stars.
  • We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri star LkCa4 within the MaTYSSE programme, involving ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Despite an age of only 2Myr and a similarity with prototypical classical T Tauri stars, LkCa4 shows no evidence for accretion and probes an interesting transition stage for star and planet formation. Large profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly-polarized lines of LkCa4 using Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD), indicating the presence of brightness inhomogeneities and magnetic fields at the surface of LkCa4. Using tomographic imaging, we reconstruct brightness and magnetic maps of LkCa4 from sets of unpolarized and circularly-polarized LSD profiles. The large-scale field is strong and mainly axisymmetric, featuring a ~2kG poloidal component and a ~1kG toroidal component encircling the star at equatorial latitudes - the latter making LkCa4 markedly different from classical TTauri stars of similar mass and age. The brightness map includes a dark spot overlapping the magnetic pole and a bright region at mid latitudes - providing a good match to the contemporaneous photometry. We also find that differential rotation at the surface of LkCa4 is small, typically ~5.5x weaker than that of the Sun, and compatible with solid-body rotation. Using our tomographic modelling, we are able to filter out the activity jitter in the RV curve of LkCa4 (of full amplitude 4.3km/s) down to a rms precision of 0.055km/s. Looking for hot Jupiters around young Sun-like stars thus appears feasible, even though we find no evidence for such planets around LkCa4.
  • We present here the final results of the first spectropolarimetric survey of a small sample of active M dwarfs, aimed at providing observational constraints on dynamo action on both sides of the full-convection threshold (spectral type M4). Our two previous studies (Donati et al. 2008b; Morin et al. 2008b) were focused on early and mid M dwarfs. The present paper examines 11 fully convective late M dwarfs (spectral types M5-M8). Tomographic imaging techniques were applied to time-series of circularly polarised profiles of 6 stars, in order to infer their large-scale magnetic topologies. For 3 other stars we could not produce such magnetic maps, because of low variability of the Stokes V signatures, but were able to derive some properties of the magnetic fields. We find 2 distinct categories of magnetic topologies: on the one hand strong axisymmetric dipolar fields (similar to mid M dwarfs), and on the other hand weak fields generally featuring a significant non-axisymmetric component, and sometimes a significant toroidal one. Comparison with unsigned magnetic fluxes demonstrates that the second category of magnetic fields shows less organization (less energy in the large scales), similarly to partly convective early M dwarfs. Stars in both categories have similar stellar parameters, our data do not evidence a separation between these 2 categories in the mass-rotation plane. We also report marginal detection of a large-scale magnetic field on the M8 star VB 10 featuring a significant toroidal axisymmetric component, whereas no field is detectable on VB 8 (M7).
  • HD 189733 is a K2 dwarf, orbited by a giant planet at 8.8 stellar radii. In order to study magnetospheric interactions between the star and the planet, we explore the large-scale magnetic field and activity of the host star. We collected spectra using the ESPaDOnS and the NARVAL spectropolarimeters, installed at the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii telescope and the 2-m Telescope Bernard Lyot at Pic du Midi, during two monitoring campaigns (June 2007 and July 2008). HD 189733 has a mainly toroidal surface magnetic field, having a strength that reaches up to 40 G. The star is differentially rotating, with latitudinal angular velocity shear of domega = 0.146 +- 0.049 rad/d, corresponding to equatorial and polar periods of 11.94 +- 0.16 d and 16.53 +- 2.43 d respectively. The study of the stellar activity shows that it is modulated mainly by the stellar rotation (rather than by the orbital period or the beat period between the stellar rotation and the orbital periods). We report no clear evidence of magnetospheric interactions between the star and the planet. We also extrapolated the field in the stellar corona and calculated the planetary radio emission expected for HD 189733b given the reconstructed field topology. The radio flux we predict in the framework of this model is time variable and potentially detectable with LOFAR.
  • From observations collected with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we report the detection of Zeeman signatures on the low-mass classical TTauri star (cTTS) V2247Oph. Profile distortions and circular polarisation signatures detected in photospheric lines can be interpreted as caused by cool spots and magnetic regions at the surface of the star. The large-scale field is of moderate strength and highly complex; moreover, both the spot distribution and the magnetic field show significant variability on a timescale of only one week, as a likely result of strong differential rotation. Both properties make V2247Oph very different from the (more massive) prototypical cTTS BPTau; we speculate that this difference reflects the lower mass of V2247Oph. During our observations, V2247Oph was in a low-accretion state, with emission lines showing only weak levels of circular polarisation; we nevertheless find that excess emission apparently concentrates in a mid-latitude region of strong radial field, suggesting that it is the footpoint of an accretion funnel. The weaker and more complex field that we report on V2247Oph may share similarities with those of very-low-mass late-M dwarfs and potentially explain why low-mass cTTSs rotate on average faster than intermediate mass ones. These surprising results need confirmation from new independent data sets on V2247Oph and other similar low-mass cTTSs.
  • In this paper, we present new spectropolarimetric observations of the planet-hosting star Tau Bootis, using ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimeters at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and Telescope Bernard Lyot (TBL), respectively. We detected the magnetic field of the star at three epochs in 2008. It is a weak magnetic field of only a few Gauss, oscillating between a predominant toroidal component in January and a dominant poloidal component in June and July. A magnetic polarity reversal was observed relative to the magnetic topology in June 2007. This is the second such reversal observed in two years on this star, suggesting that Tau Boo has a magnetic cycle of about 2 years. This is the first detection of a magnetic cycle for a star other than the Sun. The role of the close-in massive planet in the short activity cycle of the star is questioned. Tau Boo has strong differential rotation, a common trend for stars with shallow convective envelope. At latitude 40 deg., the surface layer of the star rotates in 3.31 d, equal to the orbital period. Synchronization suggests that the tidal effects induced by the planet may be strong enough to force at least the thin convective envelope into corotation. Tau Boo shows variability in the Ca H & K and Halpha throughout the night and on a night to night time scale. We do not detect enhancement in the activity of the star that may be related to the conjunction of the planet. Further data is needed to conclude about the activity enhancement due to the planet.
  • We present in this paper the first results of a spectropolarimetric analysis of a small sample (~ 20) of active stars ranging from spectral type M0 to M8, which are either fully-convective or possess a very small radiative core. This study aims at providing new constraints on dynamo processes in fully-convective stars. The present paper focuses on 5 stars of spectral type ~M4, i.e. with masses close to the full convection threshold (~ 0.35 Msun), and with short rotational periods. Tomographic imaging techniques allow us to reconstruct the surface magnetic topologies from the rotationally modulated time-series of circularly polarised profiles. We fnd that all stars host mainly axisymmetric large-scale poloidal fields. Three stars were observed at two different epochs separated by ~1 yr; we find the magnetic topologies to be globally stable on this timescale. We also provide an accurate estimation of the rotational period of all stars, thus allowing us to start studying how rotation impacts the large-scale magnetic field.
  • The nature of the magnetic coupling between T Tauri stars and their disks determines not only the mass accretion process but possibly the spin evolution of the central star. We have taken a recently-published surface magnetogram of one moderately-accreting T Tauri star (V2129 Oph) and used it to extrapolate the geometry of its large-scale field. We determine the structure of the open (wind-bearing) field lines, the closed (X-ray bright) field lines and those potentially accreting field lines that pass through the equatorial plane inside the Keplerian co-rotation radius. We consider a series of models in which the stellar magnetic field is opened up by the outward pressure of the hot coronal gas at a range of radii. As this radius is increased, accretion takes place along simpler field structures and impacts on fewer sites at the stellar surface. This is consistent with the observed variation in the Ca II IRT and HeI lines which suggests that accretion in the visible hemisphere is confined to a single high-latitude spot. By determining the density and velocity of the accretion flows, we find that in order to have most of the total mass accretion rate impacting on a single high-latitude region we need disk material to accrete from approximately 7R*, close to the Keplerian co-rotation radius at 6.8R*. We also calculate the coronal density and X-ray emission measure. We find that both the magnitude and rotational modulation of the emission measure increase as the source surface is increased. For the field structure of V2129 Oph which is dominantly octupolar, the emission forms a bright, high-latitude ring that is always in view as the star rotates. Since the accretion funnels are not dense enough to cause significant scattering of coronal X-ray photons, they provide only a low rotational modulation of around 10% at most.
  • We report in this paper phase-resolved spectropolarimetric observations of the rapidly-rotating fully-convective M4 dwarf V374 Peg, on which a strong, mainly axisymmetric, large-scale poloidal magnetic field was recently detected. In addition to the original data set secured in 2005 August, we present here new data collected in 2005 September and 2006 August. From the rotational modulation of unpolarised line profiles, we conclude that starspots are present at the surface of the star, but their contrast and fractional coverage are much lower than those of non-fully convective active stars with similar rotation rate. Applying tomographic imaging on each set of circularly polarised profiles separately, we find that the large-scale magnetic topology is remarkably stable on a timescale of 1 yr; repeating the analysis on the complete data set suggests that the magnetic configuration is sheared by very weak differential rotation (about 1/10th of the solar surface shear) and only slightly distorted by intrinsic variability. This result is at odds with various theoretical predictions, suggesting that dynamo fields of fully-convective stars should be mostly non-axisymmetric unless they succeed at triggering significant differential rotation.